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View Full Version : What do you drive and whats your mpg avg loaded and unloaded


Lovingreen
02-08-2008, 10:30 AM
Oil hurts these days, Who is making changes in their trucks and equipment and how happy are you with your choice?

TXNSLighting
02-08-2008, 10:46 AM
Drive an 07 Duramax. gets 20mpg highway, 16 in town, 14 pullin. cant complain. get 5 mpg better all around than my cummins did. not hurtin me any. My customers pay for my fuel. So should everyones customers...

AI Inc
02-08-2008, 10:54 AM
I have an 00 f350 about 11 mpg , an 04 e 250 gets around 8 loaded and just bought an 08 ranger 2.3 gets 29 mpg

Az Gardener
02-08-2008, 10:59 AM
04 Dodge Cummins 40-K 17.1 in town. The boss dosen't tow so I don't know what tow mileage is. When the crew had it I think it was around 14. I haven't had it on the highway for over a year so can't speak to that either.

The crew is driving a 04 UD cab over with a 14" dump bed and pulling a 16' enclosed and I think it gets around 12-13 in town.

AI Inc
02-08-2008, 11:06 AM
04 Dodge Cummins 40-K 17.1 in town. The boss dosen't tow so I don't know what tow mileage is. When the crew had it I think it was around 14. I haven't had it on the highway for over a year so can't speak to that either.

The crew is driving a 04 UD cab over with a 14" dump bed and pulling a 16' enclosed and I think it gets around 12-13 in town.

That UD will last forever. Considered the caddilac of the mid weight jap truck class.

shane mapes
02-08-2008, 11:10 AM
03 Nissan frontier , i get 16 on freeway 14 in town loaded..

TXNSLighting
02-08-2008, 11:12 AM
03 Nissan frontier , i get 16 on freeway 14 in town loaded..

........ha!

Lovingreen
02-08-2008, 11:18 AM
The duramax wins so far....what else you got?

To texas....tell me more about your truck setup.

stroker51
02-08-2008, 12:17 PM
I catch a lot of crap for running older trucks..... but. I've got a 96 F250 with the 7.3 Powerstroke that is my workhorse. 206K miles, and i still get 16-18 running highway empty, pulling my 18' flatbed with a 60" mid z, a 54" stander, a 44" w/b and all the other crap i get average 14.5 highway/city. Plowing snow i go through about $80 worth of fuel, can't remember off the top of my head how many gallons that is, and last time I plowed i was out from 4:30 in the morning till 10:30 that night. Not what texan is getting with his D-max, but i gave $10,000 for this truck 3 years and 60k ago. My 99 powerstroke crew cab dually is about 15-16 average highway/city. I think any of your pre-08 emissions diesel trucks will be your best bet. Sure diesel is higher, but when i would plow with my 460 or 351 powered trucks, I remember several times i paid out well over $100-150 in fuel a year ago, and my route was a lot smaller.

GSPHUNTER
02-08-2008, 12:59 PM
'01 Dmax get 16 with about a 3k lb load and 18mpg unloaded. Highway speeds are usually 70-75.

I think the diesel treatments really help mileage. It may not save you money, but it doesn't cost anything either because the fuel savings pays for the additive. With new diesel being so sh*tty, injectors, lift pumps, and other fuel related problems are more common. The additives lube alot better, and get you more mpg's. It costs about $2.25 more per fillup. I'm running Howe's in mine.

Sorry about the off topic additive talk, but figured it would help some people out.

GravelyGuy
02-08-2008, 01:10 PM
2007 Tundra:

MPG:
City Unloaded- 14-15
City Loaded- 11-12
Highway Unloaded- 17-18
Highway Loaded- ???

I went on a country drive yesterday to a trailer dealer going 65 the whole way and got 20.1 MPG:drinkup: It really is all about how you drive it. I have noticed a 1-3 MPG loss ever since the cold weather set in.

Grassbuster
02-08-2008, 01:16 PM
2006 F350PSD - mileage is not to bad. I'd guess 12mpg around town.
2007 Jeep Wrangler - 17-20mpg around town:usflag:
Kubota - about 12 hrs. before fill up
Gator - once a month around town
Horses - $4.00 bale of hay

Gravel Rat
02-08-2008, 03:14 PM
2003 F-450 6.0 6spd 2wd weighs 9200lbs empty I get 12mpg it is my daily driver put about 300kms (186 miles) a week on the truck.

topsites
02-08-2008, 04:10 PM
As for choice only half is mine so the fact mine has a large engine I have to deal with, also with older vehicles there are things get to a point it hurts mpg some, fine... But it's hardly my fault that in 20 years the manufacturers have done nothing to increase fuel efficiency, this I tolerate best I can.

