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View Full Version : Installing trickle charger to my dump trailer - need some guidance!


rawtoxic
03-05-2008, 06:29 PM
Hi I have a 2001 dodge 2500 and a 2007 texas pride dump trailer, I would like to install a trickle charger but cannot find good directions to do it myself anywhere on the WWW is there another name for a trickle charger I should know to search for? I have the standard 7 way RV plug I understand the center is hot - what size wire do I use - do I need a in-line fuse - does my Dodge need a fuse added like a newer chevy to function properly - do you connect just to the + of the battery?

I appreciate any light you can shed to this problem. I do understand some people idea to run straight off battery or under hood I am light user and think the trickle charge would satisfy my dumping needs.

Side question:
Does anyone use these solar units successfully the way our stuff gets beat up I can't imagine a solar panel lasting too long anyways. It is damn sunny in Colorado though!

Thanks everyone!

mike lane lawn care
03-05-2008, 10:15 PM
try maintenance charger, sears sells them for like $40 and they are easy to hook up.

GravelyNut
03-06-2008, 05:15 AM
Try also, float charger. Trickle chargers stay at a fix rate ( about .5 amp or so ) while float chargers turn themselves on or off as needed to maintain s fully charged battery.

meador56
03-07-2008, 10:16 AM
Run a hot wire from the tow truck battery through the plug and charge on the go.:rolleyes:

rawtoxic
03-08-2008, 01:22 AM
Hmmm... I am still not finding anything I am NOT LOOKING for a way to charge using a standard 110 plug in I rarely have my dump trailer at my house.

So is it impossible to have the battery charge simply using the 7 way RV plug with some modifications made? Thanks for the reply Meador56 it was the best response can you provide some further installation details like what part of the plug I should use?

I just want someone to explain how to do this for me or provide a link explaining how (I can't find one for the life of me!)

Please help!

desii
03-08-2008, 01:45 AM
Try this:

http://www.marksrv.com/wiring.htm

I don't think you want a trickle charger, I think your trying to re-charge your "back-up" battery for you trailer brakes...correct? (For your break away hook up?)

Anyway, the link above has some pretty good info...hope it helps.

desii
03-08-2008, 01:54 AM
In searching some sites to help you, I found this description of a brake away kit (huh):

Curts Soft-Trac II Breakaway System non only when meets, if it be not that exceeds the Department of Transportation's specifications concerning breakaway systems. Curts Breakaway System is intended during the term of habituate on exclusive, in tandem and tri-axel trailers fitted out in company with electrical brakes. Breakaway Soft-Trac0 tin put on on whatever jack up carry or A-frame in the opinion of Quick unitary deadbolt installing outside of boring. Most states order Soft-Trac1 shift according to divide force furnish at what time towing a house trailer. Comes by the agency of Soft-Trac2 caseful and mounting bracket out, 12v certain rechargeable Soft-Trac3 nylon Soft-Trac4 change and in contrast with or Soft-Trac5 12v Soft-Trac6 Soft-Trac7


That is cut & paste directly from http://inpcars.com/brake-controls/2.html

It must have been written during the writer's strike...LOL.

Gravel Rat
03-08-2008, 02:25 AM
Trickle chargers are bad for batteries the best is a charger that gives it a quck hot charge. If you are using a deep cycle RV battery you need to draw that sucker down to its almost flat and recharge it.

Shadetree Ltd
03-08-2008, 03:01 AM
The answer is yes, there is a hot/charge wire in the 7 way plug that will charge the trailer battery. http://www.dieseltruckresource.com/dev/showthread.php?t=193965&highlight=trailer+wiring If you don't find your answer in this thread search the forums there and you will find an answer.

rawtoxic
03-08-2008, 09:23 AM
yes that's what I've been looking for - the CHARGE CIRCUIT! I want to charge my dump trailer battery.

Is it a big mistake to not let the deep cycle battery run all the way dead? it seems to die when I need it most like at the dump 15 minutes before they close with huge chunks of concrete in it. A battery will still last a couple years? Or just pull the fuse when I don't need the trailer charging?

Thanks for helping me figure this out.

So basically I gather this is what I should do:

1) See if my truck wiring harness has a + battery connection run to the truck side of the 7 way RV plug, if not run a new + cable w a 10 gauge wire from the battery (Side question: which battery on a 2 battery dodge 2001 cummins?)
2) Install fuse in truck if needed to complete circuit
3) This is where I am a bit timid, install wire from trailer wiring harness to battery postive to create a charge?

desii
03-08-2008, 10:30 AM
Sorry, I completely misunderstood. Plus, it didn't know that dump trailers only worked from there own battery. I thought you were talking about the little break away battery. Anyway, I hope youv'e got it figured out now.

