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siklid1066
01-30-2008, 03:10 PM
At what weight does a trailer have to be to have brakes?Can a truck stop a trailer if the brakes or brake box dont work?

Raven386
01-30-2008, 03:12 PM
i think most tandem axle trailers have brakes. i dont think ive seen any single axle trailers with them. and yes the truck can stop an unloaded trailer without brakes. but once its loaded its just unsafe for everyone around you and your truck.

NBI Lawn
01-30-2008, 03:21 PM
I think it is when the gross weight is 7,000lbs or greater. In MN double axle trailers have to have brakes on both axles.

ZX12R
01-30-2008, 10:37 PM
I am pretty sure that its now a law all trailers must have brakes(in NJ ). I don't know about the rinky dinky U-haul trailers,but if you are a landscaper,you better have them here. One of the first things they do if you are stopped is to check for a brake controller.

topsites
01-31-2008, 01:33 AM
Check your state laws, also I would purchase the trailer from a local dealer because they usually would not sell you an illegal trailer.

Mike Fronczak
01-31-2008, 01:09 PM
Check with your state dot, I thought any trailer used commercilly needed brake, but I'm not positive, & I know there are contractors out there that use ones with out brakes.

Exact Rototilling
01-31-2008, 07:13 PM
In the sate of Idaho - if a trailer weighs in at just over 1600 pounds empty it needs to have brakes. I'm struggling with this very issue now. My 6 x 12 enclosed, no brakes, will be right at 2,000 to 2,200 pounds loaded. My tow vehicles are not what I would call super capable. 85 Toyota 4x4 and a 91 4runner. I'm sure a new Toyota Tundra has superior stopping power when compared to my current rigs even if the trailer is maxed out at 2,990 vs. the 2,000 with my older Toyotas.

Dave Maher
01-31-2008, 08:33 PM
I believe it is GVWR 2000 lbs.

GravelyNut
02-01-2008, 02:14 AM
I believe it is GVWR 2000 lbs.

Varries from state to state but that was a common set point.
3000 lb or less GVWR trailer is not required to have them if the loaded trailer weighs less than 40% of the towing vehicle per ( 49 CFR 393.42(b) (3)-(4)). Combo must, however, be able to stop in 35 feet from 20 MPH. BC set it at 3080 lbs (1400 kg ) and under 50% towed to tow vehicle licensed weight ratio.

Albery's Lawn & Tractor
02-01-2008, 02:21 AM
I don't care if it's required or not, I would never have another trailer withour brakes. Its much safer with them and you can really feel the difference.

tomo
02-01-2008, 08:45 AM
hello ,
brakes on one axle
if weight of trailer is between 1650lbs to 4400lbs

brakes on all wheels when weight is over 4400lbs
brake away kit also needs fitting over 4400 lbs

If the trailer is between 75% or equal to the vehicle weight stopping becomes a major issue particularly if driving in wet road conditions .

Check your state laws

tom:waving:o

GravelyNut
02-02-2008, 07:31 PM
I don't care if it's required or not, I would never have another trailer withour brakes. Its much safer with them and you can really feel the difference. I would tend to agree with you on anything over 1 ton. But I have a single axle 4'X6' that at 1 ton is a flea behind the truck. In fact, unless it has a load on it, the only way I know it is back there is when it bounces on a bump. Not many single axle trailers have brakes at that rating.

shop22
02-03-2008, 01:25 PM
Last I knew in NY if the trailer weighed more than 999 lbs it had to have brakes. We have built a couple trailers and weighed them, then had to take out some material to be under 1000 so we didn't have to install brakes.

topsites
02-03-2008, 02:25 PM
If the trailer is between 75% or equal to the vehicle weight stopping becomes a major issue particularly if driving in wet road conditions .

Gets even trickier if you have a long bed club cab and the truck is heavier to begin with, but I agree that anything over 50% of the weight of the truck to me is overload... Not saying you can't do it, not saying you shouldn't or that I have never done it, but I'd say over half the weight is right about where the fun first begins.