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View Full Version : Problem With St. Augustine.-- Help


lawnbridge
04-17-2008, 10:14 PM
What Is Wrong With My Customers St. Augustine? I Am New To St. Augustine And Have Been Told It Is A Fungus. Help Please.

lawnbridge
04-17-2008, 10:18 PM
Here Are Two More Pics.

Carolina Cuts
04-17-2008, 10:19 PM
looks exactly like my mothers lawn.... happened at the end of last season. Personally, I believe it was TOO much water, (if thats at all possible)... (she was out of town and her irrigation control box got screwed up and the water remaining running over and over and over... like 4-5 cycles a day for a week..) Weeds shot up like crazy soon after. I'm in the middle of rehabing the lawn now...

Somebody else told me chinchbugs.... they love St. Aug. grass...
I'm stumped myself...

quiet
04-17-2008, 10:23 PM
The lawns have been slow coming out this year. But this look like several problems going on at once; poor watering, low fertility, disease . . .

Don't guess. Take a sample to your county extension service.

lawnbridge
04-17-2008, 10:49 PM
I was thinking of taking a sample to the county extension. I was thinking overwatering and lack of good fertilizer. I laid this sod last year and it was beautiful. I do not take care of yard, mowing or treatments. He has some ol guy that has done the mowing and I assume fertilizing forever. Yet, he now is calling asking me what's wrong with his grass.

ted putnam
04-17-2008, 11:39 PM
Lot's of pecans. Is it under a tree? Could be left over brown patch damage from last Fall or earlier this spring. Looked like a lesion or 2 on some leaf blade in first close up pic. CYA( Take a fresh sample and have it checked)

bug-guy
04-18-2008, 06:49 AM
was there any frost there are the stolons(runners) green

vegomatic40
04-18-2008, 07:50 AM
Could be a lot of things but likely to be old Brown Patch damage (Rhizoctonia Solani) or even Take-all-patch. Typically active B.Patch disease attacks at the middle of the leaf blade and it tends to simply fall over at the site of the lesions. Bring a sample to your county extension agent for diagnosis. If it is T.A.P, you may have problems controlling it as not many fungicides are effective. Eagle and Immunox appear to be fairly effective but like many fungicides require repeated app.s for complete control. From the pics is does look like poor fertility levels. Fertilize the turf with a slow release fert. of your choice and watch for recovery. St. Augustine is pretty tuff stuff so chances are it will recover with a proper fert./disease/insect control program. Hope this helps but I am more than a few years (and zones) away from dealing with St. Aug'y.

Ric
04-18-2008, 10:18 AM
Could be a lot of things but likely to be old Brown Patch damage (Rhizoctonia Solani) or even Take-all-patch. Typically active B.Patch disease attacks at the middle of the leaf blade and it tends to simply fall over at the site of the lesions. Bring a sample to your county extension agent for diagnosis. If it is T.A.P, you may have problems controlling it as not many fungicides are effective. Eagle and Immunox appear to be fairly effective but like many fungicides require repeated app.s for complete control. From the pics is does look like poor fertility levels. Fertilize the turf with a slow release fert. of your choice and watch for recovery. St. Augustine is pretty tuff stuff so chances are it will recover with a proper fert./disease/insect control program. Hope this helps but I am more than a few years (and zones) away from dealing with St. Aug'y.


Yo

Texas has reported a lot of Take All Root Rot (Gaeumannomyces, graminis, graminis. Ggg) this past season. Ggg is a disease of stressed St Augustine. Lack of Fertilizer along with bad cultural practises will certainly bring on Ggg. Look very early in the Morning for white webbing on top of the ground. look for short black roots and crowns that have black spots.

I am not good with pictures, I like to be there and see, feel, and smell what I am trying to diagnose. But IMHO the turf looks hungry

vegomatic40
04-18-2008, 11:11 AM
Holy Moses! Ric and I agree on something?! Perhaps the apocalypse is upon at last. Look out for the 4 horseman comin over the hill or even (shudder) the Cubs winning the World Series this year. Just kidding Ric.

Ric
04-18-2008, 11:30 AM
Holy Moses! Ric and I agree on something?! Perhaps the apocalypse is upon at last. Look out for the 4 horseman comin over the hill or even (shudder) the Cubs winning the World Series this year. Just kidding Ric.

Vegomatic

See, you are finally raising above the the unwashed masses and up taking the fine knowledge I have offered you. :drinkup:

gregory
04-18-2008, 01:16 PM
i was thinking the same thing that it looked hungry but didn't want to open my mouth............

don't know about the cub comment don't think thats going to happen.......

panchovi11a
04-18-2008, 10:59 PM
Lawn Bridge, down here in South texas pretty much all we grow. Last year had a lawn like this and it was chinch bugs. Applied Ortho Max attached to garden hose and that did it.

lawnguy26
04-29-2008, 09:25 PM
Is it in shade through the summer time? Looks like a combination of shade decline, poor soil pH and improper or lack of feeding.

ICT Bill
04-29-2008, 10:28 PM
Hit it with chitosan, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, you will be amazed at the results. EPA registered as a bio-pesticide. It hydrolyzes fungi, basically turns it to water. make sure you cover 80% of the leaf

Yes this is the same stuff I take and give to my dog every day.

With a 1-2-3 NPP mix 1/2 ounce per gallon treat at 2 gallons per 1000

Yes it is our product, make your own if you like. Just its a little pricey from the pharmacy, our price $0.68 per 1000, yep 68 cents

bostonkelly
09-19-2008, 03:56 PM
If it is in fact Take All, fertilizing is the last thing I would do. I have had a heck of time with Take the past two years and discovered Urea actually contributes to the problem. If anything I might use a light coat of Ammonium Sulphate. The Sulphur lowers the pH and helps a little at first. A & M suggests peat moss, banner maxx/heritage, raise the mowing height, aereate. To tell you the truth I have been less than effective in getting it under control...but when I tried to fertilize it out of it, the problem just got worse.

Has anyone had better results? I would love to hear about it!

ICT Bill
09-19-2008, 05:31 PM
If it is in fact Take All, fertilizing is the last thing I would do. I have had a heck of time with Take the past two years and discovered Urea actually contributes to the problem. If anything I might use a light coat of Ammonium Sulphate. The Sulphur lowers the pH and helps a little at first. A & M suggests peat moss, banner maxx/heritage, raise the mowing height, aereate. To tell you the truth I have been less than effective in getting it under control...but when I tried to fertilize it out of it, the problem just got worse.

Has anyone had better results? I would love to hear about it!

Old post but you are right, Take all patch is a fungal disease and can be moved from lawn to lawn easily by mowers. A nice lawn on Monday can be dirt on Friday the stuff spreads so quickly, we have good to great results with our NPP product, it is extremely safe. It stops it in its tracks and usually there is new growth in 3 or 4 days