1995 D-2500 slt laramie roadmaster edition, 360 cid Magnum, 11mpg trailered.
Not sure unhitched, never enough of this to come up with conclusive data.

btw my 1986 D-250 I sold just over a year ago, she was 20 years old and got 14 mpg hitched, granted 318cid but carb'd...
I did learn the club cab has an impact, as does a/c.

Current improvements:
10.2 mm High performance Taylor spark plug wires, Autolite double platinum spark plugs, Mr.Gasket High performance air filter, Mallory High performance cap and rotor, Mallory High performance ignition coil, synthetic oil, High performance breather cap, all or most maintenance up to date.
And for now a cheaper $100 truck bed cover, but hopefully soon a decent $400 tonneau cover.

Far future ideas:
A full (100%) aluminum trailer, possibly a fiberglass hood, and a big maybe on carbon fiber racing seats, slimmest chance on carbon fiber fenders.

hosejockey2002
02-08-2008, 04:22 PM
possibly a fiberglass hood, and a big maybe on carbon fiber racing seats, slimmest chance on carbon fiber fenders.

Why??:confused::confused:

bhforty3
02-08-2008, 04:23 PM
I drive an '03 dodge 2500 crew cab cummins diesel. :cool2:I get about 17.5 pulling loaded trailer in townand 22-23 running down the highway.:) I put on a 5" exhaust,edge chip,and kn air filter to improve milage. Duralax is ok but I would much rather be cummin than strokin. :weightlifter:1 RAM :rolleyes:#2 BOWTIE :cry:#3 blue oval:laugh:

okeefl
02-08-2008, 04:36 PM
2004 F250 Crewcab 4X4. I get around 15 mpg and it does'nt seem to differ much when loaded.

Drew Gemma
02-08-2008, 05:19 PM
2002 f350 dually lariat v-10 ext. cab 8 ft dump bed 7.6 mpg all the time

Gravel Rat
02-08-2008, 05:20 PM
My fuel mileage may drop to 10 if I haul something heavy but otherwise loaded or empty 12mpg is the norm. It was about the same with all my F-450s. My 88 F-450 with 460 power got 6 to 8 mpg loaded or empty. The diesels 10-12. The old 460 gas was surprising good even when the truck was grossing 17,000lbs hauling a load of gravel. For years Fords have always had lower mpg but it never changed much hauling a load or running around empty.

You get a Chevy gas pot especailly the old 1 ton dually flatdecks with 350 power they got good mileage empty but put a load on them the burned gallons of gas.

blind04
02-08-2008, 05:29 PM
i have a 2000 chevy silverado extended cab 4 door with the 5.3 and pull a open trailer that weights 3400 lbs with both my mowers and all trimmers and such on it. i get the same mileage wether i am pulling the trailer or not. around 14 mpg, i know alot of you out there wont beleive me, but i am sure i am getting that good becouse my neighbor is also in lawn care (we used to be partners before i bought him out 4 years ago) and he has a very similar set up and gets around 14 also.

topsites
02-08-2008, 05:42 PM
Why??:confused::confused:

Weight reduction, fiberglass is cheaper but carbon fiber is lighter, some are available in either material and others are not, neither is exactly inexpensive thou. I forget but something like every 6-700 pounds = +1 mpg? It actually works out to a percent and depends on your current curb weight and mpg, the lighter your truck and the better your mpg to begin with, the more you gain in terms of actual miles per gallon but the benefit exists as a constant percent.

Thou I'll likely get the trailer first, it's the cheapest option in dollars per pound saved, and it doesn't get sold when the truck does.

On that note I need to get the back seat out, that would be far cheaper, now I remember.

zedosix
02-08-2008, 06:11 PM
04 Dodge Cummins 40-K 17.1 in town. The boss dosen't tow so I don't know what tow mileage is. When the crew had it I think it was around 14. I haven't had it on the highway for over a year so can't speak to that either.

The crew is driving a 04 UD cab over with a 14" dump bed and pulling a 16' enclosed and I think it gets around 12-13 in town.

Are you sure that isn't 17.2 miles to the gallon. :laugh::laugh:

tamadrummer
02-08-2008, 06:25 PM
2007 Tundra:

MPG:
City Unloaded- 14-15
City Loaded- 11-12
Highway Unloaded- 17-18
Highway Loaded- ???

I went on a country drive yesterday to a trailer dealer going 65 the whole way and got 20.1 MPG:drinkup: It really is all about how you drive it. I have noticed a 1-3 MPG loss ever since the cold weather set in.

Color me crazy but cooler air should increase your fuel mileage. More air in less space makes for better economy. That is why they put inlet chillers in power plant intakes.

