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TexasFire221
05-27-2008, 01:24 AM
I want to add landscape lighting to my services. I dont have the slightest idea where to start. I need a little know how. can someone point me in the right direction. Thanks.

The Lighting Geek
05-27-2008, 02:08 AM
I would recommend purchasing copies of 'Trade Secrets of Professional Landscape Lighting' by Nate Mullen and 'The Landscape Lighting Book' by Janet Lennox Moyer. That along with as many seminars from distributors/manufacturers and you can fit in.

Tomwilllight
05-27-2008, 03:05 PM
I agree with Mr. Herren's advice completely and will only add some notes from a post I left last week under a thread titled "Looking To Learn."

1 - Go to - www.janmoyerdesign.com/ - check her web site
2 - While there, check out the Landscape Lighting Institute. Jan is now able to offer scholarships for students. These grants are made possible by support from a number of the industry's major players.
3 - Buy and read her book - it's not cheap nor is it an easy read. It will be the best money and time you've ever spent.
4 - LSL is very technical, you must master that information & practice.
5 - LSL is can be an ART FORM and if treated as such, requires rigorus training. Get your training from the best. I think most folks in this business will agree that Jan Moyer sets the standard for all of us and it's a very high standard.


Unlike the manufacturers's workshops - which are created to sell you their product as much as to train you good practice - Moyer's Institute will allow you to use lighting equipment from all major (and most minor) manufacutrers. No hype... you decide for yourself about what works best for you.

Tom
WLLD.us

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
05-28-2008, 02:55 AM
There is a plethora of information available to you on this forum. I would encourage you to do a search of the various threads using the 'search' button at the top of the page.

You might also want to contact some of the established professional lighting companies in your area. You will find that many mentorship opportunities exist in the industry.

NightScenes
05-30-2008, 01:53 PM
I would agree with all here especially James and Tommy. When starting out you need a lot of basic information and then tune it up as you go along. Read a lot and practice at your home. This will develope your technique and let you see what each lamp and fixture can do in any situation. This forum is full of great information so sit back with a cold one and start reading.

Tomwilllight
05-30-2008, 02:49 PM
Paul,

I agree with everything you said. At some point we all need someone who "sees light" (not just "looks" at it) to review what we've done and ask us if that's what we intended to do.

A lighted landscape is filled with so much visual information and so completely different from most of our life's experience, a knowledgeable guide is very useful in our learning process.

Let me restate that. I believe we must have that guide to help us grow as Lighting Designers.

The best part of Jan's institute is you will have the opportunity to discuss, in detail, every choice you made when lighting an actual landscape.

The most seductive trap in this business is to allow ourselves to rely too much on our customer's reactions to our work. The addition of light to the darkness is so powerful that the usual initial response is a gigantic and unqualified WOW. That reaction will cause checks to be written... but does it make any of us better, more thoughtful and creative lighting designers?

We professionals need each other to help us evaluate our work and to improve our design skills. To my mind, this is the difference between a lighting installer and a lighting designer.

Tom

NightScenes
05-30-2008, 10:18 PM
This is all very true Tom!

The Lighting Geek
05-31-2008, 07:54 PM
Tom, I agree with you. I always like to have a customer give an 'Oh my God!'
but what drives me is an insatiable drive to create art with light. I am as fascinated by what I am not lighting as what I am lighting. It is an infectious disease with only one cure: light. That is probably why many times a client is enthralled with what we have done, but I know it could be better. I am my harshest critic.