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procut
07-16-2008, 12:55 AM
This is a Japanese Maple that I'm told has been established about 8 to 10 years. Each year it starts out great, but come about June, many of the leaves discolor and look "dried out" or "dead" We're in zone 5, but the tree is realitivly protected during the winter months on the north side of the house. Any ideas on what exactly this is and/or what could be done to remidy it? Thanks!

procut
07-16-2008, 12:58 AM
A better view...............

Merlin300
07-16-2008, 09:12 AM
Do you have pic of the whole tree and the surrounding landscape?

EA Quinn
07-16-2008, 09:25 AM
was this transplanted from another place or planted there from day one?

Az Gardener
07-16-2008, 09:45 AM
It looks like salt burn to me. Does it get any effluent water? If it is salt burn try some citric acid or some of bills organic teas.

h400exinfl
07-16-2008, 08:30 PM
Are they watering from above in the hot sun?

bigviclbi
07-16-2008, 09:16 PM
Mine got burned by some salty air and looks just like that. Thought it was protected enough but we had a storm and it turned out looking likr this. The new leaves are ok.

RedWingsDet
07-16-2008, 09:23 PM
I have the same exact problem, however the tree is really mature, and about 20-25ft tall.
Limbs are dying, rapidly too. Anything I can do? Last year it looked great, this year it looks terrible.

procut
07-16-2008, 09:57 PM
It was transplanted from the east cost, (Possibly New Jersey) so I am told. Its in a residential setting, and I don't believe there is any salt used on the drive in the winter.

Tomorrow I'll get a pic of the whole tree and suroundings.

PSUturf
07-16-2008, 11:25 PM
How about lack of water? Jap Maples in sunny or windy areas will exhibit these symptoms when there is not enough moisture available. The drought stress will predispose the tree to disease problems. Make sure the root zone is covered with mulch and water thoroughly once a week.

EA Quinn
07-17-2008, 08:12 AM
When it was transplanted, did anybody make sure to plant it in the same direction from the place it was taken out from? (meaning put a ribbon on the north side, and then making sure that ribbon was on the north side in the new location?)

Merlin300
07-17-2008, 08:49 AM
How about lack of water? Jap Maples in sunny or windy areas will exhibit these symptoms when there is not enough moisture available. The drought stress will predispose the tree to disease problems. Make sure the root zone is covered with mulch and water thoroughly once a week.


This is kinda what I was thinking. Thats why I wanted to see pics of the whole tree and surrounding area. From the pics already posted, it looks like the tree is near concrete and stone was use for mulch. That is alot of heat reflection from the sun.

It would explain why it starts out good during the spring, then the sun and heat kick in putting stress on the tree.

BrandonV
07-17-2008, 06:30 PM
all ours just about do that here. its caused by having warmer night time temps, nothing you can do. it'll get its color back in the fall

Lite4
07-17-2008, 10:30 PM
The ones around here that do that are usually sun burned in the heat of summer. I just had a customer lose one to verticilium wilt. Half the tree died. Shame, it was a beautiful full moon maple. Acer Japonicum 'acontifolium'

procut
07-18-2008, 01:03 AM
Here is a pic of the surroundings. I thought I'd mention the soil in this location isn't good. I is really heavy clay, in the summer it is literally like concrete, so that definatly doesn't help matters any. Thanks for the replies thus far.

02DURAMAX
07-18-2008, 04:48 AM
looks like heat stress.. all that heat from the rock during the day and if you dont water its not helping.

JNyz
07-18-2008, 07:25 AM
Why don't you just have a professional look at it?

Az Gardener
07-18-2008, 10:44 AM
Why don't you just have a professional look at it?

He is having many professionals looking at it. I can't speak for others but I am a certified Arborist and a Certified Landscape Professional. I teach classes, judge industry awards contests and have been in the industry for over 25 years.

If I were there in person I would
check to see its not buried too deep, root ball flush with top of grade no more than 2" of compost/mulch covering.

use a probe and see how wet /dry t the soil is


If it were here I would bet on salt burn, but I am not familiar with the soil in the region. It may be as simple as the clay soil wicking the moisture from the more porous nursery potting mix they used. The root ball may be drying out even if the surrounding soil is moist. But you have to get on your knees and look around, he can do that.


Now he just has to do something. We have a saying "fix it or kill it trying" but get on with it. Our attitude would be a little different with a more expensive specimen but c'mon its a $ 150 maple.