You may want to run those numbers again. Has your air been super dry or humid? If you have been a bit humid it should be even better because you are adding more mass to the air.

All_Toro_4ME
02-08-2008, 06:28 PM
'08 Chev Silverado Ext cab. I just bought it, so I only know the unloaded stats. Its around 17 approx. It has the active fuel management, supposed to shut down 4 cylinders and run on the other 4 to help save fuel. Dont know about that either. Havent noticed anything. Still under 500 miles on it, dealer said 1000 miles to break engine in.

TXNSLighting
02-08-2008, 06:48 PM
I drive an '03 dodge 2500 crew cab cummins diesel. :cool2:I get about 17.5 pulling loaded trailer in townand 22-23 running down the highway.:) I put on a 5" exhaust,edge chip,and kn air filter to improve milage. Duralax is ok but I would much rather be cummin than strokin. :weightlifter:1 RAM :rolleyes:#2 BOWTIE :cry:#3 blue oval:laugh:

BS!!!!!!!!!!

KTM
02-08-2008, 06:50 PM
1997 Dodge 2500 cummins 4x4 with the cold weather we have had I only get about 12 mixed driving. When it is warmer with regular blend fuel i get 16 mixed driving, highway I can get 20 mpg. all of these numbers are driving easy with no trailers and tires at 80psi.

TXNSLighting
02-08-2008, 06:50 PM
The duramax wins so far....what else you got?

To texas....tell me more about your truck setup.

just a crew cab shortbed LBZ duramax! Got 33 inch tires. thats about it.

tamadrummer
02-08-2008, 07:12 PM
1997 Dodge 2500 cummins 4x4 with the cold weather we have had I only get about 12 mixed driving. When it is warmer with regular blend fuel i get 16 mixed driving, highway I can get 20 mpg. all of these numbers are driving easy with no trailers and tires at 80psi.

Why is the cooler weather affecting your mileage so much to the negative?

I was a shift supervisor in a power plant for a long time and cooling the inlets down was a way to increase power and efficiency, since you are not going faster than you normally would go it does not make sense that you are losing fuel mileage when it is cold. In theory. In practice it is obviously something totally something different.

Hopefully someone can explain this.

GravelyGuy
02-08-2008, 07:34 PM
Why is the cooler weather affecting your mileage so much to the negative?

I was a shift supervisor in a power plant for a long time and cooling the inlets down was a way to increase power and efficiency, since you are not going faster than you normally would go it does not make sense that you are losing fuel mileage when it is cold. In theory. In practice it is obviously something totally something different.

Hopefully someone can explain this.

Cool air is more dense. More air means more fuel to compensate = lower MPG. Cool air does increase HP as you said, hence cold air intakes. You can feel a noticeable difference in some engines when it's cold outside, I can.

tamadrummer
02-08-2008, 08:07 PM
Cool air is more dense. More air means more fuel to compensate = lower MPG. Cool air does increase HP as you said, hence cold air intakes. You can feel a noticeable difference in some engines when it's cold outside, I can.

So you are running more efficiently, you are needing to press the gas pedal less because you get more hp for your buck so it still makes no sense.

You are going to same speed right? If you are going faster and using all of the extra power being used by the extra air/fuel going into the engine than sure I can understand or running under a heavy load but running apples to apples.

Hot vs. cold in an unloaded truck you should get better mileage in cold weather unless you are flying since you can get more out of the same engine in that cool weather. Of course this is all theory and is not working out since you and someone else are getting miles per gallon less in cold weather.

GravelyGuy
02-08-2008, 08:15 PM
So you are running more efficiently, you are needing to press the gas pedal less because you get more hp for your buck so it still makes no sense.

You are going to same speed right? If you are going faster and using all of the extra power being used by the extra air/fuel going into the engine than sure I can understand or running under a heavy load but running apples to apples.

Hot vs. cold in an unloaded truck you should get better mileage in cold weather unless you are flying since you can get more out of the same engine in that cool weather. Of course this is all theory and is not working out since you and someone else are getting miles per gallon less in cold weather.

Yeah that is in theory. The engine makes more HP so you shouldn't have to press the gas as hard, but it only makes the engine a little more peppy it doesn't add 100 HP. You still have to press the gas just as hard. Trust me, I promise you get worse gas mileage in cold weather with gas engines.

