PDA

View Full Version : How to become a lighting designer?


seolatlanta
04-11-2008, 06:40 PM
Ok here a good question for us to work on instead of us taking shots at each other , although that is fun sometimes.

How does one become a highend , trained , lighting designer. I mean are there schools , classes , seminars, internships that one can do to become a designer such as Greg Yale and others that we all know about.

I know there is a class at Rutgers , and maybe there are others as well. I also know that some here have trained under one of the masters of our trade. I just was reading an online article about these folks and it got me thinking about how they got there. How do you get where you are consistently doing projects over 50-100K?

something to think about....

If there are some classes that you took or something that you have done that you want to keep on the downlow , PM me.

Eden Lights
04-11-2008, 06:57 PM
Do your undergrad work in the field of choice: architecture, art, electrical engineering, interior design, and etc. Then pick your favorite masters program in lighting and try to get in. My choice would be Parsons, Penn State, and Rensselar, but that's just a few. If I was coaching someone along I would go for a Art heavy program with a minor in EE or Artchitecture and then Grad work at Parsons for lighting.

pete scalia
04-11-2008, 09:51 PM
C'mon let's be serious here. Outdoor lighting design is not a difficult art and can be perfected by many with a little experimentation. The same design principles of landscape, interior, design etc. apply. Observe good lighting. It's easy to distinguish from the bad. Not how the fixtures are positioned and what lamps/beamspreads are used. Move fixtures around on your own yard and those of clients until you get it right. When is it right? When the person/s who is paying says it is. This is certainly not brain surgery and quality or success has more to do with subjectivity than anything else. Read Nate's book and he'll make a lighting designer out of you. It's very simple 3 levels of light and some different effects. You don't need to be a Rhodes scholar for this. You mention Greg Yale. Well you should be mentioning Pete Scalia. Pete Scalia doesn't go "flitting" around Long Island and Pete's loafers are not light if you get my drift. Pete put's Yale to shame every day of the week. I'm the big man out in the Hamptons not Yale. Put that in your pipe and smoke it.

Eden Lights
04-11-2008, 11:01 PM
C'mon let's be serious here. Outdoor lighting design is not a difficult art and can be perfected by many with a little experimentation. The same design principles of landscape, interior, design etc. apply. Observe good lighting. It's easy to distinguish from the bad. Not how the fixtures are positioned and what lamps/beamspreads are used. Move fixtures around on your own yard and those of clients until you get it right. When is it right? When the person/s who is paying says it is. This is certainly not brain surgery and quality or success has more to do with subjectivity than anything else. Read Nate's book and he'll make a lighting designer out of you. It's very simple 3 levels of light and some different effects. You don't need to be a Rhodes scholar for this. You mention Greg Yale. Well you should be mentioning Pete Scalia. Pete Scalia doesn't go "flitting" around Long Island and Pete's loafers are not light if you get my drift. Pete put's Yale to shame every day of the week. I'm the big man out in the Hamptons not Yale. Put that in your pipe and smoke it.

I would agree with you Pete, except for the part about your work since we have never seen it?:)

pete scalia
04-11-2008, 11:54 PM
I would agree with you Pete, except for the part about your work since we have never seen it?:)

You'll have to take my word I'm the best believe thee me. They come from miles around to see my work. I was almost in architectural digest and I almost got martha Stewart's job until that fancy pants Yale stole it out from under me. He Asked to see my bid and under cut me by a couple of sheckles. I think that just about proves I'm good. Don't get me started about that Yale. He comes in there with his short shorts in the summer and spandex in the spring and fall. Give me a break Jake.

Dreams To Designs
04-12-2008, 10:15 AM
Lighting design is an art, and you either have the talent for it or you don't. There are plenty of technicians out there installing lighting and their installs are quite good, but the design is very poor. Quality lighting involves more than a bunch of fixtures shining up at a mcmansion to show it off to the neighbors. If you don't understand architecture, plants and the landscaping purpose you should stick to cutting grass.

Some of the very good lighting designers have a background in theatrical lighting. Lighting a stage to create a scene is a talent that is inherent and fine tuned with practice.Understanding and appreciating art is also an important aspect of design. If you can't appreciate what you are trying to light, than why light it.