BrandonV
03-08-2008, 11:05 AM
just put a solar pannel on it.

rawtoxic
03-08-2008, 12:00 PM
do you know from experience that the solar panel can charge enough for a few dumps a week?

from the ones I read into most say something similar to "Compensates for small steady battery drains."

keeblerbp
03-08-2008, 12:06 PM
If I were you I would just use the hot wire in the 7 prong plug as your charge wire. I don't know about Dodge but chevy is wired through the fuse panel under the hood. I would check the owners manual to see if this wire has a fuse installed at the factory or if you need to install one. By this I don't mean run any wires, I just mean to put a fuse in a pre-marked location in the fuse panel. Some of the chevy's didn't have a fuse from the factory, but it did have a place for one. I would recommend a fuse in the hot wire for too much current draw if something shorts out or if the hoist would happen to draw too much (should't be a problem). With the hot wire of the truck hooked to the trailer battery it will keep the battery charged as long as the truck is plugged into the trailer.

Shadetree Ltd
03-08-2008, 12:07 PM
All you have to do is test the plug for the charge circuit. I don't know if it is constant or if it is only on with the ignition. Either way that sight will have all the answers and more for your Dodge. Using that circuit and will be fine for keeping the battery fresh provided all your work isn't only a couple of miles from home. It would also help if the truck was left running when using the dump. Replacing trailer batteries every couple of years is part of ongoing preventative maintenance. I have never used a solar charger, but once a year do pull the batteries and have them tested and slow charged overnight just to make sure they are fresh. A slow charge of 2A does better than a quick charge I thought, I could be wrong though.

Shadetree Ltd
03-08-2008, 12:09 PM
keeblerbp is completely right with the above advice.

BrandonV
03-08-2008, 01:10 PM
the solar pannel will keep it maintained you need to run a wire fronvyour truck for acutally dumping.

Gravel Rat
03-08-2008, 03:02 PM
If you are running a deep cycle battery which you should be for a dump trailer like I meantioned you need to run them really low then bring them back up hence the name deep cycle. A deep cycle battery isn't meant for hard cranking like starting. A deep cycle gives even power to almost discharge.

Some battery chargers have a deep cycle battery setting.

A trickle charger only puts out low amps something like 1-2 it never gets the electrons going. So what happens is your battery suphides up and eventually kills it. You can try revive a battery by giving it a hot charge but you need a good battery charger with a high amp boost.

I know its a pain but the best way to store a battery is take it off put it in a cool dry well ventilated area and maybe put a 10 amp charger on it.

Charging the battery off the truck your towing it with is okay but your loading up your alternator and if its not designed to do so it will shorten the life. Then with the new electronic crap and sensors you get a power spike it might short something out.

If your running out of batter juice put a 8D deep cycle Surrette marine battery on the trailer heavy as h*ll but will last all year :laugh:

Sweet Tater
03-08-2008, 08:59 PM
In searching some sites to help you, I found this description of a brake away kit (huh):

Curts Soft-Trac II Breakaway System non only when meets, if it be not that exceeds the Department of Transportation's specifications concerning breakaway systems. Curts Breakaway System is intended during the term of habituate on exclusive, in tandem and tri-axel trailers fitted out in company with electrical brakes. Breakaway Soft-Trac0 tin put on on whatever jack up carry or A-frame in the opinion of Quick unitary deadbolt installing outside of boring. Most states order Soft-Trac1 shift according to divide force furnish at what time towing a house trailer. Comes by the agency of Soft-Trac2 caseful and mounting bracket out, 12v certain rechargeable Soft-Trac3 nylon Soft-Trac4 change and in contrast with or Soft-Trac5 12v Soft-Trac6 Soft-Trac7


That is cut & paste directly from http://inpcars.com/brake-controls/2.html

It must have been written during the writer's strike...LOL.

Sounds more like the writer was smoking something serious.

spye
03-10-2008, 05:50 PM
Quoted from gravel rat:

A trickle charger only puts out low amps something like 1-2 it never gets the electrons going. So what happens is your battery suphides up and eventually kills it. You can try revive a battery by giving it a hot charge but you need a good battery charger with a high amp boost.