I race nitro powered 2-stroke R/C trucks. The needles on the carb need adjusted every time you run them. They have High, Low, and Mid needles. They are extremely sensitive to air temp. You have to richen them(more fuel) in colder weather, the same way your vehicles computer compensates.

lawnboy dan
02-08-2008, 08:15 PM
03 tundra v6-16city/20 hwy-no load-with trailer12mpgcity. 93 cheyv 1500/305=10mpg towing city. 96toyota t100(boss truck)2.7-18 mpg city

hosejockey2002
02-08-2008, 08:22 PM
Weight reduction, fiberglass is cheaper but carbon fiber is lighter, some are available in either material and others are not, neither is exactly inexpensive thou. I forget but something like every 6-700 pounds = +1 mpg? It actually works out to a percent and depends on your current curb weight and mpg, the lighter your truck and the better your mpg to begin with, the more you gain in terms of actual miles per gallon but the benefit exists as a constant percent.

I figured it was weight reduction you were after, but it's not gonna pencil out. I don't know what a fiberglass hood costs, but you start talking carbon fiber fenders and racing seats just to save maybe 100 pounds, you're going to have to drive about 2,000,000 miles to make up the savings in fuel mileage.

KTM
02-08-2008, 08:29 PM
So you are running more efficiently, you are needing to press the gas pedal less because you get more hp for your buck so it still makes no sense.

You are going to same speed right? If you are going faster and using all of the extra power being used by the extra air/fuel going into the engine than sure I can understand or running under a heavy load but running apples to apples.

Hot vs. cold in an unloaded truck you should get better mileage in cold weather unless you are flying since you can get more out of the same engine in that cool weather. Of course this is all theory and is not working out since you and someone else are getting miles per gallon less in cold weather

Diesel mpg always suffers in the winter, I think the winter blend of the fuel has somthing to do with it to.

topsites
02-08-2008, 09:40 PM
I figured it was weight reduction you were after, but it's not gonna pencil out. I don't know what a fiberglass hood costs, but you start talking carbon fiber fenders and racing seats just to save maybe 100 pounds, you're going to have to drive about 2,000,000 miles to make up the savings in fuel mileage.

First off all of this stuff is iffy anyhow, more along the lines if I got money burning a hole in my pocket than must-do stuff, did say that I think, but now I sure did. And you might be correct in terms of raw mpg increases but it boils down to more than that... Less in terms of wear and tear, less stops for fuel, and so on, all this adds up. There's even that minor pure profit increase, in terms of pay off to me it is all about the increase on the profit... If all it does is give me 20 more cents on 10 dollars, considering I only get maybe a dollar out of that 10 anyhow, that 10-20 cents to me is a LOT of money!

A lot of folks fail to see it, but if cost on 10 dollars is 9 then my profit is 1.
And if all I get is another 10 cents that's 1.10 now I get above and beyond and I've just increased my bottom line by 10% and in my business it is all about the profit.

As for miles I don't care because my figures are in terms of gallons per week, so it boils down to how much time will it take?

Here I am past all the short-term mpg gains, no matter how I look at it I am to that point if I want more out of it I am looking to spend in terms of not only 3-400 dollars and up, but things that will take 3-4 years to pay for themselves once over. And you might again be right, if the truck ends up not making it another 6-8 years then I lose out.

That's just the way it goes, all the simple stuff has been done, with the exception of taking out the back seat.
I suppose I could remove interior paneling, but for all that I'd rather replace the hood, it is about improvement.
Because come time to sell it I have to put the back seat in, the hood however could stay.

Now my prices a hood is $300, the seats about 4-500, I think fenders 450...
Here again the trailer is 3 grand, it's the most upfront but it lasts 8-10 years easy, this is likely still the first and possibly only thing I will upgrade in the end, if I even do any of it.

RGM
02-08-2008, 09:49 PM
'87 Suburban heavy duty 3/4 ton 5.7 fule injected 3Sp w/ granny gear about 12 mpg towing around town. Have gotten up to 20 mpg highway on camping trips.

topsites
02-08-2008, 09:53 PM
Oh I did want to add...

The reason it gets worse mpg in cold weather is likely due to cold weather starts, it takes the engine a few more minutes to warm up vs. in warmer temps. The actual loss of fuel is minor, we're talking maybe 1/10th of a gallon or so per day, maybe a pint or a 1/2 pint I don't know but it does affect the FE gauges and it looks far worse than actual losses, still what is it, 0.5 to 1 or 2 mpg?

So whatever you guys do, please do NOT start with heated intakes :laugh:
Please leave it cold, it is more efficient that way, at least after it warms up.

On that note plugging it in won't cost less either.

Valk
02-09-2008, 12:19 AM
'00 Nissan Frontier 2.4 / 4 cyl
22mpg Spring-Fall / 20mpg Winter

Possible theory: Cold air is more dense, more atoms/cubic foot - so therefore we're having to drive through a thicker 'sea' of air...