Firefighter337
07-18-2008, 11:40 AM
Right next to the drive way, right next to the water hose.

Could be that someone cleaned a bucket/jug/container of something right there and it might of damaged the tree.

Harley-D
07-18-2008, 01:26 PM
I would move it anyway. Is it a 'dissectum'? I would say some sort of water issue whether it's due to salt or poor soil. I would get it outta there, it'll get too big for that space eventually anyway. dig a huge hole somewhere else, add organics and soil amendment(loose peat and bark) and plant 2" high. I love those trees, especially about 30years from now.

JNyz
07-18-2008, 05:25 PM
He is having many professionals looking at it. I can't speak for others but I am a certified Arborist and a Certified Landscape Professional. I teach classes, judge industry awards contests and have been in the industry for over 25 years.

If I were there in person I would
check to see its not buried too deep, root ball flush with top of grade no more than 2" of compost/mulch covering.

use a probe and see how wet /dry t the soil is


If it were here I would bet on salt burn, but I am not familiar with the soil in the region. It may be as simple as the clay soil wicking the moisture from the more porous nursery potting mix they used. The root ball may be drying out even if the surrounding soil is moist. But you have to get on your knees and look around, he can do that.


Now he just has to do something. We have a saying "fix it or kill it trying" but get on with it. Our attitude would be a little different with a more expensive specimen but c'mon its a $ 150 maple.


First off I do not mean for this to come off as a flame.

You are from AZ not CT where the problem is. To get the correct dianosis he needs a professional from his zone to come take a look at it. All the posters on this thread are just giving an educated or uneducated guess. It could be as simple as a girdling root but you can't see that from a couple of pics. He needs to pick up the phone.

Az Gardener
07-18-2008, 05:52 PM
First off I do not mean for this to come off as a flame.

You are from AZ not CT where the problem is. To get the correct dianosis he needs a professional from his zone to come take a look at it. All the posters on this thread are just giving an educated or uneducated guess. It could be as simple as a girdling root but you can't see that from a couple of pics. He needs to pick up the phone.

No offense taken and I hope I don't offend you by saying a girdling root will show significantly different symptoms. That is not a girdling root problem in AZ, CT or Japan. We have some Maples here and clay soil too. They are very difficult to grow here but it is possible. Most times these problems are simple and it makes no sense to me to pay for a consult on a tree that may not be worth the cost of the consult. JMHO, now if your talking a 200 yr old Oak that is an integral part of the L/S by all means call the best Arborist in the region.

LawnVet
07-18-2008, 06:29 PM
First off I do not mean for this to come off as a flame.

You are from AZ not CT where the problem is. To get the correct dianosis he needs a professional from his zone to come take a look at it. All the posters on this thread are just giving an educated or uneducated guess. It could be as simple as a girdling root but you can't see that from a couple of pics. He needs to pick up the phone.

Sorry but I have to light the flame! Problem is in MI, not AZ or CT. That being said, the advice is good, and this appears to be a little "oh by the way" thing a customer is asking Procut, not a dire situation where a certified arborist has to come out and take a close look. Doubt the customer would even think it would be worth the consult fee. Lawnsite is a great library of advice IMO. Just my $.02

JimLewis
07-19-2008, 02:38 AM
looks like heat stress.. all that heat from the rock during the day and if you dont water its not helping.

Bingo!

The answer was actually in the original post; "Each year it starts out great, but come about June..."

Well, think about it. What happens round about June every year? It gets a little HOT? And so let's take this a step further; What happens when it gets a little hot? Two things actually.

1) Trees need to drink more water
2) Natural rainfall decreases.

So right when demand for water is going way up, it's usual supply for water has disappeared.

So what I normally get asked next is; "Ok. So you're saying it isn't getting enough water? But I am watering it as much as the other plants and all the other plants are still looking okay." Fine. Maybe you are. But for some reason this particular plant isn't taking the stress as well as the others. Perhaps it's the horrible clay soil you describe. Perhaps this tree requires more water than the other plants do.

But the point is; if everything else has stayed constant and the only thing that's really changed is the heat and the amount of natural rainfall - that's usually your answer!

RigglePLC
07-19-2008, 08:41 AM
I agree with the guy that said the stone mulch is not good. Is it limestone? You need a soil test--correct any pH problems. Check for iron and other deficiencies. Testing the actual tissue is ideal (a tissue minerals test is best). Correct any drainage problems. Perhaps drill holes and do a vertical mulch with aeration plan. Probably wise to install a tiny drip emitter for irrigation, (but be sure drainage is OK). Heat reflection from stone and concrete is a likely contributor, as mentioned above. Is this north side? West side?

