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jabbo
06-18-2008, 04:21 PM
Installed my sprinkler system about 3 yrs ago. On a well 13 gpm-50 psi. at conn. Put a zone in for flower/shrub beds around house.1" valve w/ flow control then down to 3/4" pvc and used hunter 4" pop-ups. Like everyone else wanted to see them spray.Should have been thinking about how good they would work.Anyway want to convert over to drip and try to use the pvc that is already all around the house.I saw an emitter that screws down onto the pop-up heads that has 4 or 6 connectors for drip lines on it but don't know that much about it.Sorry so long.

Wet_Boots
06-18-2008, 04:38 PM
You need more than that. You are looking towards at least one emitter per shrub, depending on soil conditions. There is also the consideration of durability, if you don't have enough mulch atop the drip stuff.

And as always, you will know that the drip is not working when the plants die, as opposed to sprays you can see.

I thought you thinking about installing a sprinkler system three years ago :)

jabbo
06-18-2008, 08:40 PM
I thought you thinking about installing a sprinkler system three years ago :)

Don't exactly know what you mean. But was more interested in pressure reducer,filter,lines emitters, and whatever else I need to do a good job. In other words what do most of ya'll use in beds around the house????

Wet_Boots
06-18-2008, 08:48 PM
Don't exactly know what you mean. But was more interested in pressure reducer,filter,lines emitters, and whatever else I need to do a good job. In other words what do most of ya'll use in beds around the house????I think I left out a word, while I was concentrating elsewhere. I almost never use drip, because it lacks durability. Are you stating your shrub sprinklers never worked? Or are things overgrown, now, and coverage poor? If someone had a four-figure check for me to set up drip for their shrubs, after I tell them they don't need it, once the shrubs are established, I would be using Rainbird Xerigation products, with the possibility of having to special-order higher-flow emitters, in order to match the flow of an existing zone of sprays.

jabbo
06-18-2008, 09:26 PM
I think I left out a word, while I was concentrating elsewhere. I almost never use drip, because it lacks durability. Are you stating your shrub sprinklers never worked? Or are things overgrown, now, and coverage poor? If someone had a four-figure check for me to set up drip for their shrubs, after I tell them they don't need it, once the shrubs are established, I would be using Rainbird Xerigation products, with the possibility of having to special-order higher-flow emitters, in order to match the flow of an existing zone of sprays.
Actually some of the heads never reached some of the shrubs in the front of the beds to start with so yes all of it has over grown. What I should have done when I was laying the pipe for it was to tilt the female adapters back slightly so that the heads would spray maybe a 25 to 30 degree arc then they would have done alot better.

Wet_Boots
06-18-2008, 09:32 PM
Actually some of the heads never reached some of the shrubs in the front of the beds to start with so yes all of it has over grown. What I should have done when I was laying the pipe for it was to tilt the female adapters back slightly so that the heads would spray maybe a 25 to 30 degree arc then they would have done alot better.Overgrowth is common, but if the shrubs are established, it becomes a non-issue. An uncommon (at least these days) but effective way to feed the front of beds is from sprays or rotors in the lawn, tossing into the beds. That works around the need to add extenders to raise the shrub sprays above the growth.

Kiril
06-19-2008, 12:34 AM
An uncommon (at least these days) but effective way to feed the front of beds is from sprays or rotors in the lawn, tossing into the beds. That works around the need to add extenders to raise the shrub sprays above the growth.

Talk about a bandaid approach. Convert the zone(s) to something that can water under the vegetation. Never ceases to amaze me how much money some people spend on irrigation systems that are worthless in 5-10 years because vegetation has destroyed any possible chance of full coverage.

Are we in need of another tallest riser thread?

Wet_Boots
06-19-2008, 12:57 AM
Talk about a bandaid approach. Convert the zone(s) to something that can water under the vegetation. Never ceases to amaze me how much money some people spend on irrigation systems that are worthless in 5-10 years because vegetation has destroyed any possible chance of full coverage.

Are we in need of another tallest riser thread?Shrub sorinklers in the lawn might seem bizarre, but if you were a homeowner watering shrubs from a hose, you'd be standing in the lawn, moving the hose back and forth, which sounds a lot like a rotor. Since a lot of shrub beds have foliage sloping downward from the house, you can give them effective coverage from in front of the beds. This also allows for a border of annuals in front of the shrubbery.

