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View Full Version : Any Lighting Design Ideas? Photos attached.


Venturewest
02-11-2008, 08:49 PM
Here are a few photos from a lighting job I am getting ready to start. I have been to some training but this will be my first design on my own. I will post a few photos with my ideas if you guys have any input.

1) Cross light fountain. My lights need to be far enough back to clear drystack wall?

2)Subtle broad downlight to soften the whole bed.

3)Possible tall pathlight. Not really sure I want that, I am open to suggestions here.

4)Create backlighting for the fountain in this area possibly by uplighting the photinia and juniper in the background.

I would appreciate any input. And I will post a few more areas.
I can't wait to light this up and post some after photos.

Venturewest
02-11-2008, 08:56 PM
Blue Atlas Cedar.

I would like to downlight the blue atlas from the gutters, one light on each side of the cedar to softly illuminate the branches. I dont know if I want to run a wire all the way up the brick though. Any other options?

How would one uplight directly behind the trunk of the cedar look?

Venturewest
02-11-2008, 09:04 PM
Future flagstone patio area. A beautiful group of trees. I was thinking downlighting. It is about a 18' x 18' area from outside radius of trees. Maybe Uplighting on the Japanese maple on the right edge of the grouping, but I don't want to create glare anywhere for the people on the patio.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
02-11-2008, 09:09 PM
Blue Atlas Cedar.

I would like to downlight the blue atlas from the gutters, one light on each side of the cedar to softly illuminate the branches. I dont know if I want to run a wire all the way up the brick though. Any other options?

How would one uplight directly behind the trunk of the cedar look?

I would not downlight this tree from the gutters simply because the tree extends up past the gutters. In so doing you will have some of the tree that is not illuminated.

I would think that one uplight located behind the tree might give it a bit of a gaunt, spooky look. Best to use two or more if this is the way you are going. Personally, I don't think that is a very healthy looking tree. (I am not familiar with that species though) I generally try to avoid bringing attention to foliage that is not close to perfect.

I like your ideas for the fountain area... Are their any other viewing angles that you might be missing?

Regards.

Venturewest
02-11-2008, 09:10 PM
Here is the photo that goes to last post.

irrig8r
02-11-2008, 09:28 PM
I would not downlight this tree from the gutters simply because the tree extends up past the gutters. In so doing you will have some of the tree that is not illuminated.

I would think that one uplight located behind the tree might give it a bit of a gaunt, spooky look. Best to use two or more if this is the way you are going. Personally, I don't think that is a very healthy looking tree. (I am not familiar with that species though) I generally try to avoid bringing attention to foliage that is not close to perfect.

I like your ideas for the fountain area... Are their any other viewing angles that you might be missing?

Regards.

The cedar looks OK. It's main problem is its location... I wouldn't ever plant it so close to a structure knowing that it will normally grow to a mature height of maybe 70 to 100 ft. tall.

Far from windows, out in the yard it could be dramatically lit from below... where it is growing is more challenging in so many ways...

Venturewest
02-11-2008, 09:40 PM
I would not downlight this tree from the gutters simply because the tree extends up past the gutters. In so doing you will have some of the tree that is not illuminated.

I would think that one uplight located behind the tree might give it a bit of a gaunt, spooky look. Best to use two or more if this is the way you are going. Personally, I don't think that is a very healthy looking tree. (I am not familiar with that species though) I generally try to avoid bringing attention to foliage that is not close to perfect.

I like your ideas for the fountain area... Are their any other viewing angles that you might be missing?

Regards.
Thanks for the response. Not illuminating the top was my big hesitation on the cedar even though the main viewing of the foliage would be from inside or the patio. The wooden deck area to the right is another possible viewing area. The tree is actually healthy. People here go crazy for these trees and unfortunately they are usually planted way to close to structures such as this one.

I thought about uplighting on each side of the tree also, but I was afraid that would be a problem when it is so close to the concrete patio.

Venturewest
02-11-2008, 10:52 PM
Here is an overview of the area from the patio.

Mark B
02-11-2008, 11:01 PM
My .02 cut the tree down, then maybe light the door from the gutter. OR Pete would love to see you light up brink there in between the windows. Again my .02

Pro-Scapes
02-11-2008, 11:08 PM
That Cedar doesnt need a light it needs a new home. Move it or get rid of it. Your best move here would be to demo. Hard to say if your tree lights would work for the patio area. Depends on your lamp choice... the intended use of the area and the hieght in which you will be mounting the fixture.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
02-12-2008, 08:03 AM
Rather then simply moonlighting the patio area as you show in your picture, why not softly illuminate the entire zone? It would all a lot of depth to the view from the home.

Also... "more fries with that?"... ask the client if they would be interested in lighting the play structure for the kids. You could do a independantly switched zone there... making it a fun, safe, intriguing 'after dark' destination for the children.

Regards.

Venturewest
02-12-2008, 10:54 AM
Rather then simply moonlighting the patio area as you show in your picture, why not softly illuminate the entire zone? It would all a lot of depth to the view from the home.

Also... "more fries with that?"... ask the client if they would be interested in lighting the play structure for the kids. You could do a independantly switched zone there... making it a fun, safe, intriguing 'after dark' destination for the children.
Regards.

When you say softly illuminate the entire zone are you still talking about moonlighting techniques, but just more more lights highlighting more areas at more angles? That is my thought, limited by budget of course. You can see there are several groups of trees that I didn't specifically mention that I am also planning on moonlighting from.

The playset would be a nice ad on. I will definitely sell a transformer with a capacity for expansion later on.

I am probably going to go with Vista as that is my best support here. Any suggestions on fixtures?

Mike & Lucia
02-12-2008, 09:15 PM
The cedar looks OK. It's main problem is its location... I wouldn't ever plant it so close to a structure knowing that it will normally grow to a mature height of maybe 70 to 100 ft. tall.

Far from windows, out in the yard it could be dramatically lit from below... where it is growing is more challenging in so many ways...

Thanks Greg, for saying that so well. I was ready to lambaste the amateur who put that gorgeous tree there and guaranteed the client the heartache of cutting it down in a few years! Unreal!

Mike

Venturewest
02-12-2008, 11:58 PM
Thanks Greg, for saying that so well. I was ready to lambaste the amateur who put that gorgeous tree there and guaranteed the client the heartache of cutting it down in a few years! Unreal!

Mike


LOL...I agree completely, the tree should have never been planted there. It will inevitably come out in the next few years. It is much too common a scene here. People love that sparse looking innocent blue tree. They love it so much the tuck it right up against the house, and a few years later you have what we see here.

OKAY so now that we have that out of the way, how about some other design ideas for the remaining areas?