Kirk

Pro-Scapes
04-12-2008, 10:22 AM
I agree with Kirk on alot of what he said. I think knowledge of plants including seasonal habits of them as well as growth habits of them is very important.

it does not have to be all raw talent. It can be an aquired skill IF you are dedicated to your art and really care about the end portrait. All to often here I see lights placed in the outer edges of a bed pointed hap hazzardly at the house. Yes, once the plants mature its more or less a nightmare.

seolatlanta
04-12-2008, 10:25 AM
Just so we are clear here , I am talking about someone who has some knowledge, not a mow& blow guy.

I just find it interesting how some of these people are considered top level ( I wont mention names ) & I think some of their work is no better or creative than a smaller designer working out of his house. I guess it is how they have marketed & presented themselves.

David Gretzmier
04-12-2008, 12:00 PM
I think the title of Lighting designer should come with more than just a working knowledge of outdoor lighting. I would not consider a person who works or even owns for a landscape company for 5 years, even 10 years installing plants a landscape designer. just because you can sew, and sew well, does not make you a fashion designer. automotive designer, computer sysytems designer,etc.

all these "designers" have something in common, they can create on paper a design drawn to scale. that requires not only talent, but a degree of skill taught by years in the classroom. to communicate through paper a vision of what should be done. A lighting designer, however, may not be a good lighting installer. many folks that are good with pen and ink are not so good with a shovel.

I worked part time with Citigroup a few years back and the finance industry is really careful about throwing around names. financial advisor, consultant, analyst, designer, all have legal connotations dealing with your degree, experience, passing testing, and ability in the finance field. It would be nice if the lighting industry had the same value behind the names we give ourselves.

NightLightingFX
04-12-2008, 03:55 PM
Get involved with the AOLP - where else can you get to know and talk to the likes of: Nate Mullen, Tom Williams, Nels Petersen, Paul Gosslin, Mike Gambino, and alot of other great professionals. I have had the pleasure to get a lot of GREAT info and mentoring from Tom Williams. If you are serious about outdoor lighting and want to learn more about the industry. I think the AOLP is a great place to start.
~Ned

Lite4
04-12-2008, 11:00 PM
[QUOTE=David Gretzmier;2266448]

all these "designers" have something in common, they can create on paper a design drawn to scale. that requires not only talent, but a degree of skill taught by years in the classroom. to communicate through paper a vision of what should be done. A lighting designer, however, may not be a good lighting installer. many folks that are good with pen and ink are not so good with a shovel.

QUOTE]

Kirk, Well spoken.
David, Some of the worst landscape designs come from veteran LA's. Just because you have a piece of paper proving you can absorb knowledge about plants, hardscape, hydraulics and spacial management , does not mean you have a sense about design at all. Sure they will teach you some of the basics, but only the architects that actually get out in the field and put their methods to work so to speak will soon realize what works and what does not. Most of these architects' designs are stale and always the same. They never vary the plant palletes and their designs are similar from job to job simply because they can cut and paste and send a bill. I can literally go down a street with commercial properties in my area and tell you which architect designed them. There is no creativity among them except for a few rare exceptions. Please understand I mean no disrespect, but from my many years of experience designing landscapes one always needs to be pushing the envelope of what could be and thinking outside the box. The good designers can design a project in their minds eye and walk through it and see all the plants and the hardscapes. They can see the mature plantings as they will look in 10, 15, and 20 years. They can visualize the waterfalls and patios. They can detect potential problems by walking through the completed project as they see it in their mind. They can see and smell the jasmine hanging from the pergola long before a shovel ever breaks the earth. This takes a profound knowledge of plant material and hardscapes, along with a deep knowledge of how to work with the different medias. No architect that sits in a 10 x 10 cubicle has this background to assist them without having actually spent time in the field.
The same is true in lighting. Often times though we are not given much to work with when lighting. Around here most of the landscapes are very sparse and there is not much else to light but the architecture of the house along with trying to tie it to the landscape as best as we possibly can. Some of the most challenging situations for me are trying to find something to light when there is literally nothing much in the front yard other than grass. The "better homes and gardens" landscapes are a breeze. There is usually such a vast array of interesting plant material and garden structures that putting together a lighting portrait is a piece of cake. Like I always say, "How can you light something that isn't there?"
Whew, my fingers are tired.

klkanders
04-13-2008, 12:12 AM
Well said Tim!
So gathering all the opinions stated thus far is it safe to say a lighting designer can emerge from many different backgrounds? As Tim stated some of the worst designs he has seen have come from veteran LA's. Would they have the ability to be a great lighting designer? If they leave their 10x10 cubicle and play around in the mulch, behind shrubs, up trees, moving lights, experimenting, etc., then yes they could be. The same is true for anyone whatever background they have come from. I know for a fact many of us here have very very diverse resumes. I believe then it all comes down to desire and wanting to do it the right way...never being satisfied, always wanting to make the next project better than the last.

