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View Full Version : Idea for poa annua....


dancar81
04-19-2008, 12:14 PM
OK, so I have now figured out I have poa annua problem in the otherwise good lawn. Section of approx 75% poa annua is approx 200 sq ft. Here is what I was thinking for renovation/control. In this order. Late Sept....Outline the area...apply Roundup to everything.....allow to die....apply Dimension.....put a layer of topsoil approx 1/2 inch to the area...roll seed into the layer of top.

Does this make any sense...? Any suggestions/comments appreciated.

dancar81
04-19-2008, 12:33 PM
Was also considering just apply dimesntion then topsoil and roll in seed to the topsoil.

PSUturf
04-19-2008, 05:13 PM
Most of the Poa annua seed that germinate will be at the surface. I don't think the Dimension will help much. If you get a heavy rain before germination it could stir up the soil enough to expose the turf seed to the pre-emerge and kill the seedlings.

I would just remove 1/2 - 1" soil, add new soil, and re-seed.

naughty62
04-20-2008, 09:45 AM
kill the area out with gly , wait a week to see if you killed it all ,reseed ,after a couple mows and the dogdays of summers are over apply pre that labeled for a. poa or consider sideron .If you do get alittle coming up late suummer/early fall, have home owner pull it by hand .

PSUturf
04-20-2008, 08:49 PM
There is not a pre-emergent for cool season turf that will allow rye, fescue, or KBG to germinate yet suppresses Annual Bluegrass. Annual bluegrass is a cool season grass. Pre-emergent, and some post emergent, herbicides can differentiate between cool and warm season grasses but not between cool season species. Velocity herbicide is an exception. It has very good suppression of Annual bluegrass in Bentgrass turf. Velocity doesn't kill it but controls it's growth to the point where you can't really see the Poa annua while the chemical is active. When the Velocity wears off the Poa slowly starts to come back. The only way to eradicate it is to sterilize the soil.(and it will eventually come back)

Use good cultural practices to keep it in check: deep watering, avoid excessive fertility, slow release N, reduce compaction, overseed with fescue in shaded areas.