I know its a pain but the best way to store a battery is take it off put it in a cool dry well ventilated area and maybe put a 10 amp charger on it.

Charging the battery off the truck your towing it with is okay but your loading up your alternator and if its not designed to do so it will shorten the life. Then with the new electronic crap and sensors you get a power spike it might short something out.



What has been said above is almost entirely true. What kills batteries is the sulfides that build up on the plates and kill the surface area of the lead. In other words like a sponge that is painted and cannot soak up water.

A trickle charge is a good way to keep a battery charged but it does not keep the sulfides from building up. Every time a battery is discharged (a dump cycle) and then recharged with trickle or other means it gains sulfides on the plates. The best way that I have found (why I am now a distributor of the product) is the pulsing technology. Pulsing technology actually charges the battery and also pulses the battery with a seperate charge (about 2 amps 20,000 times a second) to break down the sulfide buildup. I sell these units with a solar panel to the dump trailer industry currently and they have done very well. FEMA is currently installing these on all their trailers (Reefers and lift gates) to maintain the batteries while not in use.

The solar panels that I deal (2 watt, 5 watt, and 6 watt) are not enough to completely recharge a battery that sees 7-10 dumps a week but if you are using say 5-7 times per week then the 5 watt would be the one, anything less than 5 and the 2 watt should suffice. Plus on top of all that the battery will last at least 3 times the normal average. I have customers that are using this technology that have not replaced a battery in 10 years. Not trying to put a sales pitch on anybody its just a great technology that I learned about and I preach it as much as I can. I use it on everything I own.

PM me with any questions


Sid

Sweet Tater
03-18-2008, 04:57 PM
just put a solar pannel on it.

I just bought a solar charger from NAPA for $30 for mine.
I was having the same issue.

muddstopper
03-18-2008, 05:33 PM
In your very first post you mentioned the center prong in a 7pin rv plug being hot. It is not. The center prong is to wire in backup lights on trailers and is only hot when you are in reverse. If you are looking into the rvplug socket, the flatblade on the top right will be your chargeing wire and is or should be always hot. Running a wire thru your pigtail so it matches this blade on the socket and the other end to your dump trailer battery will let you charge the trailer battery while you are towing it. There are two standard methods for wireing a RV connection.. In nether method is the center pin always hot. If yours is, its wired wrong.

http://horsetrailerworld.com/home/wiring.asp

Ramairfreak98ss
03-19-2008, 01:55 AM
haha, I read this post and almost thought it was one i wrote a long time ago!

I have a new dump trailer from last spring, has a big Interstate deep cycle bat in it. I know the battery is good, but the problem i found was, even if you use the dump cycle even a few times in a day, say in like a 6 hr span, even if the truck is charging it from site to mulch pickup place and back, 1hr span, it doesnt charge enough.

The dump trailers, ive found, pull between 150-300 amps of 12v power from the battery PER dump. The heavier the load the more amps. AND, if your truck is suppplying 12v through the 7way adapter while its dumping, and your battery doesnt have a descent charge left.. it will either A. Blow the fuse going to the solenoid in the trailer battery or B. blow your dash fuse on the truck end.

My 06 F350 has a fuse dedicated to this line in the 7 way adapter, and yes it had blown twice before i realized what was going on.

I also blew the trailer pump fuse too twice. Easy thing is, when its dumping, i touch the charge red wire that the fuseable link is on, if it starts to feel hot, i know its pulling too much from the truck and somethings gonna blow.

I just unplug from the truck and it cant pull from there anymore while dumping.

I think my truck only charges the battery with something rediculously low like 2amp output. Well if you just pulled out 200 amps for a minute straight while dumping 10k in dirt/mulch... its gonna take a few hours while the truck is hooked up and running to charge er back up full.

I havnt run into this problem for a while now, mainly because i know how to work it, dont ever let the fuses blow so i know its charging 100% of the time now when the truck is on and just for good measure i throw the 10amp charger on it for a few hours. If i was using it all day long doing work, and had a lot of up/down cycles, either charge it after that day with a AC charger or do what im going to do.

My Boss salt spreader has a nice thicker 10ga power wire that runs from the control box up front to the back hitch. Im getting an extra Boss harness wire adapter to plug into the battery on the dump trailer, so when i pull it ever, i just hook up the extra charge wire and then flip on the spreader to "full" or most amps and that will charge it a ton faster, more like 20-50amps not 2.