I can't count the number of times when viewing slides at the AOLP conference I heard different designers state " I wish I would have done this a little bit different." Or they would rethink their design when someone pointed out or challenged something. Were they wrong to have done it that way? Is it not the eye of the beholder that matters? Well what about the one that writes the check?

Keith
Landscape lighting:
salesman,
purchaser,
designer,
installer,
service and maintenance advisor,
bookkeeper,
customer care specialist,
owner

Keith

NightScenes
04-13-2008, 08:59 AM
Gee thanks Ned for mentioning me on your list, I just try to help out if I can. Anyway, I think I understand where the thread was initially aimed and here's my take. From the VERY beginning of my venture into this field I was determined to be in that upper tier, not that I am there yet. I have studied hard but I have also made sure to put the word out that I am a "specialist" and a "designer". I NEVER use the term contractor when talking to clients and I am not an installer either. It is also VERY rare that I will do a design on the spot. I talk to clients in designer terms like "depth and interest" and I tell them how the eye captures light. I make sure that they know that they are not dealing with an armature. When you do this, the word gets out and you find that the phone is ringing with serious clients and you start getting much larger projects.

Anyway, I think this is where you start that climb and set yourself apart from the rest.

pete scalia
04-13-2008, 09:13 AM
Get involved with the AOLP - where else can you get to know and talk to the likes of: Nate Mullen, Tom Williams, Nels Petersen, Paul Gosslin, Mike Gambino, and alot of other great professionals

Nate's the only one of these I've ever heard of these no names and guaranteed Pete has out earned and out performed each and every one of them last yr.

NightScenes
04-13-2008, 11:49 AM
I definitely think that the AOLP is a great place to meet and talk to the best in the industry. I also think that the new design certification will really separate the pros from the rest of the field.

NiteTymeIlluminations
04-13-2008, 07:44 PM
I think you spend some time all over the world learning from the best and realizing that you knwo nothing until you do it for 8-10 years and can be considered a lighting designer.

I have been compelely and utterly humbled by the people I have lewt this year. Hate to say it but none of them have anything to do with AOLP. Good starting place for sure but if you are serious about being a lighting designer start looking for an intern ship oversees.

pete scalia
04-13-2008, 08:00 PM
I think you spend some time all over the world learning from the best and realizing that you knwo nothing until you do it for 8-10 years and can be considered a lighting designer.

I have been compelely and utterly humbled by the people I have lewt this year. Hate to say it but none of them have anything to do with AOLP. Good starting place for sure but if you are serious about being a lighting designer start looking for an intern ship oversees.

So your dissing the AOLP and saying that overseas contractors are superior to those in the states?

NightScenes
04-13-2008, 08:05 PM
Doug, are you saying that we should leave our families to fend for themselves while we head overseas for a non paying job???

Chris J
04-13-2008, 10:25 PM
Get involved with the AOLP - where else can you get to know and talk to the likes of: Nate Mullen, Tom Williams, Nels Petersen, Paul Gosslin, Mike Gambino, and alot of other great professionals. I have had the pleasure to get a lot of GREAT info and mentoring from Tom Williams. If you are serious about outdoor lighting and want to learn more about the industry. I think the AOLP is a great place to start.
~Ned

I know you didn't mean to do it, but I'm having a big problem with the group of names that you associated here. It's like that Sesame Street tune: "some of these names just don't belong here, some of these names just aren't the same." It did give me a great laugh though, so thanks.

Chris J
04-13-2008, 10:48 PM
I definitely think that the AOLP is a great place to meet and talk to the best in the industry. I also think that the new design certification will really separate the pros from the rest of the field.

I have to disagree with this statement Paul because it is just a bit too strong. From what I experienced at conference, this design certification process is a farce. The concept is good, but the initial take off was very bad. That's why I walked away from it mid course and persued other classes. Again, the concept is good. But until I can say I've been certified by a "certifiable" source, then there is no point in making the long term commitment. I intend to continue to be one of the best in the business, and to say that I'm not a pro because I don't want to participate in this silly certification is simply a random and reckless statement. I do realize that you did not intend it to be that kind of statement, however. :)
$0.10

klkanders
04-14-2008, 01:04 AM
How would it be if I just called myself a landscape lighting representative who doesnt design lighting portraits yet but just places them to achieve the best result?

Keith
Landscape Lighting Placement Specialist (in-training)

NightScenes
04-14-2008, 07:53 AM
So Chris, who certifies the "certifiable" source? Where did they get their certification? Don't you think they had to develop one? The AOLP is really the only organization that can develop these certifications for our industry because it is THE ASSOCIATION OF OUTDOOR LIGHTING PROFESSIONALS. There are no other associations out there like this. This is a unique field and these certifications have to be developed by someone. Who would you suggest create this certification? I do understand what you are saying but you are a CLVLT (created by the association) which means that you accept that the association could develop a low voltage certification.

I think that the design certification will be great. It is a four year program that is still being developed but everything has to begin somewhere.

Lite4
04-14-2008, 09:56 AM
Most all certifiable agencies are made up of a group of seasoned professionals and peers within the community of the associated industry. The AOLP may not encompass all seasoned professionals out there installing lighting, but as Paul said, someone has to step up to the plate and start making advances and looking out for the overall integrity of the industry.

NiteTymeIlluminations
04-14-2008, 10:41 AM
Night Scenes, I never made the suggestion YOU leave your family and go oversees. Someone, not YOU, asked what they need to do to become a lighting designer. Joining AOLP isn't going to make you a lighting designer. Now, if he asked where can he go to listen to egos trying to outdo each other your answer would have been correct....just kidding...sorta...

but no, AOLP doesnt have the program to make you a lighting designer which is on the road to become a senior lighting designer. There is a process and I'd say the first process would be a college program and or start with an internship, etc...good thing...becoming a senior lighting designer criteia has just been laxed so go for it!!!

NightLightingFX
04-14-2008, 11:33 AM
Chris I understand you may not agree with some of the people I mentioned. But I know you agree that among those people there are a lot of strong egos. When there are strong egos there are strong oppinions. If you filter out the ego stuff there is a lot of very great technical information to pick-up on. If I don't agree with something it gives me something more to think about. But around the big egos, I am not there to debate things or judge someone on their personality. It is a great place to get invaluable information. For someone trying to learn good designing skills, some of the people I mentioned are a fantastic resource. As long as you filter out the ego stuff, the AOLP is a great place to start learning about design. The problem with the AOLP is that there are so many egos flying around that can cause friction. I get a big kick out of some of these egos and personalities. When I am at the conference I try to check in my ego at the door and enjoy the different personalities and information.
~Ned

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
04-14-2008, 01:27 PM
Dont forget the IESNA and the IALD...

IALD provides a well known and respected accredidation known by the letters LC that you can put after your name after meeting their requirements. http://www.iald.org/design/professional.asp

I think once the AOLP programs are fully established they should look to partnering with the IALD and / or IESNA to become properly recognized by the rest of the lighting industry.

(Of course a single industry wide technical installation standard for LV outdoor lighting would sure help to streamline things and get the IESNA and IALD to properly recognize us too! IMHO)

NightScenes
04-14-2008, 01:35 PM
James, we are working on that now (industry wide technical installation standard for LV outdoor lighting). IALD had to create a certification and so did the IESNA. There's no reason that the AOLP should not have created a certification that covers the field of "outdoor lighting" without all of the interior lighting stuff.

NiteTymeIlluminations
04-14-2008, 02:11 PM
its no secret that I ignore a few guys on here so I didnt get all the comments but James is right with his IALD comment. Still you need the experience to even start with IALD. Schooling...or you could just sit here and listen to... shoot...i forget with name...Paul Scalia, is that it??? Sorry if I'm wrong but lets see him try something like this...he wouldnt even know where to start even bidding a job like this...I'm sure he made a comment about him not needing an organization or thats he's better than any lighting designer out there.

it's from the IALD website:

Again, the guys question was how to become a lighting designer...not anything about AOLP...Paul have you even responded without mentioning AOLP...now I am kidding...kidding!!!

