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nusec
07-07-2008, 05:21 PM
I live in NJ and I am looking at a lawn/landscaping biz down Florida. The business has been established for 12yrs by same owner who is leaving the State. does anyone have any tips for me on my new adventure ? Thanks

mowerbrad
07-07-2008, 06:34 PM
have you already bought it?

Wayne's Lawn Service
07-08-2008, 11:01 AM
Florida is a completely different market. If you think you have competition in NJ, wait until you get in Florida.

Yes there is money to be made everywhere, but grass, plants, and the landscape is completely different. Methodology is similar, but market is very different.

Good luck and buy a lot of sun screen!

bohiaa
07-08-2008, 06:35 PM
there are so many in's and outs with doing this.....

consult an attorney..........

you may find that the company is being sued or something like that....

there are a ton of what if's

Good luck

NOOB
07-08-2008, 08:01 PM
Ill sell you my whole biz
********************
-Michael

No email addresses please. Use Phone or PM Charles

DuraCutter
07-08-2008, 11:07 PM
I live in NJ and I am looking at a lawn/landscaping biz down Florida. The business has been established for 12yrs by same owner who is leaving the State. does anyone have any tips for me on my new adventure ? Thanks

You sound like my kinda guy.

Also, I've got some property in Florida for sale... thought you might be interested...:laugh:

Good luck btw...

:)

nusec
07-09-2008, 06:59 AM
Where Is Your Property Located ?

nusec
07-09-2008, 07:01 AM
No I Haven't Bought It . Just Looking Into The Business.

BillyRgn
07-09-2008, 12:38 PM
dosen't matter how established it is, the ""new owner"" mentality will get around, and you will lose alot. i bought an established busniess to grow mine, and i would never do it again, i know my work is 10 times beter but people are weird, you will be lucky to keep a profitable number of the clients for year 2

topsites
07-10-2008, 12:46 AM
If you have the money why not get your own, why someone else's?

Because this isn't corporate America where everyone takes a number, even if we do come off like that some days I know for a fact most customers are our customers for the simple truth that we are who we are... Here this below explains it further:

dosen't matter how established it is, the ""new owner"" mentality will get around, and you will lose alot. i bought an established busniess to grow mine, and i would never do it again, i know my work is 10 times beter but people are weird, you will be lucky to keep a profitable number of the clients for year 2

You see...

What this man is saying is you will lose customers basically just because you're not the other guy, this weirdness actually translates to customer loyalty and in that way I'm funny too... This goes way deeper than doing a good job or being the least expensive (thou that certainly does help), and I hate to say it but it gets down right personal some days lmao

True customer loyalty means I can actually treat my own customers worse than someone else ever would and they still stick with me, the really loyal ones are the kind to stick with me through thick and thin and down to the very end and that's the truth (thou I will also say it has surprised me more than once to find out who was true blue and who jumps ship when you'd least expect it :confused:).

So taking over someone else's business isn't all it's cracked up to be, at least not from the small business stand point.

DuraCutter
07-10-2008, 12:55 AM
Where Is Your Property Located ?

It's in a hum... kind of a swampy spot. They say it's easy to drain if you keep a 200hp pump going all the time though... :laugh:

Once drained, it's great, though you have to watch out for the crocs...they'll prolly be unhappy about the whole thing.

Just thought I'd offer it to you, seing you're in the buying mood and don't seem too fussy.

:laugh:

cpel2004
07-10-2008, 02:24 AM
Make sure the owner stays around for at least one year and is involved in day to day operations. I think most of the lawn businesses here are over priced. Why dont you move down first and then make a decision?

