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barefootlawnsandlandscape
06-09-2008, 11:25 PM
Was at the irrigation house today for lunch with the Rainbird rep. Showed me some new undercut nozzles that look really impressive. He claimed that I could reduce run times by around 30%. Said a 10min. zone can be reduced to a 7min zone.

I was wondering if anyone has some experience with these nozzles. I would like to try and upsell them to some large commercial customers if they do what they say.

I also saw where they are pushing their rotators again. Has anyone been using them after they fixed the bearing problem from a few years ago? It is hard for me to move away from MP's!

hoskm01
06-10-2008, 12:03 AM
UC? Different from U nozzles?

DanaMac
06-10-2008, 12:35 AM
If you're just now getting the undercut nozzles, your supplier is lacking. We started using them heavily in 2002.

Kiril
06-10-2008, 01:05 AM
I use them (U nozzles) almost exclusively for renovations when rotators are not an option. Good nozzles to compensate for poor design (eg. no head to head).

hoskm01
06-10-2008, 01:05 AM
If you're just now getting the undercut nozzles, your supplier is lacking. We started using them heavily in 2002.
Question= answered. Where you been, barefoot, tip-toeing through the tulips?

DanaMac
06-10-2008, 08:01 AM
Tell your suppliers you'd like to try some of the new fangled gear driven rotors, and maybe even a digital controller. I hear those are new too. :)

Seriously, if your supplier and product rep are just now showing those to you, they are slacking and not keeping you informed. Unless they are talking of a new product I have no clue about.

BTW, yes those nozzles work well. No they will not cut water needs or usage by 30%.

Wet_Boots
06-10-2008, 08:08 AM
Will they whiten my teeth and simoniz my sedan?

EagleLandscape
06-10-2008, 08:15 AM
The only way they would cut your water usage down from 10 to 7 is if the precip rate was 30% higher than the original nozzle?

Wouldnt that be a quick sell? Let me upgrade all of your nozzles for $5 bucks a piece and I can reduce your water usage by 30%!!! GUARANTEED!! (nO NEED TO SELL MY SMARTLINES AT 80-100 BUCKS A ZONE THEN HUH?)

barefootlawnsandlandscape
06-10-2008, 08:17 AM
Question= answered. Where you been, barefoot, tip-toeing through the tulips?

I guess we backwoods rednecks here in Arkansas are left in the dark. I guess a little product research on my own would go a long way. So they don't cut water usage at all, or just not by as much as the rep was claiming.

EagleLandscape
06-10-2008, 08:19 AM
I guess we backwoods rednecks here in Arkansas are left in the dark. I guess a little product research on my own would go a long way. So they don't cut water usage at all, or just not by as much as the rep was claiming.

Do you know how they would cut water usage? Do the nozzles have sensors that know when too much water is too much?

Grass needs a certain amount of water each week. It could take 3 minutes to supply that water, or 3 hours. It all depends on the precipitation rate or the nozzles.

barefootlawnsandlandscape
06-10-2008, 08:25 AM
I guess a better word would be run times.

DanaMac
06-10-2008, 08:55 AM
I guess we backwoods rednecks here in Arkansas are left in the dark.

I never said that, for the record. I never even looked to see where you are located.

But the U series is not new. it's at least 6-7 years old. And some of the older brass ones were doing that even earlier.

DanaMac
06-10-2008, 08:59 AM
Also read this previous thread on them.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=230707

Actually, now that I read the thread, we really didn't discuss them much....

barefootlawnsandlandscape
06-10-2008, 09:04 AM
I never said that, for the record. I never even looked to see where you are located.

But the U series is not new. it's at least 6-7 years old. And some of the older brass ones were doing that even earlier.

I didn't take any offense to your comments. I actually thought they were kind of funny. I have only been in the business for 2.5 years, so some things that are not new are still new to me. I thought they were an interesting product, and will probably use them in some applications. I really don't see the need to install them if you are properly spaced and have proper flow. Got to go to work!

Wet_Boots
06-10-2008, 09:05 AM
If they don't reverse my receding hairline and/or drive women wild, what good are they?

Kiril
06-10-2008, 09:55 AM
Do you know how they would cut water usage?

Better DU.......

EagleLandscape
06-10-2008, 12:28 PM
Kiril: Well I know that, but I figured we werent going too high-tech with this question considering the origination of this thread.:)

Tom Tom
06-11-2008, 12:05 AM
Better DU.......

Anyone test these nozzles versus the standard ones? The geek in me wants to know if they are truly 30% better than the standard nozzles.

I'm thinking the undercuts are compensating for a lack of head to head coverage thats lacking in most systems by watering the area directly in front of the head.

That being said, I do use them.

I've noticed that the u15Q dosen't quite seem to water a full 90 degrees when compared to a regular 15Q.

hoskm01
06-11-2008, 01:45 AM
The only way they would cut your water usage down from 10 to 7 is if the precip rate was 30% higher than the original nozzle?



That would do absolutely nothing to usage. Assuming you were trying to put down the same amount of water. Precip is higher=less run time for same water.


Now efficiency is a different story.

Keen
06-13-2008, 07:25 PM
The regular RainBird MPR Nozzle seems to be the standard by which most others are judged. The U-Series has 2 main differences from the regular MPR; First they have the second or "undercut" orifice (duh) & Second the edges of both the orifices have a "heavier" pattern than on a standard nozzle.

From what I understand when the nozzle team @ RainBird looked at how to improve upon the standard MPR nozzle these where the 2 areas they focused on as close in and at the edges is where the patterns have the worst DU/SCs.

Anyway they are supposed to be 30% more efficient so you can run the zone for 7 minutes instead of 10 minutes for example and still get the MINIMUM amount the water down that you need for that zone.

If you look at the catalog the flows are virtually identical so if you run the the zone for 30% less time you use 30% less water.

I have seen them used to fix real performance issues in many problem zones so I for one am a believer. :dancing:

PS: 30% less run time per spray zone can be a lifesaver when dealing with water windows and/or supply/timing issues.

DanaMac
06-14-2008, 09:58 AM
Second the edges of both the orifices have a "heavier" pattern than on a standard nozzle.

Anyone remember the "+" nozzles by Rainbird in the early/mid 90s? What I don't remember is if it had a heavier pattern on the edges, or if it went just past it's designated degree edges of 90, 180 and so forth. I think it was a heavier output on the edges.

Tom Tom
06-14-2008, 11:34 AM
Anyone remember the "+" nozzles by Rainbird in the early/mid 90s? What I don't remember is if it had a heavier pattern on the edges, or if it went just past it's designated degree edges of 90, 180 and so forth. I think it was a heavier output on the edges.

I think I have a few of those laying around.

I also remember they'd get plugged up real easily in the middle.