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View Full Version : Propagation anyone?


allinearth
05-26-2008, 10:52 AM
Anyone on here doing their own propagation? I would like to know about your set up etc. We have tried to do cuttings on some plants with limited success. Looking for tips and time frames for different cuttings.:walking:

Paradise Landscapes
05-29-2008, 08:36 AM
I'm trying Purple Sand Cherry with rooting hormone in a peat-top soil 4" deep pot, another with P.J.M Rhododendron and Olga Mezitt Rhodies. Just started. I'll let you know any successes.

allinearth
05-29-2008, 09:00 AM
Are you using mist or just keepin them wet?

Paradise Landscapes
05-30-2008, 07:55 AM
I like to keep my soil damp. I bought my peat-soil mix, root-tone and tray yesterday. I will be working on them tonight. The purple sand cherries look promising.

BrandonV
05-30-2008, 08:51 PM
we have one prop house w/ a 6 zone mister system. we had to get back into because a lot of our favorite plants we can't find anymore. the big guys are patenting everything, then when the patent runs out they stop all production and move on to the next patent.

Grassmechanic
05-31-2008, 02:22 PM
Anyone on here doing their own propagation? I would like to know about your set up etc. We have tried to do cuttings on some plants with limited success. Looking for tips and time frames for different cuttings.:walking:

Some plants don't take with stem or leaf cuttings. You have to do root cuttings, layering, division, etc. to have success at propagation. It all depends on the plant. The easiest for most woody shrubs is the root cutting method.

Paradise Landscapes
05-31-2008, 05:34 PM
The easiest for most woody shrubs is the root cutting method.

Is that when you use a root and not a stem? :confused:

Mike Fronczak
06-01-2008, 08:08 AM
theres a guy on the intrenet selling a system (mike McGrothy) Check out his website.

allinearth
06-01-2008, 10:57 AM
Anyone have a preferance on kind of mist head?

allinearth
06-01-2008, 11:02 AM
we have one prop house w/ a 6 zone mister system. we had to get back into because a lot of our favorite plants we can't find anymore. the big guys are patenting everything, then when the patent runs out they stop all production and move on to the next patent.

This is why I am trying to grow more of my own stuff. Fuel for going and getting stuff getting too high. Some plants I like or want are not grown by growers. Started this year buying more liners and growing out. Has really cut down on my plant buying trips.

Grassmechanic
06-09-2008, 12:11 PM
Is that when you use a root and not a stem? :confused:


Yes. Depending on the situation, I'll carefully expose a root and cut it and leave the cut end exposed a little until it sends up new growth. Then I'll carefully dig up the new plant or leave it (as in a hedge). Or sometimes, I'll sacrifice the whole plant and make many cuttings. Just depends on the plant and the situation.

k911lowe
06-09-2008, 12:20 PM
seems like it would not be cost effective if you count your time in,unless you did it on a huge scale.

Paradise Landscapes
06-09-2008, 04:17 PM
Rhody + Sand Cherry update:

Looks like they haven't grown yet, Looks like a well-watered plant. I don't want to pull them out of the peat-soil bed just to check for rooting.

Opinion wanted: I was told by someone to boil water, putting my rooting hormone in there to dilute then use substance like solu-fert to encourage roots.

I have alot of rose-of-sharons to pot from soil to do. They have grown wild (plant sent runners) and need to be potted and put on craigslist or something. They are 3' tall.

Pro Lawn Care.PLCInc.
07-03-2008, 12:35 AM
I love plants. I have about 50 Rhododendron cuttings I took a little late. Plant was almost full bloom. I took from the top of the plant, and took cuttings without blooms. They seem to be doing something. I was told about 6 months for good root growth. Warming tables through the first year, and then finally put in the soil. Course medium is best for propagation. Mists are also very good for constant moisture and helps with frost issues and insects. I'm not sure but boiling water "no bacteria", but dilluting would probably only be necessary if you didn't want to keep buying more hormone. Then it might take longer.

jkingrph
07-24-2008, 06:17 PM
I have been doing as a homeowner for a while. I just take cuttings, clean any leaf growth off end that will go into medium, dip in growth hormone, and into potting soil, and most important keep moist.