That this sort of layout can function for decades without needing alteration, is another plus. That keeping heads at ground level allows for PVB backflow protection (compared to having sprays five feet above grade) is a very big plus.

(we await the decision of the Texas judges)

lowvolumejeff
06-19-2008, 01:07 AM
Hi: You might find a retro 1800 Rainbird helpful. You can screw in on one (or more) of your existing risers. Self contains filter and pressure reducer, Easy to attach .700 drip line (Netafim is very good). You can snake that around existing landscape. Even pressure regulated and has check valves. Link to the RB retro http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/1800-RETRO-Retrofit-Kit-p/1800-retro.htm
Jeff

Kiril
06-19-2008, 01:23 AM
0.9 netafim at 12" dripper spacing and 12" spacing on laterals gives you a PR that is pretty damn close to RB MPR nozzles.

jabbo
06-19-2008, 04:09 PM
I was going to put in a pressure reducer and a filter right after my valve(thought thats what most people do).Then maybe buy some of those 4 or 6 conn. emitters and screw them on the heads.Then run my drip lines to the plants, even if some of the plants get 2 or 3 lines each to try to match the 13 gpm pump as close as I can.How does that sound?Just trying to learn this drip thing.Pretty much know how it works just dont know what stuff to use(bubblers, misters,etc...)

Wet_Boots
06-19-2008, 05:13 PM
You might have a lot of drip to buy, if you are going to match up with 13 gpm. I know one supplier who doesn't stock individual emitters that are larger than 2 gph, so from that source, you'd buy 390 emitters, in order to match up flow.

Dripit good
06-19-2008, 05:31 PM
Shrub sorinklers in the lawn might seem bizarre, but if you were a homeowner watering shrubs from a hose, you'd be standing in the lawn, moving the hose back and forth, which sounds a lot like a rotor. Since a lot of shrub beds have foliage sloping downward from the house, you can give them effective coverage from in front of the beds. This also allows for a border of annuals in front of the shrubbery.

That this sort of layout can function for decades without needing alteration, is another plus. That keeping heads at ground level allows for PVB backflow protection (compared to having sprays five feet above grade) is a very big plus.

(we await the decision of the Texas judges)

jabbo.....are you not copying? This should be wonderful advise for you. You seem to be on a mission to drip what you do not need to. I wish we had a job near you so you could spend your energy learning on a job that needs it.

jabbo
06-19-2008, 06:12 PM
jabbo.....are you not copying? This should be wonderful advise for you. You seem to be on a mission to drip what you do not need to. I wish we had a job near you so you could spend your energy learning on a job that needs it.Ok so what is the fix for my situation without having to dig up half the yard and darn near all the flower beds.It just seems to me that if I had drip no matter what kind or where I place shrubs/flowers I can always just move the lines alittle and no big deal.And I can get emitters that put out 20 gph.

Wet_Boots
06-19-2008, 06:18 PM
Maybe you want to create a diagram, so people can understand what you installed and what your plantings are. How many shrubs and how many flowers and what kind of soil (relates to spacing and size of emitters)

jabbo
06-19-2008, 06:29 PM
Maybe you want to create a diagram, so people can understand what you installed and what your plantings are. How many shrubs and how many flowers and what kind of soil (relates to spacing and size of emitters)Well Wet boots, I've got really sandy soil. I've only got 4" pop-ups.I am just thinking unless there is alot of trouble with drip(because I know it don't cost that much)that it would be the way to go IF I can get the gpm matched up pretty good.I've got all the way around my house on 1 zone.I think about 18 or 19 pop-ups. 1/4 and 1/2 sprays.Hunter pro spays.I have Hawthorns staggered with Yaupon holly in the front that dont get any water in most places.In the back we have knock-out roses staggered and some of them don't get any either.