GravelyNut
02-09-2008, 04:03 AM
2001 Chevy 3500 Ext Cab LS dually, 8.1L ( 496 ci ), 5 speed Allison, 4.10 gears, factory oversized air filter, aluminium topper, 215/85-16 Load Range E tires, mud flaps front and rear, Waag "Kick Out" wheel to wheel side tubes. Loaded 14 MPG. Empty about the same, although last trip south one tankful only was 10 MPG. Highway speeds of 70 MPH up or downhill empty or loaded. Just made an empty trip to Key West plus 80 miles of local driving and still 13.91 MPG. 95% of the time on regular unleaded.

And it does like the colder air and has no loss of MPG. As long as I keep my foot off the firewall.

zedosix
02-09-2008, 10:27 AM
'00 Nissan Frontier 2.4 / 4 cyl
22mpg Spring-Fall / 20mpg Winter

Possible theory: Cold air is more dense, more atoms/cubic foot - so therefore we're having to drive through a thicker 'sea' of air...

Winter driving is always harder on fuel consumption.

BrandonV
02-09-2008, 10:35 AM
i float around vehicles main truck is my c7500 w/ a cat and 10speed eaton fuller. avg around 9mpg loaded at around 40-50klbs, don't drive it unloaded a lot but I once got around 13mpg hwy w/o trailer. my mini cooper on the other hand gets around 35mpgm

Fahzu
02-09-2008, 11:15 AM
'05 Nissan Titan

....10mpg w/ heavy load

....11mpg w/ my normal maint. equipment in the bed

....15mpg w/ no load on a straight flat run on a perfect day with no head wind and only me in the truck drafting behind a semi. Okay, I'm exagerating, but it sucks in comparison to everyone else's mpgs.:cry:

GravelyNut
02-09-2008, 11:18 AM
'05 Nissan Titan

....10mpg w/ heavy load

....11mpg w/ my normal maint. equipment in the bed

....15mpg w/ no load on a straight flat run on a perfect day with no head wind and only me in the truck drafting behind a semi. Okay, I'm exagerating, but it sucks in comparison to everyone else's mpgs.:cry:
Must be the Ca emissions requirements.

WHIPPLE5.7
02-09-2008, 11:45 AM
1997 Chevy 3/4 ton with 350(cold air intake, cumputer tune, and exhaust)16 mpg
2004 GMC 1/2 ton 5.3(cold air intake, tune, exhaust)15 mpg
1992 Ford Ranger 4 cyl.(homemade intake and homemade exhaust)30 mpg

jtkplc
02-09-2008, 12:22 PM
2004 Ram Quad Cab 2500 Diesel:
Highway empty: 19-21mpg at 60-65mph, 16-18mpg 65mph+
Highway loaded: 14-16mpg at 60-65mph
City empty: 12-14mpg
City loaded: 10-12mpg

tmc8524
02-09-2008, 12:41 PM
I think it's funny when I hear people with any kind of full size truck say that they get any more then 20mpg. unless you got a chip and all that jazz, i don't believe it. one thing i found out the hard way though, is that smaller is not better if you are hauling. i thought i would downsize and get better mileage since my work truck is also my personal, BAD IDEA. if you are gonna be hauling anything i guess poor fuel mileage is just the price you gotta pay

LawnTamer
02-09-2008, 12:41 PM
EPA test show that nearly all vehicles get lower mpg in cold weather. This is due to the time that is required for the engine to reach optimum temps. and the fact that the colder, denser air creates more wind resistance for the vehicle. Most vehicles experience about a 2 mpg drop in winter.

I have an 04 Silverado 2500HD supercab 4x4. 6.0 Vortec The fuel economy is disappointing in city driving.
City:
10mpg towing open trailer about 2,400lbs loaded
11mpg unloaded

Highway:
11mpg towing 18' travel trailer
14unloaded

I made a 2,000+ mile road trip hauling with about 1,200lbs in the bed and towing an open trailer with 4 wheelers, my best tank was nearly 12 mpg and my worst was 10.

93 Silverado 2500 5.7 ltr, 3" exhaust, high flow cat, muffler, K&N filter.
Hauling around town 10-11mpg
highway unloaded up to 17 mpg

Grassbustin
02-09-2008, 01:04 PM
07 Dodge Cummins 30-K , around 12 to 15. Really depends on your foot....

stuffdeer
02-09-2008, 01:19 PM
2000 S-10
2.2 L 4 Cylinder with a 5-Speed

Loaded Highway- 22-24 MPG
Unloaded Highway- 29+ MPG
Loaded City- 17-20 MPG
Unloaded City- 26-28 MPG

I usually have a very heavy foot, so my spectrum is towards the lower end. However, going easy on the pedal, I have seen the other ratings as well.

cks dad
02-09-2008, 01:54 PM
I have a 06 f150 and i was getting 20 highway and 16 city.I put a cold air induction system in it and now im getting 22 highway 18 city not pulling trailer.Just put it in two months ago and it is worth it.will have to see how it does this spring pulling my trailer.