AGLA
07-19-2008, 09:30 PM
A lot of diseases become active under conditions that happen at certain times of year as well. You see that with rust on horse chestnut as an annual event in many places as an example. I would not rule out a fungus.

SimonCX
07-19-2008, 09:59 PM
Personally I think it's form the heat, you have concerete and rock around it so the sun heats both up and it doesn't give the soil a chance to cool down. If the soil is dry try gator bags and don't water the leaves of the tree in the direct sun or it will burn the leaves. Also I would move it because give it 4-5 years and it will take up that whole area.

procut
07-20-2008, 12:28 AM
Ok, thanks for all of the replies. I'll suggest deep watering for a while and see if it makes a differance.

Isobel
07-20-2008, 11:50 AM
It was transplanted from the east cost, (Possibly New Jersey) so I am told. Its in a residential setting, and I don't believe there is any salt used on the drive in the winter.

Tomorrow I'll get a pic of the whole tree and suroundings.

just remember that even if there isn't salt used on the driveway, there's salt on the roads. That salt can come up onto the driveway from the tires of cars. It can also come from the main road, if they get their driveway plowed.

RedWingsDet
07-20-2008, 10:57 PM
I realize every year around this time jap maples usually under go stress because of the weather, concluding the leaves may change in appearance.

However, I have a different problem, check out the bark. Is there anything I can do? Is it a lost hope? Thanks!

JimLewis
07-21-2008, 03:28 AM
That tree is dying. Not sure what from.

Ask M.D. Vaden. He's a member of this site. I bet he'd know exactly what was wrong with that tree and why.

mdvaden
07-21-2008, 04:21 AM
That tree is dying. Not sure what from.

Ask M.D. Vaden. He's a member of this site. I bet he'd know exactly what was wrong with that tree and why.

Ah - hah ...

The caped crusader drops in :weightlifter:

LOL

So - I'd be scratching my head about that one a bit. Seems like verticillium ain't the cause.

Honestly, did not read most replies yet. First impression looking at the image is a lot of hard surface around it - wall, rock, concrete. Possibly too much reflected heat, and maybe heavy soil.

In heavy clay, rock mulch can seal soil, cutting off half the gas exchance between soil and atmosphere.

Anywhere the rock is pressed tight, it's a near equivilent of laying plastic over the soil. The only "breathing" is between the stones. One more thing to consider anyway.

HEY JIM ...

Tried to call you tonight - note my "BIDDING LANDMINE" post in this same landscaping forum.

I figured if the people found me via the internet, you could be potentially next in line for contact, if not already called.

:)

Merlin300
07-21-2008, 09:11 AM
O.k. we have a tree person on here that said the same thing I and several others have said. Get some water on that tree.

I would try using the tree problem to sell your customer some bark mulch and get rid of the stone mulch. Some money to be made there.

JimLewis
07-21-2008, 11:45 AM
Mario,

I was talking more about the tree in the photos just before my last response. Different tree. Did you see those photos???

mdvaden
07-21-2008, 07:07 PM
Mario,

I was talking more about the tree in the photos just before my last response. Different tree. Did you see those photos???

Excellent chance of sunburn ...

http://www.mdvaden.com/sunscald.shtml

We are on our second home in a row where we got a tree with sunburn from trees removed next door, or a limb removed allowing sunshine to burn bark.

The one now, is a magnolia, with one limb as bad as the maple in the photo. I pruned the limb off, and think the rest of the tree is okay.

The J. maple in the image is worse-off than our tree.

Might be hard to tell without seeing in person, but a replacement might be coming down the pike.

dixieking
07-24-2008, 11:47 AM
How about lack of water? Jap Maples in sunny or windy areas will exhibit these symptoms when there is not enough moisture available. The drought stress will predispose the tree to disease problems. Make sure the root zone is covered with mulch and water thoroughly once a week.

ill add to that
the best time to water is either early in the morning or late in the evening to prevent water lose!:usflag:

JimLewis
07-24-2008, 12:07 PM
ill add to that
the best time to water is either early in the morning or late in the evening to prevent water lose!:usflag:

I'll add to that. Best time to water is early morning.

Watering in the evening on warm summer nights sets up the perfect breeding ground for insects and disease.