I did a large number of arborviate cuttings and something got into them last night and I found a couple of the small pots dug out, Had good root growth, and had just put them in this spring. If the remaing ones make it I shall have plants that would have cost me over $600. I am planning on rooting some more this fall for future use. Not nearly as quick as buying established plants but much more economical than paying $15 per plant plus shipping as this is a new, not too common variety. I also have a large number of boxwood cuttings that appear to be doing well.

I do it all outside on my deck, and the temps have been in mid to upper 90's the last six weeks no rain in sight, and will probably get worse

cgaengineer
08-01-2008, 07:42 AM
For those interested...gardenias and lantana are very easy...I have had a 100% success rate on rooting whether its potting soil or sand. The key is to keep cutting moist...if you are using 1 gallon pots use 1 gallon freezer bags over them to help keep the moisture loss from the leaves to a minimum. I have also found that the fewer the leaves the better the chances of rooting...I usually leave the two leaves at the top and I try to make all of my cuts just below a node.

cgaengineer
08-01-2008, 07:43 AM
I have been doing as a homeowner for a while. I just take cuttings, clean any leaf growth off end that will go into medium, dip in growth hormone, and into potting soil, and most important keep moist.

I did a large number of arborviate cuttings and something got into them last night and I found a couple of the small pots dug out, Had good root growth, and had just put them in this spring. If the remaing ones make it I shall have plants that would have cost me over $600. I am planning on rooting some more this fall for future use. Not nearly as quick as buying established plants but much more economical than paying $15 per plant plus shipping as this is a new, not too common variety. I also have a large number of boxwood cuttings that appear to be doing well.

I do it all outside on my deck, and the temps have been in mid to upper 90's the last six weeks no rain in sight, and will probably get worse

Interesting abot the arborviate cuttings...I will have to try this...I wonder if Leyland Cypress would be as easy?

Paradise Landscapes
09-04-2008, 05:19 PM
Fellas, Heres a sad, sad update. I lost 3/4 of the stock I tried to start that are Rhoddies. (Olga Mezitt and Purple Gem) Looked at the bottom of the stems for any root developement. I didn't see any. It looks like that they are just deinking away like no tomorrow. Yes, they still have the rooting hormone on those stems. I also used the new growth just so you'll know. Anyways, I guess I'll be using this as my college science experiment. 1 flat with Rooting hormone and 1 flat without is side the colleges' greenhouse.

Paradise Landscapes
09-05-2008, 12:17 AM
Sorry on the SP. It seems like they were doing nothing but drinking away like no tomorrow. ( I was in college when typing )

White Gardens
11-03-2008, 01:34 PM
That I'd jump into the thread. (even though it's older)

I was thinking about playing around with some woody ornamentals this year and see if I can get any propagation out of them.

My question is if anybody has had any luck with grafting (root stock) and also air layer on a plant stem (bud area) to achieve roots.

Paradise Landscapes
12-18-2008, 06:46 PM
Way over due update > They didn't take. I lost them all. I have further research and study to do to make it work next time.

Layering works best on plants like Forsythia and some Rhodies. Any shrubs with advetitous buds will make roots. Air layering works in the same manner but, It never hurts to try!

CkLandscapingOrlando
12-18-2008, 09:05 PM
The best book for beginers that I've found is the American Horticultural Society "Plant Propagation"It covers in pretty good detail how to prop garden trees,shrubs and climbing plants,perrennials,annuals and biennials,cacti and other succulents,bulbous plants,and vegetables.It really opened my eyes to some things.Like I use to devide ti plants from 4 in a 3gal to 2 in a 3gal. or 1 with a cut back.But if you take the whole stock and cut it down the center then cut each about 3in you can root them all.

Paradise Landscapes
12-21-2008, 09:37 PM
I'll have to check that book out. I've been doing all my propagation research here online.

CkLandscapingOrlando
12-22-2008, 07:03 AM
I'm old school in that regard.I like to make a pot of mud and read as I watch the news.The book gives all the ways to prop a plant as well as dificulty for each type,what month to due what,bottom heat,humidity,and every thing else.I think my problem with the comp is that you have to search to much to find what you want

44DCNF
12-22-2008, 07:29 PM
Paradise, was your medium heated?

Paradise Landscapes
12-22-2008, 11:21 PM
No. My professor wanted me to only do with and without rooting hormone. He claimed that it wasn't neccessary but, I would have liked doing both at the same time which would have been very interesting.