Exact Rototilling
02-09-2008, 02:02 PM
'00 Nissan Frontier 2.4 / 4 cyl
22mpg Spring-Fall / 20mpg Winter

Possible theory: Cold air is more dense, more atoms/cubic foot - so therefore we're having to drive through a thicker 'sea' of air...

Bingo +1

This is what I was going to say. It's called density altitude. It's part of what a pilot private or commercial is supposed know about and it can be life threatening if it's not respected. A high altitude air strip on a hot day will result in failure to take off depending on the plane thus running out of runway, crashing, dying possibly if you try etc. :hammerhead: You might be able to land but not take off.

If I make enough cash in this business maybe I'll get back into flying - I really miss it.

Also why would pre-08 diesels get better MPG? I was considering getting a Duramax 2500HD at some point.

FWIW here are my mpg #'s:

1985 Toyota 4x4 22r "carb" 4 cylinder manual - 21 mpg empty driving under 62 mph. Mixed driving 17 mpg. Towing a 2,000 trailer 11 mpg or less

1991 4 runner V6 auto tranny. Mixed driving 14 -15 mpg. Towing a 2,000 trailer 10 mpg or less.

GravelyGuy
02-09-2008, 04:28 PM
Possible theory: Cold air is more dense, more atoms/cubic foot - so therefore we're having to drive through a thicker 'sea' of air...


Not the case at all.

Exact Rototilling
02-09-2008, 08:49 PM
Not the case at all.
Any proof of this?

http://www.moneysavingmagnets.com/mpg-in-cold-weather.html

GravelyNut
02-10-2008, 07:09 PM
Any proof of this?

http://www.moneysavingmagnets.com/mpg-in-cold-weather.html

I'll shoot a hole in part of #2 just for the fun of it. I left Rock Hill, NC last year and ran into a snow storm from the NC line all the way to Princeton, WV. Gas mileage still was the same as the summer time trips. Cold weather puts less load on an engine after it reaches normal temps as the engine will not need to use the fan to cool the radiator. Electric fan won't kick in or a fluid clutch won't engage so you pick up the HP from either one not being needed. Heater fan running vs A/C fan running, no difference. Longer time to warm up is the only one that does affect it and if people would just get in and drive, mileage wouldn't be cut by much. The fuel change is about the only one I would buy out of the whole lot as I drive in 15+ MPH winds all the time. We don't worry about winds here until they get above the vehicle speeds.

stroker51
02-10-2008, 08:03 PM
08 and up diesels, powerstrokes, cummins, duramax, all have much stricter emissions restrictions on them than previous models. Like i said earlier, my 96 does pretty good, same for the 99. There is a rancher i know who goes through two pickups every three years, just plumb wears em out. He traded his older 6.0 Powerstroke on an 08 with the 6.4. The power difference was huge, no comparision between the 6.0 and the new technology of the 6.4, but the absolute best he has gotten with the 6.4 is 8 miles per gallon. another guy I know that owns a roofing company traded his trouble free 04 6.0 F250 on an 08, averaged 9 mpg pulling his fish/ski boat down the highway. I would have gotten double that in either of my trucks with that load. I hear the same from some guys I know that work at the dodge and gm dealerships in town too. And as far as weight is concerned regarding topsites, my salt spreader hasn't been off of my 96 all winter, truck weighs about 8300 empty, still pushing 14.5-15 on winter blend diesel with a brick wall on the back, that salt spreader just isn't very aerodynamic. The weight to fuel mileage ratio, in my experience, isn't anywhere near as big of a deal on a diesel truck.

hosejockey2002
02-10-2008, 09:53 PM
I'll shoot a hole in part of #2 just for the fun of it. I left Rock Hill, NC last year and ran into a snow storm from the NC line all the way to Princeton, WV. Gas mileage still was the same as the summer time trips. Cold weather puts less load on an engine after it reaches normal temps as the engine will not need to use the fan to cool the radiator. Electric fan won't kick in or a fluid clutch won't engage so you pick up the HP from either one not being needed. Heater fan running vs A/C fan running, no difference. Longer time to warm up is the only one that does affect it and if people would just get in and drive, mileage wouldn't be cut by much. The fuel change is about the only one I would buy out of the whole lot as I drive in 15+ MPH winds all the time. We don't worry about winds here until they get above the vehicle speeds.

