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Mike M
04-21-2008, 08:27 PM
What are the draw backs to being a licensed electrician? Is there a costly annual fee?

I don't mind studying and taking the test, but I want to know what the downsides are. Are classes mandatory?

NightScenes
04-21-2008, 09:02 PM
OK Mike, you have a lot to do if you want an electricians license. First you need to get an apprentice license and work as an apprentice, under a master for 2 years. Then you can take the journeyman's exam. Once you pass this test (good luck) you can work under a master for another 4 years. Then you can take your master's exam (good luck). There really is no down side to being an electrician but it's not something that you can just do on a whim.

There is also an annual license fee and insurance that must be carried as well.

Landscape Illuminating
04-21-2008, 09:09 PM
OK Mike, you have a lot to do if you want an electricians license. First you need to get an apprentice license and work as an apprentice, under a master for 2 years. Then you can take the journeyman's exam. Once you pass this test (good luck) you can work under a master for another 4 years. Then you can take your master's exam (good luck). There really is no down side to being an electrician but it's not something that you can just do on a whim.

There is also an annual license fee and insurance that must be carried as well.

You don't need schooling down there? We need hundreds of hours in school before we can even take the test along with the experience you speak of.

NightScenes
04-21-2008, 09:28 PM
You don't have to have "class" time here but you do have to have the OJT and of course, pass the test, which you're not going to do without knowing what you are doing.

Pro-Scapes
04-21-2008, 11:12 PM
Same here. I was working twoard my electricians lics under a friend but we met another electrician at church and he does honest and good work. I really have no reason to need my license now.

Paul didnt you say at one time you still sub out your electricians work even tho you are one ?

NightScenes
04-21-2008, 11:45 PM
Yep, I don't have the time to do the work myself or supervise (on the job). I sub out all line voltage work, it makes things so much easier.

Mike M
04-21-2008, 11:57 PM
Apprentice/classes/years. Thems would be downsides.

David Gretzmier
04-23-2008, 07:27 PM
here you need class time, apprentice time, journeyman time and then testing testing testing.

Tesla Contracting Inc.
04-24-2008, 09:48 PM
My first post on this board, YEAH!
Master electrician = 3-7 years of W-2"s working under an licensed electrician, with the license in the county / jurisdiction you wish to apply for.
Written exam and quiet possibly a practical to encompass all electrical fields:
Residential
Commercial
Industrial

Liability Insurance for an operating electrician in the county / jurisdiction applied for.
Workman's Comp Certs.
Certificate of Business, i.e.: SUB-S, DBA, Full Corp., etc. depending on state of issue.

Me:
5 1/2 apprentice
5 1/2 journeyman
Get the goods and spend the money, lots of dough (3 MIL Liability due to commercial work).

Mike M
04-24-2008, 09:56 PM
Wow.

All that regulation. I know it's necessary with the complexity and dangers of the field, but holy crap. That's like becoming a commercial pilot.

Tesla Contracting Inc.
04-24-2008, 10:06 PM
Yeah the req's are tough,
Not as tough as lighting around swimming pools, PITFA

I've personally seen top notch residential contractors fail due to the industrial sections of the exam. i.e.:
Motor control wiring
Service requirements of over 1600 amperes
High voltage requirements
etc.