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View Full Version : Under ground drainage from rain gutters?


meets1
05-01-2008, 10:12 PM
In the past I have done this with either PVC pipe or the black tile pipe that has the sock around it. I would prefer PVC. I am draining two downspouts into one outlet and flowing the water about 40ft from the building to a catch basin where it will empty into there ditch area by the driveway. This is a commercial building were working with here. Do any of you guys do this differently or suggest another route to get the water out of the building area?

This is a bank - 2 story but they added a drive thru and there are 2 down spouts draining in this area. Were going to landspace/seed/irrigate this but they want the water out of there besides draining onto the landscape.

Bigred350
05-01-2008, 10:17 PM
Thats how we usually do it. On houses we use 4" corrigated pipe with a catch basin at the end. Usually just past the beds a few feet.

jaybird24
05-01-2008, 10:22 PM
Maybe you could sell them on the idea of being water conscious and upsell a rain garden to them, instead of running it to a ditch. Around here it is required in many areas for each commercial building, and some residential, to handle it's own water, rather than contribute to what the concrete jungle already does.

shovelracer
05-01-2008, 10:23 PM
Depending on the square footage of the roof and the size of the downspout you may want to rethink the 2-1 idea. Otherwise it sounds OK.

CAG
05-01-2008, 11:27 PM
one thing i would add is..u said you put a sock around the pipe i would then assume that u used perforated pipe.. no need for the fabric or the perforated pipe just run solid and you will be fine..

ozarkearthworks
05-02-2008, 01:34 AM
Maybe you could sell them on the idea of being water conscious and upsell a rain garden to them, instead of running it to a ditch. Around here it is required in many areas for each commercial building, and some residential, to handle it's own water, rather than contribute to what the concrete jungle already does.

Definitely the most "proper" way of dealing with runoff. Function and form in one package.

AGLA
05-02-2008, 07:05 AM
Be careful in doing this on commercial sites because these sometimes fall under plumbing code within 10' of the building and required to be cast iron as well as to be installed by a plumber. I'm not sure what the reasoning is, but I'm sure it has to do with public safety (and a strong lobby).

GreeneScape Inc.
05-02-2008, 08:24 AM
I agree with the idea of the rain garden. Companies are very open to the idea of being environmentally friendly in todays market. It is good PR for the company you are doing the work for as well as your company. I would think the possibility of niche service in your area if others don't do this sort of thing.

meets1
05-02-2008, 09:11 AM
describe to me the proper function or set-up of a rain garden.

ozarkearthworks
05-02-2008, 11:50 AM
Rain gardens are a method of bioretention. I am giving you a few links to check out. In short, a rain garden collects storm water from roofs, parking lots, curb cuts, driveways, etc. and directs it into a planted, shallow depression composed of a permeable mixture of gravel, sand, and soil. When collected in the depression, the water is filtered by the planting and infiltrates back into the ground and water tables, reducing pollutants that reach surrounding streams and watersheds. Another bonus is that rain gardens are very low maintenance.

AGLA is correct about the + 10ft. from foundation. You don't want runoff settling close to the foundation.

Yes, they do promote environmental stewardship and a sense of community pride. We have rain gardens in each of our city parks and at several of our elementary schools which have been installed with help from the community. I install rain gardens and have gained great interest in the concept from several commercial entities, including Walmart Home Office... We proposed one to the corporate office Tuesday of this week. They are considering installing them at curb cuts in their massive parking lot.

Here are a few links. Hope you check them out over the weekend.

http://www.consciouschoice.com/2001/cc1405/raingardens1405.html

http://www.montgomerycountymd.gov/Content/DEP/Rainscapes/garden.htm

http://clean-water.uwex.edu/pubs/pdf/home.rgmanual.pdf

ozarkearthworks
05-02-2008, 12:19 PM
I also want to throw out the idea of piping your runoff into a bioswale. Depending on how much runoff is coming off of the roof, bioswales are able to handle more water than a typical rain garden and have the same eco-friendly ideology.
Hope this can help.

1wezil
05-02-2008, 10:58 PM
bump bump ---------------