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Rcgm
04-11-2008, 08:07 PM
WHat kind of weed fabric do you guys use and what ounce? What do you usually pay for it? I need alot of weed fabric next week for a large landscaping rock job and wanted to see what ounce and price everyone else is paying.


Thanks
RCGM
Brad

SwihartServices
04-11-2008, 09:13 PM
dont use any just preeen it. weeds grow in mulch and the top soil that it turns into.

gene gls
04-11-2008, 10:15 PM
dont use any just preeen it. weeds grow in mulch and the top soil that it turns into.

Its a rock job....My supplyer only carries one type so I don't get a choice.

Isobel
04-11-2008, 10:35 PM
i don't use any, it sterilizes the soil underneath and weeds will grow in the mulch just fine too.

cgaengineer
04-11-2008, 11:10 PM
Dont use it...I laugh when I see people laying it down or buying it at Home Depot. If grass roots can grow in compacted GA soils, it will be no problem to come through a hole in fabric that is much larger than that of the soil pores.

If you use anything you can try using newspaper as it will block weeds from growing through...but you will get weeds in mulch anyway so why bother. Do like others said and Preen it.

LindblomRJ
04-11-2008, 11:31 PM
Only time I mess with any sort of barrier is when I am putting down any sort of rock.

Mark Bogart
04-11-2008, 11:48 PM
I do a lot of xeriscaping and the fabric I use is the 3.5oz Spunbound #350 Polyspun Barrier. It costs around 60 cents a square yard. It comes in 3' through 12' x 300' rolls.
Never heard of it sterilizing the soil. A lot of the organic farmers around here use it to hold in soil moisture.

LindblomRJ
04-12-2008, 12:26 AM
I do a lot of xeriscaping and the fabric I use is the 3.5oz Spunbound #350 Polyspun Barrier. It costs around 60 cents a square yard. It comes in 3' through 12' x 300' rolls.
Never heard of it sterilizing the soil. A lot of the organic farmers around here use it to hold in soil moisture.

http://www.xeriscape.org/mulcharticle.html
They harp on black plastic is a xeriscape setting. If I am using an organic mulch I would rather not use a barrier. As the organic mulch breaks down the nutients are in top of the soil and doesn't do much to help the soil.

Jason Rose
04-12-2008, 01:09 AM
since no one will actually post anything... I will. DeWitt. Best landscape fabric around. It's porous, yet does a good job of keeping weeds from growing through it. Keeps the rock from sinking into the dirt... Come on guys, putting down rock on bare ground? Around here everyone uses landscape fabric under anything. dosn't matter if it's mulch or rock. Putting mulch on bare ground won't fly, it will be 100% taken by weeds in less than a year. Preemergents may be ok at first, but no one wants to have it applied every year.

Big Bad Bob
04-12-2008, 01:36 AM
since no one will actually post anything... I will. DeWitt. Best landscape fabric around. It's porous, yet does a good job of keeping weeds from growing through it. Keeps the rock from sinking into the dirt... Come on guys, putting down rock on bare ground? Around here everyone uses landscape fabric under anything. dosn't matter if it's mulch or rock. Putting mulch on bare ground won't fly, it will be 100% taken by weeds in less than a year. Preemergents may be ok at first, but no one wants to have it applied every year.

Under rock, the only way to go. Under mulch, a waste of time, money and a mess later on.

Smallaxe
04-12-2008, 06:21 AM
The worst part of the fabric occurs, when the roots of the landscape grow into it and the weeds begin to establish and spread. Or the shrubs themselves spread under the fabric and become weeds where they don't belong.

No such thing as a maintenance free landscape. I have seen alot of 'maintenance-free' landscapes over the years and I really haven't seen a single one. When maintenance becomes necessary that fabric is a major hassle.

Fabric under stone is going to make it easier to maintain. Stone gets dirty and grows stuff too.

treegal1
04-12-2008, 12:42 PM
Plastic mulches are ugly, use petrochemical resources and stop an overlay of organic mulch from reaching - and improving - the soil. Plastic mulches encourage shallow root growth, making trees and shrubs more susceptible to drought and wind damage. If the material doesn't "breathe," it can also promote root disease or a lack of oxygen at ground level. It biodegrades and is a disposal problem for both landfill and incinerator (neither is desired). However, Hortopaper and Planters Paper are made from renewable resources and degrade naturally into benign soil- building components.

Organic mulches are attractive, help build up the soil, are made from recycled yard and kitchen waste and do not pose disposal problems. Their only drawback is they can harbor slugs. However, organic mulches have advantages which off-set this drawback. For example, a Tennessee researcher found a dramatic increase in spiders and between 60 - 70 percent less plant damage when she compared mulched first-year gardens to unmulched ones. Another scientist, at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, observed that a good layer of wheat straw or grass hay around potato plants reduced damage from Colorado potato beetles.

Rcgm
04-12-2008, 09:11 PM
Thanks Jason Rose. Hello guys read my post again. I was wondering what type you all use. I wasn't asking for advice on how to keep weeds out. It says I am doing a rock job. Also Preen sucks. Try Snapshot from Lesco it is alot better. Thanks to all that posted about what kind and what ounce.