This could be an interesting discussion. I buy the theory that cold air is denser, which increases wind resistance, and could decrease mileage. I also beleive that an engine will run more efficiently in cold weather, once it's warmed up, because again the air is denser. When your talking altitude, the air is less dense up high, and normally aspirated engines run less efficiently and produce less power. On the flip side, I have read that the guys who run turbodiesels actually get better mileage at high altitudes, because their engines are not affected by the altitude, and the air is less dense which makes for less wind resistance. In the summer if you have the A/C running that compressor will take a little extra gas to turn it, but in the winter if you have the defroster on the A/C compressor will also be running. This sounds like a good one for Mythbusters!

GravelyNut
02-10-2008, 10:13 PM
This could be an interesting discussion. I buy the theory that cold air is denser, which increases wind resistance, and could decrease mileage. I also beleive that an engine will run more efficiently in cold weather, once it's warmed up, because again the air is denser. When your talking altitude, the air is less dense up high, and normally aspirated engines run less efficiently and produce less power. On the flip side, I have read that the guys who run turbodiesels actually get better mileage at high altitudes, because their engines are not affected by the altitude, and the air is less dense which makes for less wind resistance. In the summer if you have the A/C running that compressor will take a little extra gas to turn it, but in the winter if you have the defroster on the A/C compressor will also be running. This sounds like a good one for Mythbusters!
Ain't no way Adam gets his hands on my truck. Now Kari might be a different story. :D

As for the A/C compressor, there is a control on the dash that takes care of that. And if the truck's tranny ever gets too hot, first thing that shuts down is the A/C compressor, automatically.

AI Inc
02-10-2008, 10:15 PM
'05 Nissan Titan

....10mpg w/ heavy load

....11mpg w/ my normal maint. equipment in the bed

....15mpg w/ no load on a straight flat run on a perfect day with no head wind and only me in the truck drafting behind a semi. Okay, I'm exagerating, but it sucks in comparison to everyone else's mpgs.:cry:

For some reason I expected a lot more from that , that surprised me.

Fahzu
02-10-2008, 10:59 PM
The sticker said 14city/18hwy. I never see that. I like my Titan, but sometimes wish I had something else.

topsites
02-10-2008, 11:01 PM
Also why would pre-08 diesels get better MPG?.

Probably, most likely because the EPA recently changed their ratings towards today's higher speed limits, there's so much misinformation and down right folklore going around with this stuff, I mean... Bluntly put, mpg means how many miles you get between fill ups divided by the number of gallons YOU put in the tank, and not just once but time after time after time, that's mpg.

So one should ask, how are we getting our figures from actual calculation, and how many are simply taking EPA ratings?
Because it's not the same thing, it never is, and EPA ratings from 1990 vs. today's, it's all just so much hokey pokey they come up with in an enclosed room with a dynamometer hooked to a car to give us an IDEA of what we might expect to get from our particular ride. But in actual performance it varies from one car to the next, maybe not by much but enough to make it worth my while to do my own tracking. So then also boils down to, we can't just calculate mpg when it might be convenient, either it gets calculated all the time or for a good old while or it doesn't, because a short-term calculation is half meaningless as well.

Now I have the numbers for every single fill up for the entire year 2007 how I do things. Not expecting necessarily that everyone else track it like this, no, but please don't fool yourself, better to have the truth staring in the face than trying to lie about it... No harm done here, it's ourselves we hurt when we think our trucks get better mpg than they do in actuality.

Just wanted to say that...:confused:

topsites
02-10-2008, 11:13 PM
It gets better, listen to this nonsense:

I find myself driving better when I know my mpg is being tracked !
Laugh all you want but, why not track it all the time?!

That's what I do, it helps.

GravelyGuy
02-10-2008, 11:35 PM
This sounds like a good one for Mythbusters!


We don't need mythbusters for this. It's so simple, it's really not even worth a debate. When it's cold air is more dense. If more air is entering your engine then your carb/injectors will adjust and use more fuel

This is why you lean engines out in hot weather and richen them in cold. I've been tuning engines for years.

I don't think that driving through more dense air would make a big difference unless your in a semi or something that will get a lot of resistance. I would say less than 1 MPG decrease.

lawnboy dan
02-11-2008, 09:52 AM
whats suprizing here is how low the deisel mpg owners are getting-hardly worth the higher cost to buy. i miss my isuzu pup deisel which got 30 mpg /town and 45-50 hwy

CleanCutProLawn
02-11-2008, 03:02 PM
Also another thing that affect gas in the winter time are the additives. There are additives put in to aid in cold weather start ups. Diesel is blended with #1 to help with gelling, down side is that #1 has less "BTU" persay. With the additives with gas and the richer the engine will run when first started and brought to temp will make the difference also.