Chris J
04-14-2008, 07:18 PM
So if it's that simple, why don't I start the JPLB (Johnson's Professional Lighting Brotherhood). I'll put on a class every few months and critique some people's work. I'll then tell them what I think about their designs, and give them "my opinion" on how it should be done. After charging them a couple hundred bucks each, per class, I'll give them all a certificate and the distinction of "Certified Lighting Designers." Sounds silly? What's the difference in me giving the class and who is putting it on now? In the end, it will all mean the same thing to the customer (nothing) because they don't know any of us. Before I take any organization's certification seriously, there is going to have to be some kind of consistency within it's teachings. At present, the AOLP's design committee is not even in agreement over the foot candles produced by a full moon! Some of them are claiming 1/10th of a ft candle, while others are claiming 1/100th. It's like the blind leading the blind!

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
04-14-2008, 07:45 PM
James, we are working on that now (industry wide technical installation standard for LV outdoor lighting). IALD had to create a certification and so did the IESNA. There's no reason that the AOLP should not have created a certification that covers the field of "outdoor lighting" without all of the interior lighting stuff.

Paul... I look forward to reviewing that standard! I really think this is the direction that the AOLP should and must take in the long run for the benefit and even survival of our industry.

I have no qualms at all with the AOLP getting into the certification business. My suggestion of cooperating with the IALD and the IESNA was simply a suggestion that would assist the AOLP in gaining much needed industry exposure and 'respect' from the lighting industry as a whole.

Have a great day.

extlights
04-14-2008, 09:39 PM
I guess for newer guys comming into the industry a design class wouldn't be too horrible of an idea. I'm a firm believer in learning association through work experience. A design class could teach you the different techniques of lighting, but how does that translate into the real world project experience? I'd even bet that a lot of the pro's on here have different techniques that they've come up with over the years that might not even fall into the "traditional lighting techniques" catagory.

Each property you go to is going to be unique, and you need to use your imagination on the design. There is no "code" that you have to follow in your design procedures. Real world practice will make you a better designer, not a class. If you were to hire a salesman would you hire the recent college grad, or the 10 year seasoned veteran with proven results?

The one thing that gets me is that it seems like everyone is too worried about their own work and who's better at what, or how this design would be better with this certain type of lighting. It's very rare that I ever hear anyone mention the customer. If it weren't for them then none of us would be in business... and to continue to get more customers then we have to make our current customers happy.

For someone new comming into the industry I'd tell them this. Learn the technicals and if they want to take a design class then great....but practice, practice, practice. Practice on you're own home, or a relatives whatever..learn the techniques and apply those techniques at a potential customers home and work with them to give them the look that THEY want. If you can do this, only then can you consider yourself a lighting pro and designer.

Eden Lights
04-14-2008, 09:51 PM
Remember to be a real IALD designer you cant sell any products, while many seem to get around this some how. One of the local guys tried to get me to submit one of my projects last year through the Architect, I said no thanks.

seolatlanta
04-14-2008, 11:43 PM
I swear, I post a normal , valid question and it turns into verbal warfare AGAIN. Some of you guys are so angry , do you let your customers see this side of you- if I saw it I wouldnt buy a damn thing from you.

Its just amazing - some of you talk a big game but I am convinced after seeing some of this behavior , most of you are flat out liars. There is no way that some of you can come on this forum and act llike this and actually conduct business like a human. Think about your real names being posted on here and a homeowner looking at what you post. It is happening believe me.

David , signing out.... for good.

NightScenes
04-15-2008, 12:31 PM
Gee David, lighten up buddy. This is an exchange of ideas about a passionate subject among a wide variety of people. So far I haven't seen anyone get out of hand and some valid thoughts have been brought out. I hope you didn't expect everyone to have the same opinion.

Chris J
04-16-2008, 09:26 PM
The one thing that gets me is that it seems like everyone is too worried about their own work and who's better at what, or how this design would be better with this certain type of lighting. It's very rare that I ever hear anyone mention the customer. If it weren't for them then none of us would be in business... and to continue to get more customers then we have to make our current customers happy.


When you are new to the business, I guess you have to listen to the customers direction. When you become advanced in the trade, you learn to give the customer what they want, not what they ask for.

Our customers are not lighting experts, nor do they (rarely) have any experience with quality outdoor lighting. So what is it that they are going to suggest? I know this may sound arrogant, but I stopped listening to the customer's requests a long time ago. I mean I listen, but then I take control of the situation after that. In the 8 years I've been doing this, and over 20,000 fixtures installed, I have never (no, not ever) had a customer that was not satisfied with the results that we provided them. Those statistics come from experience and knowledge alone.

You keep listening to the customer, and you will continue to give them exactly what they thought they wanted. (Until I come along and illuminate the next door neighbors house and make you look like a jack a$$). :waving:

Chris J
04-16-2008, 09:28 PM
What'sa matter David? Got your panties all in a wad? Get over it and get back with the program! :rolleyes:

seolatlanta
04-16-2008, 10:32 PM
I'm over it- temporarily melted down - it happens to the best of us!:)

extlights
04-16-2008, 11:10 PM
I guess maybe I've always followed the same business principles/ideas that I learned in college. I will always give my customers what they want....and usually do it with an extra "flair". Someone might want red, but there are a lot of shades of red....with enough creative thinking you can give the customer what want and what they ask for. :)

NiteTymeIlluminations
04-17-2008, 11:32 AM
So SEO do you want to be a lighting designer or not then?

seolatlanta
04-17-2008, 03:35 PM
Doug

I already am , and have been for years. Small - time but I have worked on some cool projects and with all different types of people.

I was asking a question to provoke some different thought and maybe generate some cool ideas , thats all!

I still am thrilled when I am asked to help guys out to do a design for a property they are doing, although I am selling them the lights now!

Once again, sorry for the blow up , s#$@ happens sometimes.

The Lighting Geek
04-17-2008, 09:03 PM
I want to throw my 2 cents in. I believe we as an industry need to give back to the industry from time to time. I know a lot of you do just that. I have no problems in helping my local Unique or John Deere rep in training contractors and helping the landscape industry grow. I know for a fact some of my competitors are here and have been at the seminars I help out with and I am ok with it. I believe in what we all do as lighting contractors and I believe most of us want to learn our craft and improve our skills. I was very frustrated in my early years of lighting (80's) in that nobody helped anybody with lighting. Now we have an opportunity to help the people coming in and to accelerate the learning process and improve the industry as a whole. I believe a certification process is in order and I believe AOLP is best suited to handle it.

I helped out with the CLT (Certified Landscape Technician) program in CA and witnessed it's growth. We had a maintenance, construction, and irrigation certifications. We thought we would be certifying forman level, and owners and supervisors could not pass the test. It has about an 80% failure rate last I heard because it has teeth. You either know it or you don't, period. I watched people coming back to retest and saw how much they grew and the impact was real. Now that certification is national. I believe certification should be tough and you should be challenged in order to pass it. I look forward to becoming certified 'this year (hopefully the first time..LOL)

I believe that being certified is separate from being a designer. I see the current certification as the mechanics of lighting, the nuts and bolts. I believe we should have a different certification for Designing and it should be demanding and the bar should high or it will mean nothing.

Tommy Herren, CLT

David Gretzmier
04-19-2008, 12:09 AM
If you call yourself a lighting designer, I still believe the public expects some fundamental things that come with that title. Any designer of any trade should be able to design-to scale. that takes a skill that is taught. I have no doubt there are folks that can design in thier head. That does not make you a designer. Fieldwork can help teach designers between bad design and good, but guys, try to remember this, in every field there is a difference of opinion of what is good or bad. for example, I'm typically an uplighter, not a big moonlighting fan. but some folks love downlighting over up. I can look at just about any design and say I'd do a thing or two different. Nearly everyone can.

And the idea that we know better than what the customer says or wants is scary. Many of my clients are concerned with security, and that is it. If a customer wants no shadows, and they ask for it, I try to deliver what they want. It may have more drama, better design and accent the plants better to do it another way, maybe "MY" way, but if a bad guy can hide in all that drama and cool moonlighting shadows, and break in a window, you have failed as a designer.

many people can excell at thier field without formal education and training. many that are formally trained are bad. I truly believe the person that first has formal training in design, and then builds a reputation as an excellent designer and installer will be the most successful in this business.

NiteTymeIlluminations
04-20-2008, 07:08 PM
Doug

I already am , and have been for years. Small - time but I have worked on some cool projects and with all different types of people.

I was asking a question to provoke some different thought and maybe generate some cool ideas , thats all!

I still am thrilled when I am asked to help guys out to do a design for a property they are doing, although I am selling them the lights now!

Once again, sorry for the blow up , s#$@ happens sometimes.

so, how did you become a lighting designer?