RCGM
Brad

Mark Bogart
04-12-2008, 11:54 PM
http://www.xeriscape.org/mulcharticle.html
They harp on black plastic is a xeriscape setting. If I am using an organic mulch I would rather not use a barrier. As the organic mulch breaks down the nutients are in top of the soil and doesn't do much to help the soil.

I'm not using black plastic. The only time I use landscape fabric is when decorative rock is used in the design. This keeps the rock from migrating into the soil. Some parts of this country it's a must to use fabric - not plastic - to separate rock from soil. This fabric allows water and nutrients to pass through it and it also allows the soil to breath. As far as mulch, I'm a big supporter of it. The type of mulch I use is a pine/aspen mix. Customer like the look of it and also the smell it gives off.

LindblomRJ
04-12-2008, 11:59 PM
I'm not using black plastic. The only time I use landscape fabric is when decorative rock is used in the design. This keeps the rock from migrating into the soil. Some parts of this country it's a must to use fabric - not plastic - to separate rock from soil. This fabric allows water and nutrients to pass through it and it also allows the soil to breath. As far as mulch, I'm a big supporter of it. The type of mulch I use is a pine/aspen mix. Customer like the look of it and also the smell it gives off.

Gotcha. Thanks.

mdvaden
04-13-2008, 05:17 PM
dont use any just preeen it. weeds grow in mulch and the top soil that it turns into.

That's the way I look at it too.

Seeds blow in, germinate on top.

And the fabric is a headache for future planting, weeding and irrigation work.

I use fabric mainly to separate soil beneath from decorative crushed gravel on top.

ed2hess
04-13-2008, 07:29 PM
Only time I mess with any sort of barrier is when I am putting down any sort of rock.

Ever tried to repair irrigation or lighting after somebody has put down this fabric:hammerhead:

LindblomRJ
04-13-2008, 08:50 PM
Ever tried to repair irrigation or lighting after somebody has put down this fabric:hammerhead:
Yes. Any sort of work after the fact.

MDVaden hit it again.

Jason Rose
04-13-2008, 11:21 PM
Just kinda funny to see how different areas of the country do things... I know I've already posted here, but I'm amazed at how many people don't use fabric/weed barrier under mulch. Around here it's standard protocal. Also edging, everyone that has landscaping of any kind has some sort of edging between the bed and the grass, be it metal, plastic, stone, concrete, whatever. I see all you guys posting about cutting edges every year around beds and re-mulching... Never heard of that sort of thing around here. No one here adds mulch every season either. It gets put in once, and usually that's it. Also we don't have any source for "bulk" mulch here, it's all bagged.

Not trying to point out "right or wrong" just that it's so much different here than in a lot of the rest of the country...

Oh, and "pine straw" That cracks me up. We call that pine needles here, and it's DEBRIS that you remove from the lawn and the landscape and haul to the dump... Can't imigine buying it in bales and dumping it on a landscape.

jasonlandscape
04-14-2008, 12:43 AM
wow! If i had to buy bagged mulch for some of the mulch jobs ive had, i'd kill myself...i've done 20 yrd mulch jobs...that'd be like 300 bags, lol...i used a dingo to move it all around, i would never carry a bag of mulch.

and plastic edging sux balls, looks ugly, and is just stupid.

if u know how to landscape then u don't need all these maintnece free gimmick POS products from home depot.

Big Bad Bob
04-14-2008, 06:14 AM
Just kinda funny to see how different areas of the country do things... I know I've already posted here, but I'm amazed at how many people don't use fabric/weed barrier under mulch. Around here it's standard protocal. Also edging, everyone that has landscaping of any kind has some sort of edging between the bed and the grass, be it metal, plastic, stone, concrete, whatever. I see all you guys posting about cutting edges every year around beds and re-mulching... Never heard of that sort of thing around here. No one here adds mulch every season either. It gets put in once, and usually that's it. Also we don't have any source for "bulk" mulch here, it's all bagged.

Not trying to point out "right or wrong" just that it's so much different here than in a lot of the rest of the country...

Oh, and "pine straw" That cracks me up. We call that pine needles here, and it's DEBRIS that you remove from the lawn and the landscape and haul to the dump... Can't imigine buying it in bales and dumping it on a landscape.

What do you do when the mulch breaks down? For it to continue to look good, here, with the snow and other elements that I'm sure you have to deal with too, it needs to be refreshed at least bi-annually.

Jason Rose
04-14-2008, 09:14 AM
Well I say "usually". There are exceptions, people/commercial properties that DO once in every few years get some new mulch added on top, but it's just a rare occurance. I know some people decide mulch is a joke that first time that they have to add more, then the next year it's gone again. That's when they bring in the river rock, lol. I couldn't even begin to count the number of places that I mow that have thin or just totally bare mulch beds.

I actually had mulch in my landscape in the front of my house. I got tired of it washing out with the water coming off he roof, degrading into dirt, growing weeds, and needing more added every year to actually look "good". I have removed all of it (man that was fun) and am putting in river rock as soon as I have some free time on a saturday.

Mark Bogart
04-14-2008, 11:13 AM
What do you do when the mulch breaks down? For it to continue to look good, here, with the snow and other elements that I'm sure you have to deal with too, it needs to be refreshed at least bi-annually.

Mulch here has to be replenished every four to five years. We don't have the humidity that helps break down organic material. We also have soils here with very little microbial activity.