PDA

View Full Version : Dylox


cgaengineer
05-09-2008, 03:50 PM
Well before anyone starts to hammer me because I am an unlicensed applicator let me just set myself clear, this is for my own lawn not my customers. However I am currently studying for the Cat 24 and general standards for Georgia just the same.

About 2 months ago I noticed a mole tunnel and I quickly eradicated him but ignored the main reason why my lawn was a target....GRUBS. I now have a large hollow sounding dead spot then when I look under the turf I notice lots of white grubs. According to my study material the best time to apply a control for white grubs is during July, but right now they are causing damage and I want them stopped. I checked Home Depot and they had grub control but I declined and headed to Lesco. Lesco sold me granular DyLox which is a post control and I was told that this should work very well and kills the grubs on contact. As anyone studying for the pesticide exam knows, the materials really don't have much on how specific chemicals work and how they are to be applied so I pulled up the label and MSDS on Dylox and was noticing that the water in a spray solution has to have a certain pH in order to have a longer half life.

My question is, if I apply at the recommended rate and water, is the pH of the city water applied a factor in the half life of the product even if using a granular? Would the pH of the soil also have an effect on the half life as well?

Ric
05-09-2008, 03:57 PM
Well before anyone starts to hammer me because I am an unlicensed applicator let me just set myself clear, this is for my own lawn not my customers. However I am currently studying for the Cat 24 and general standards for Georgia just the same.

About 2 months ago I noticed a mole tunnel and I quickly eradicated him but ignored the main reason why my lawn was a target....GRUBS. I now have a large hollow sounding dead spot then when I look under the turf I notice lots of white grubs. According to my study material the best time to apply a control for white grubs is during July, but right now they are causing damage and I want them stopped. I checked Home Depot and they had grub control but I declined and headed to Lesco. Lesco sold me granular DyLox which is a post control and I was told that this should work very well and kills the grubs on contact. As anyone studying for the pesticide exam knows, the materials really don't have much on how specific chemicals work and how they are to be applied so I pulled up the label and MSDS on Dylox and was noticing that the water in a spray solution has to have a certain pH in order to have a longer half life.

My question is, if I apply at the recommended rate and water, is the pH of the city water applied a factor in the half life of the product even if using a granular? Would the pH of the soil also have an effect on the half life as well?


cga

High pH soil will kill Dylox very quickly. It is one of the main problems I have to face in my area. My water is a 6 pH which does help. If you have high pH soil apply acid forming fertilizer and even straight sulfur to help lower pH.

cgaengineer
05-09-2008, 10:30 PM
Thank you for the quick reply Ric even though we both may have not started out on the best of terms, I appreciate your reply and your advice was taken.

I applied a couple bags of Solu-Cal (Our soil always needs lime) along with the dylox, 2 bags at the 10k rate so I am hoping for some dead grubs and green grass in a few weeks. I treated my entire lawn even though the damage seemed to be in the new sod I installed last year...wish me luck!

cgaengineer
05-10-2008, 03:23 PM
I am now adding some water as I got a permit to water for herbicide. I am now seeing grubs starting to surface. So it appears to be working.

ETM
05-10-2008, 05:16 PM
Andersons insecticide works great also and we pay $26 for a 50lbs bag.Good luck

Subterfuge
05-10-2008, 06:20 PM
I pulled up the label and MSDS on Dylox and was noticing that the water in a spray solution has to have a certain pH in order to have a longer half life.

This is a great start.(reading the label!!!) Dylox is in fact a contact cholinestrase inhibitor. There is no need or use to worry about "half-life" unless you are going to tank mix and hold product in that state. Why would anyone tank mix an insecticide and hold it in solution is the question? Dylox is also available as a granular in the form of Dylox 6.2 and it works very well if you water it in. You have to water in Dylox anyway. Consider mixing in some imidacloprid as well. Lesco/JDL sells it in many forms including Merit, Bandit and Allectus. Basically, imidacloprid keeps the eggs of the mature instars form hatching. This is important as Dylox will do nothing for control of the eggs that are invariably present.

cgaengineer
05-11-2008, 12:35 AM
This is a great start.(reading the label!!!) Dylox is in fact a contact cholinestrase inhibitor. There is no need or use to worry about "half-life" unless you are going to tank mix and hold product in that state. Why would anyone tank mix an insecticide and hold it in solution is the question? Dylox is also available as a granular in the form of Dylox 6.2 and it works very well if you water it in. You have to water in Dylox anyway. Consider mixing in some imidacloprid as well. Lesco/JDL sells it in many forms including Merit, Bandit and Allectus. Basically, imidacloprid keeps the eggs of the mature instars form hatching. This is important as Dylox will do nothing for control of the eggs that are invariably present.

So I really have no problems to worry about with the pH of my soil? They only mentioned if it was in a solution which sounded like if it was tank mixed but I was not 100% sure. I read some other information that mentioned it would not work well in soils with high pH so I became worried. I did use the granular 6.2 so if what you say is correct, with my watering in to control the movement via wind, and then the 90% chance of rain tonight I should be ok right?

I will follow-up with an application of Merit to get season long control and I am also thinking about removing my rose bushes and explaining to the neighbors about the crape myrtles that also attract jap beetles in hopes of convincing them to plant something better (They look like crap anyway). My neighbor mentioned the use of the traps and I told her NO...I told her they attract the damn beetles...this year I will also spray any plants that have these little buggers eating the leaves...if only I could find something that will repel/kill them without harming the many birds that visit my lawn...I tried some organic repellent and it didn't work well, tried dish soap with pepper, no change...must have liked Mexican food.

cgaengineer
05-11-2008, 11:45 AM
After treatment and watering I went out late (12 am) last night to an area with a large population of grubs. I picked out 4 grubs and set them on a paper towel and put in garage...this morning they are all dead and shriveled up. Looks like the Dylox worked! Better living through chemistry!