Wet_Boots
06-19-2008, 06:37 PM
Sandy soil makes drip tougher, because the water goes down, instead of spreading horizontally. I would figure to charge at least ten dollars a shrub to install discrete emitters, since there is the inescapable matter of labor. (this is probably the biggest reason that Netafim emitter tubing gets used, instead of discrete emitters)

jabbo
06-19-2008, 08:41 PM
Sandy soil makes drip tougher, because the water goes down, instead of spreading horizontally. I would figure to charge at least ten dollars a shrub to install discrete emitters, since there is the inescapable matter of labor. (this is probably the biggest reason that Netafim emitter tubing gets used, instead of discrete emitters)Well its not THAT sandy.It really does not matter which I use as long asit works.Like I said I don't really know that much about it but I need to do something with the set-up I got going on now because some plants get plenty of water and others get none.And I would really rather not have to do alot of digging unless there is no other way!Thanks for your help.

Wet_Boots
06-19-2008, 08:55 PM
Drip isn't dug in. It gets placed atop the soil. Then you cover it with several inches of mulch (Rainbird recommends 6 inches of mulch)

jabbo
06-19-2008, 09:08 PM
Drip isn't dug in. It gets placed atop the soil. Then you cover it with several inches of mulch (Rainbird recommends 6 inches of mulch)Yes I know,I meant digging to redesign what I already have in place. So what would you do Wet boots?

Wet_Boots
06-19-2008, 09:24 PM
Yes I know,I meant digging to redesign what I already have in place. So what would you do Wet boots?I'd look at the job. Can't see it from here. Sight unseen, I would raise the possibility an additional zone of heads spraying into the beds from the lawn, since there have been few shrub beds I've seen that couldn't be watered from the lawn.

In my neck of the woods, the shrub heads next to a house become unnecessary, because the plants establish themselves, and draw from water that's deeper than the sprinklers can supply. Luckily, the heavier clay soils let the water spread around before it seeps into the ground, so even overgrown sprinklers can contribute.

jabbo
06-19-2008, 09:27 PM
See what you are saying. I'll have to do some more thinking on it. Thanks again.

jabbo
06-19-2008, 09:40 PM
So let me ask this.How does the Netafilm work as far as trying to match it to a specific gpm.And also is this stuff like soaker hose only it leaks out at every 12" or how does it work?

Wet_Boots
06-19-2008, 09:47 PM
You'd run Netafim in row after row, about a foot apart on sandy soil. It would take hundreds of feet of netafim to consume the 13 gpm.

jabbo
06-19-2008, 09:48 PM
You'd run Netafim in row after row, about a foot apart on sandy soil. It would take hundreds of feet of netafim to consume the 13 gpm.So the only option would be to run drip lines and put little heads or whatever they are called on them to shoot right at the base of the plant?

Wet_Boots
06-19-2008, 10:03 PM
So the only option would be to run drip lines and put little heads or whatever they are called on them to shoot right at the base of the plant?How about you come back with a diagram and some photos? Then you can get something more than speculation. Real top-notch drip costs real money. No bargains. Hundreds of dollars.

jabbo
06-19-2008, 10:05 PM
Ok will do.

Dripit good
06-20-2008, 08:12 AM
Ok so what is the fix for my situation without having to dig up half the yard and darn near all the flower beds.It just seems to me that if I had drip no matter what kind or where I place shrubs/flowers I can always just move the lines alittle and no big deal"].And I can get emitters that put out 20 gph.[/COLOR]

Pardon me. I was under the impression the plantings were well established.

Who is the manufacture of these? Netafim's 7gph are the largest that we use.........with an operating pressure of 20 to 55psi we use them for problem/deficient areas within the spray zone.

jabbo
04-19-2010, 08:32 AM
I'm digging this thread up because I'm still interested in trying to convert my beds to drip. Does anybody have any pics of an install/running they have done using emitters. Thanks...

Wet_Boots
04-19-2010, 09:40 AM
We're still waiting for your diagram of the plantings. A few more years. and we're liable to lose interest. :p

jabbo
04-19-2010, 09:58 AM
We're still waiting for your diagram of the plantings. A few more years. and we're liable to lose interest. :p
Do you know how much dang trouble you are??? LoL. Really and truly I've been reading all these post where ya'll have been giving these new guys hell and got jealous so I decided to get something started again...I guess I'll try to get something together...geez...:p

Wet_Boots
04-19-2010, 10:10 AM
In all seriousness, you may never see a good photo shoot of discrete emitters being installed. The last install I did would have required me to be wearing "camera glasses", and even then, the foliage would have gotten in the way.

Bring some photos of these beds. Be prepared to explain why you can't use in-lawn sprays or rotors to water these beds.