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View Full Version : base for material bins?


CNYScapes
12-22-2007, 09:23 AM
I am in the process of building my bins for mulch, stone, topsoil. Other than concrete or asphalt, what can i put down on the ground so my materials do not mix in with the stone base when driving in to the bin with my bucket down.
I have seen one local guy using railroad tracks laid in the ground to ride his bucket on, but I am looking for any other ideas you guys can come up with?

PerfectEarth
12-22-2007, 09:46 AM
I would seriously consider a solid base like the ones you mentioned- concrete or asphalt. It's really the only material that will hold up to an agressive bucket. Anything else I think is gonna cause you major pains in the rear. And be SURE to have the bins sloped back to front so that water will not pool in them.

It's a good quesiton, I just couldn;t think of anything. RR ties will move and material will get caught, they will heave and seperate over time.... How many bins are you going to make?

PerfectEarth
12-22-2007, 09:52 AM
Here are some pics of our bins-

CNYScapes
12-22-2007, 11:23 AM
I am putting in 8 bins. What are the dimensions of those? What did that setup cost you? Was it engineered by somebody or did you design it? VERY NICE SETUP Im just not sure i want to spend that much money.

Adam12
12-22-2007, 11:48 AM
You can use unilock or those types of wall or floor system. If your near a manufacturer of these types of materials sometimes you can get them very cheap if they are same size different bundles. This will make a great floor for bins.

PerfectEarth
12-22-2007, 05:19 PM
CNY- I think the bins were costly- as in, over 25,000. Each one is 12 ft. wide, I think. A concrete company we use did it with our help on what we wanted. They are at my full time job, so they are not exactly MINE!

P.Services
12-22-2007, 05:24 PM
thats insane to spend that kind of cash on a few bins!!! pour a nice size slab yourself and buy the big concrete blocks and be done with it. a guy by me made some bins like that and then ended up tearing them out to use the block because they would bump it with the loader and kept breaking them.

Mike Fronczak
12-27-2007, 11:07 AM
Blocks are cheap. I looked at them this fall locally 2'x2'x4' was $ 30 or 40 can't recall exactly. BUT the are HEAVY (3300 lbs) & I would have had to arange for trucking, or take them 2 at a time on my trailer & hope my Bobcat could lift them (873 rated at 2500 lbs).
For my salt bin, I opted to set 6x6 posts, & use 2x6's for sides. It hold a tractor traler load, which was my goal. So far so good one wall is pitched slightly (10 degrees or less), I'll have to fix it in the spring & reinforce the walls with bracing/ covered lean to area on each side. Since I am the one loading the wear factor isn't really an issue (I don't have idiots rammping it). It is at my home so I really wanted it to look presentable since I have to look at it & the mafia blocks look pretty industrial.

Tony Clifton
01-06-2008, 04:43 PM
I couldnt imagine spending 25k on building bins.
I really don't see why you need anything as a base.
If you are doing any type of volume, simply use the product in each particulr bin as your base. Simply excavate 3-6" below grade in the area of your bin and then dump the material in there. As long as you have someone that knows how to operate a loader without digging into the ground you shoudl be good....and save a lot of money that does not need to be spent.

YellowDogSVC
01-07-2008, 01:49 PM
I couldnt imagine spending 25k on building bins.
I really don't see why you need anything as a base.
If you are doing any type of volume, simply use the product in each particulr bin as your base. Simply excavate 3-6" below grade in the area of your bin and then dump the material in there. As long as you have someone that knows how to operate a loader without digging into the ground you shoudl be good....and save a lot of money that does not need to be spent.

I think this makes sense. Anyone else try this?

SLSNursery
01-24-2008, 09:25 PM
Those are nice bins that were poured with poured walls. I go for the big blocks on 6" pad. I'm with Picasso on being afraid to knock the poured one over. However that is a cleaner look. My bins are between 6 and 8 feet tall. As I noted in the other post, the rebar and wire doesn't hold up too well along an 8' tall wall of blocks on the back edge of a 6" pad. We are experimenting now with a 18" to 2" deep footing under the pad, the width of the wall along the run. Hopefully that will work. It took about 8 years for the first set of pours to crack enough to need maintenance.

Monty
02-07-2008, 06:19 PM
when I built my bins we excavated the area out bought the 2x2x6 concrete blocks set them on a base of limestone and then put asphalt down for the base. We hauled the asphalt ourseves and spread it by hand then rented a small roller form our local rental yard. have held up quite well for the past 7 years.

lawncare18
02-14-2008, 04:17 PM
CNY.. Nice new shop area you got there .. went by the other day looks great!!! Hope you have a great season!!!!

CNYScapes
02-14-2008, 07:39 PM
Thanks, We are in a rush to get things done for a spring opening. As long as we dont get blasted with snow for the next month, we will be ready April 1st!

allinearth
02-14-2008, 09:26 PM
What....No pics??:confused: