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mrfixit
02-13-2008, 03:24 PM
Simplicty Soveriegn 7100. I have what appears to be a power issue. When mower deck is engaged and going up hill the tractor boggs down.

Simplicity Sovereign Lawn and Garden Tractor
tractor Mfg.#1692943. It is a 1997 model
The deck is a 48" cut and the model # is 1691219
This tractor has been re-powered with a top of the line Kohler CH25S
The engine spec# is 68544
Disp 25?
Serial Engine#2633815377

I have it in the shop since November and stopped by last week was told that it might be a control unit. Because the engine was running on one cylinder. My question, is it worth the investment?
My concern, Considering there may be more wrong with cylinder.
$200 controller plus engine removal.

Landrus2
02-13-2008, 03:42 PM
How many hours on engine.

mrfixit
02-13-2008, 03:50 PM
Can't say? No hour meter. Came from another tractor before I ended up with the tractor. Looks heavily used.

Landrus2
02-13-2008, 03:53 PM
Check your compression. see the difference between both cylinders.

mrfixit
02-13-2008, 08:23 PM
If I find the compression different than how much $$ for a rebuild? Assuming it needs a rebuild?

Would it be possible to do it myself? I need to decide if I it is worth the fix?

Landrus2
02-13-2008, 09:40 PM
If you never did a rebuilt. it’s asking a little to much just watch your torque settings. watch your ring to cylinder gaps. As far as rebuilt kits with gaskets they going to range from $200 to $250 depends where you buy. If you decide to rebuilt and need help feel free to ask.:drinkup:

mrfixit
02-14-2008, 09:52 AM
A few more questions.
The rebuilt kits you mention, do they include cylinders/heads? Assume gaskets?
What should I expect to pay someone to do this work? Labor? Parts?

And the controller that was mentioned by my mechanic he says $200/part $600/Labor?

With all this should I just throw in the towel or is there somewhere I can get a reasonible price on a engine?

sawman65
02-14-2008, 01:52 PM
If you never did a rebuilt. it’s asking a little to much just watch your torque settings. watch your ring to cylinder gaps. As far as rebuilt kits with gaskets they going to range from $200 to $250 depends where you buy. If you decide to rebuilt and need help feel free to ask.:drinkup:


kohler recomends not to rebuild the comand engine and even if you did it would cost 600-800 for the parts alone. there are no kits to do this.
my first question would be did you take it to a kohler dealer? one that has a master mechanic that went to the kohler school? there are leakdown tests that will tell you exactly what is wrong with that engine. and a tester to test coils and the sam (spark advance module) the controler that you speak of.IF that is the problem those things run about 75-85 dollars list price. now the labor is another story it will take 3 hours tops to just remove the engine. if that is how they will go about it.me i just pull the drive shaft off the front then pull the bolts from the shroud of the engine the tip the shroud forward./i can then get to the coils and the wireing to the sam. i still charge the flat rate as all shops will r & r(remove and replace) i think is 5.5 hr so yes the labor is high. then again its a simplicity and everthing is high.

and joe keep on drinking bud lol!

mrfixit
02-14-2008, 02:50 PM
Is there anyone interested from Western PA to take on such a project? or where can I find an engine that will work. Horizontal shaft (rear of engine) and exhaust in front.

mrfixit
02-14-2008, 03:09 PM
18hp only required not 25
Is there anyone interested from Western PA to take on such a project? or where can I find an engine that will work. Horizontal shaft (rear of engine) and exhaust in front.

Landrus2
02-14-2008, 03:50 PM
kohler recomends not to rebuild the comand engine and even if you did it would cost 600-800 for the parts alone. there are no kits to do this.
my first question would be did you take it to a kohler dealer? one that has a master mechanic that went to the kohler school? there are leakdown tests that will tell you exactly what is wrong with that engine. and a tester to test coils and the sam (spark advance module) the controler that you speak of.IF that is the problem those things run about 75-85 dollars list price. now the labor is another story it will take 3 hours tops to just remove the engine. if that is how they will go about it.me i just pull the drive shaft off the front then pull the bolts from the shroud of the engine the tip the shroud forward./i can then get to the coils and the wireing to the sam. i still charge the flat rate as all shops will r & r(remove and replace) i think is 5.5 hr so yes the labor is high. then again its a simplicity and everthing is high.

and joe keep on drinking bud lol!

I can see that you are not familiar with these engines. I can see that your expertise is in the chicken farm.

mrfixit
02-14-2008, 09:48 PM
Yes, this is what I am talking about, apic is worth alot of words. Today I thought I was looking for a new engine. Still waiting on my compression test. Any idea on cylinders$$?

rebuilt kits with gaskets they going to range from $200 to $250 depends where you buy

sawman65
02-15-2008, 09:09 AM
i refuse to have a war of wits with an unarmed person.but i will play along somewhat. that is two pistons,rods and a gasket kit. NOT a rebuild kit those pistons are marked STD that is a standard piston not an overbore you have turned the packs of rings around to hide that fact also for a rebuild you have to bore the cylinders they are not replaceable wheres the lifters,valves, do you not replace them also? shoot anyone can go pull parts off the shelf and take a pick. what is the part # for said kit?
oh and by the way i have been raiseing game fowl for 5 years.been a kohler trained mechanic since 83

sawman65
02-15-2008, 10:04 AM
10.3
Section 10
Inspection and Reconditioning
10
Check the cylinder bore wall for scoring. In severe
cases, unburned fuel can cause scuffing and scoring of
the cylinder wall. It washes the necessary lubricating
oils off the piston and cylinder wall. As raw fuel seeps
down the cylinder wall, the piston rings make metal to
metal contact with the wall. Scoring of the cylinder
wall can also be caused by localized hot spots
resulting from blocked cooling fins or from
inadequate or contaminated lubrication.
If the cylinder bore is badly scored, excessively worn,
tapered, or out-of-round, resizing is necessary. Use an
inside micrometer to determine the amount of wear
(refer to the “Specifications, Tolerances, and Special
Torque Values”, in Section 1), then select the nearest
suitable oversize of either 0.25 mm (0.010 in.) or
0.50 mm (0.020 in.). Resizing to one of these oversizes
will allow usage of the available oversize piston and
ring assemblies. First, resize using a boring bar, then
use the following procedures for honing the cylinder.
NOTE: Some CH25-26 engines feature POWERBORE
™ cylinders a special patented nickelsilicone
plating process for increased power,
superior oil control, reduced exhaust
emission, and virtually permanent cylinder
life. POWER-BORE™ cylinders cannot be
resized or honed as described in the
following procedure. If a plated cylinder bore
is damaged or out of specification, use a new
miniblock or short block to repair the engine.
Use the following procedure for crankcases
with a cast iron sleeve.
Honing
While most commercially available cylinder hones
can be used with either portable drills or drill
presses, the use of a low speed drill press is preferred
as it facilitates more accurate alignment of the bore in
relation to the crankshaft crossbore. Honing is best
accomplished at a drill speed of about 250 RPM and
60 strokes per minute. After installing coarse stones in
hone, proceed as follows:
1. Lower hone into bore and after centering, adjust
so the stones are in contact with the cylinder
wall. Use of a commercial cutting-cooling agent
is recommended.
2. With the lower edge of each stone positioned
even with the lowest edge of the bore, start drill
and honing process. Move the hone up and down
while resizing to prevent the formation of
cutting ridges. Check the size frequently.
Figure 10-3. Cylinder Bore Crosshatch after
Honing.
4. After resizing, check the bore for roundness,
taper, and size. Use an inside micrometer,
telescoping gauge, or bore gauge to take
measurements. The measurements should be
taken at three locations in the cylinder – at the
top, middle, and bottom. Two measurements
should be taken (perpendicular to each other) at
each of the three locations.
Clean Cylinder Bore After Honing
Proper cleaning of the cylinder walls following boring
and/or honing is very critical to a successful overhaul.
Machining grit left in the cylinder bore can destroy an
engine in less than one hour of operation after a
rebuild.
NOTE: Kohler pistons are custom-machined to
exacting tolerances. When oversizing a
cylinder, it should be machined exactly
0.25 mm (0.010 in.) or 0.50 mm (0.020 in.)
over the new diameter (Section 1). The
corresponding oversize Kohler replacement
piston will then fit correctly.
3. When the bore is within 0.064 mm (0.0025 in.) of
the desired size, remove the coarse stones and
replace them with burnishing stones. Continue
with the burnishing stones until the bore is
within 0.013 mm (0.0005 in.) of the desired size
and then use finish stones (220-280 grit) and
polish the bore to its final size. A crosshatch
should be observed if honing is done correctly.
The crosshatch should intersect at approximately
23°-33° off the horizontal. Too flat an angle could
cause the rings to skip and wear excessively, and
too steep an angle will result in high oil
consumption. See Figure 10-3.

notice it say powerbore by his spec# that is the engine he is dealing with and they can not be resized. any more questions?