BillyRgn
07-10-2008, 12:31 PM
remember it is actually illegal to sell accounts, because you don't own them, so when you buy a business, you are buying equipment and the business name, how ever usually when you buy a business, you want to change it to your own name, to avoid future legal issues, just my 2 cents from my experience. also if you do purchase the business, which i don't recommend doing, make sure you have a lawyer draw up a serious contract with all the equipment and terms. Also make sure it has a no competition clause, many times, people have sold there business to get out of legal trouble or just to sell it because they need money or want it and then they open a new business right back up. Then some how end up getting back all the clients that were sold to you. i had a friend who bought half of a guys business because then guy was looking to down size, 40 lawns and some equipment. Within a year and a half the guy had every single one of the 40 clients back and brand new equipment and to top it off the guy who sold the business was friends with the kid who bought the businesses father. The contract has to have a no competition clause that states that the seller can not compete on the clients being sold for X amount of years, or the seller cannot open a business within X amount of miles from the location because people sell sometimes because they are moving and will start a business at there new location. It does not matter how nice the guy is or how honest he seems, or who knows him People are snakes looking to get one up. There is a guy in my area that over the course of about 15 years has sold his business 3 times, he builds up a business and sells the equipment truck and accounts for a sh** load of money(in my mind way more than it is worth, but he gets it) Then buys a brand new truck, trailer, walk behind, and riding mower in cash and starts to build up the same business again and the cycle starts over again. i think the last business sold for about $120,000 which was for a 1996 F-350 gas mason dump with plow, 18 ft big Tex open landscape trailer, 48" exmark metro and a 60" exmark lazer, both mowers with a lot of hours(i'd pay tops $4,000 for both) and about 100 lawn accounts. he kept his back hoe and equipment trailer and kept all his snow plowing accounts. he then went and bought a brand new GMC 3500 Duramax mason dump with a plow, a new 18 ft big Tex open trailer, a new scag 48" hydro walk behind, and a new 60" ex-mark lazer, which i think was a total of about $55,000. and still had $65,000 in his pocket to open his tanning salon, not bad right, because now i see him cutting lawns that he sold and driving around his hummer or corvette that are both no older than 3 or 4 years.

cpel2004
07-11-2008, 07:32 PM
Where did you get that information from, any proof(writing)? I think you have been mislead.

hillcountry
07-12-2008, 12:41 PM
I took over an established buisness and my client retention was high. I also made the effort to work for the prior owner and meet all of the clients in order to build a relationship with them prior to the switch. We mailed the clients a nice letter with my credentials to show the clients that they were gaining and not losing. Every situation is different and it will also depend on the type of person his clients are. It was a tough decision for me and I hope this helps

BillyRgn
07-16-2008, 12:51 PM
Where did you get that information from, any proof(writing)? I think you have been mislead.

what info ? all the things i have said happened to me or some close friends

scottgalat
07-17-2008, 10:07 PM
If you have excellent work habits. A customer service oriented attitude, and lawn care skills you can succeed beyond your wildest dreams. Lawn customers will 100% retain you if you provide them with great service, a reasonable price and friendly professional attitude. To lose customers is not a "normal" thing. The lawn customer dosen't enjoy hunting for new lawn care providers. It's semi-tramatic. If large numbers of accounts are leaving
in the first year, the problem is not with the method of aquisition. It is with the inability of the new company to supply the level of service that keeps them happy. Don't believe for one second that they won't give you a great opportunity to show your stuff. If you do great work, 100% on time, your fairly priced and your a pleasure to do business with, Why would they drop you? Your the perfect lawn company... You'll retain 100% of the customers and you'll see 100% of your money each month because they won't risk losing you. Most Florida lawn care operators do not live up to this simple business philosiphy, and they lose accounts, and blame everything EXCEPT the actual cause... poor customer service.
Additionally, There is always a number of good lawn companies for sale in Florida. Figure out those that sound interesting and come down and
visit many of them. give yourself some options. Examine as many as you can. Some are very poorly run. Others are run professionally, You want the second kind. Work with them a few days (free of course) ask questions continuously (even stupid ones) and take notes of the answers learn everything about the service you intend to buy... before you pay for it.
No surprises. You'll know the equipment because you've tried it.
Be wary of used equipment. Encourage the sellers to reduce their price
and sell their gear elsewhere. They have already taken the best years of life from the equipment... and your going to be paying for the upkeep of equipment you had no benefit of operating when new. You can buy entire new equipment packages very reasonably and you'll get full warranties and if you've decent credit... you can get no payments for a year.... Make $60,000 with the gear before payment one. That's how you get started.
If you would like some more advice or would like some info on some routes for sale I'd be glad to help. (321) 216-1837.

Octav66
08-26-2013, 04:45 PM
Michael did u sell yet