GravelyNut
02-11-2008, 03:13 PM
We don't need mythbusters for this. It's so simple, it's really not even worth a debate. When it's cold air is more dense. If more air is entering your engine then your carb/injectors will adjust and use more fuel

This is why you lean engines out in hot weather and richen them in cold. I've been tuning engines for years.

I don't think that driving through more dense air would make a big difference unless your in a semi or something that will get a lot of resistance. I would say less than 1 MPG decrease.
You fail to take into account that when the air is cold and dense, that the ignition also changes to a more advanced spark setting on modern vehicles. If you don't hot/lead foot it, the milage can improve. Or stay the same. Knock sensors on modern gas engines also are continually adjusting for the point just below where knocking will occur. Dense fuel/air mixtures don't require as much of either to get the same work done. And the engine becomes more efficient as there is less pumping loss. On old, carbed engines. with vacuum advance/mechanical only ignitions, what you say was true. EFI and computers have changed that.

As for driving in dense air, I doubt if it would even be that much on a semi. A change in aerodynamics of the truck and trailer would show more loss or gain. Changing to a closer coupling of truck and trailer and closing off the gaps between the two would be a big help. Railroads learned that a long time ago.

CuttinUP
02-11-2008, 04:20 PM
I drive a 2000 Toyota Tacoma extra cab 4 cyl 5 speed. Loaded with 13x5 trailer I average 18-19 mpg. No trailer about 24-25 mpg. If I baby it I can get more, but time is money.

stroker51
02-11-2008, 06:27 PM
[QUOTE=topsites;2146165]Probably, most likely because the EPA recently changed their ratings towards today's higher speed limits, there's so much misinformation and down right folklore going around with this stuff, I mean... Bluntly put, mpg means how many miles you get between fill ups divided by the number of gallons YOU put in the tank, and not just once but time after time after time, that's mpg.


It has nothing to do with speed limits or ratings, it has to do with emissions controls and their real-world detrimental effect on fuel mileage, i get my info straight from my uncle who is a service manager for our International dealership. Also, the ultra low sulfur diesel will hurt fuel mileage as well compared to just low sulfer #2 fuel. It is a fact, at least with these first 08's, that they get worse fuel mileage across the board than the older trucks.

jtkplc
02-11-2008, 06:33 PM
I think it's funny when I hear people with any kind of full size truck say that they get any more then 20mpg. unless you got a chip and all that jazz, i don't believe it. one thing i found out the hard way though, is that smaller is not better if you are hauling. i thought i would downsize and get better mileage since my work truck is also my personal, BAD IDEA. if you are gonna be hauling anything i guess poor fuel mileage is just the price you gotta pay

I think it's funny when I hear about people thinking you can't get 20 mpg with a full size truck. My truck is completely stock. I run Amsoil in the transmission, engine, and differentials.

I track my mileage. Here are the couple times I've tracked it while it was 100% highway driving going between 60-65 mph the entire time using the cruise control. Those figures below are hand calculated and are not using the overhead console reading from the truck's computer. Those numbers are always low. In fact on both occasions listed below it read 17.9 mpg.

May 29, 2006: 277.2 miles on 13.790 gallons which is 19.84 mpg
July 23, 2006: 283.1 miles on 13.929 gallons which is 20.32 mpg

The thing you have to remember is that you can't go 70-75 mph and expect awesome fuel economy from a 7,000lb. truck. The farther I get away from the 65 mph mark the faster my mileage drops. With the Cummins, the closer you get to 2,000 rpm's and beyond the faster your mileage drops as well.

Exact Rototilling
02-11-2008, 06:37 PM
I drive a 2000 Toyota Tacoma extra cab 4 cyl 5 speed. Loaded with 13x5 trailer I average 18-19 mpg. No trailer about 24-25 mpg. If I baby it I can get more, but time is money.

What engine do you have in your Tacoma? Is it the 2.7 liter? How much does your trailer weigh when loaded?

JShe8918
02-11-2008, 06:47 PM
I drive an 05 duramax with an efi live program and get 24 highway, 14 to 15 around town, and about 12.5 towing... Then my 01 Z71 gets 14 on highway, 10 around town, and 7.5 towing. AWEFULL. But before EFI live i was getting 21, 14, and 12.

CuttinUP
02-11-2008, 08:24 PM
What engine do you have in your Tacoma? Is it the 2.7 liter? How much does your trailer weigh when loaded?

I have the 2.4 engine. Not sure on the weight of the trailer loaded but if I had to guess, probably 2000 lbs or so