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View Full Version : What are pros/cons of Netafim?


Stuttering Stan
07-20-2008, 08:52 PM
Please don't throw knives at me for asking this. I am trying to learn the biz and reading all I can. Several people like Netafim, but I just can't see why?

FIMCO-MEISTER
07-20-2008, 08:55 PM
Please don't throw knives at me for asking this. I am trying to learn the biz and reading all I can. Several people like Netafim, but I just can't see why?

Why don't you tell us your experience with it and why you don't like it. I have pros and cons on netafim.

We don't throw knives just glue daubers.

EagleLandscape
07-20-2008, 09:35 PM
...glue daubers sharpened to a point... without the actual dauber:-D

Waterit
07-20-2008, 09:48 PM
Can't wait for Kiril to see this thread...

Tom Tom
07-21-2008, 08:50 AM
Please don't throw knives at me for asking this. I am trying to learn the biz and reading all I can. Several people like Netafim, but I just can't see why?


Here's a garden on Netafim that waters 35 to 40 minutes every 3 days

Kiril
07-21-2008, 09:45 AM
Can't wait for Kiril to see this thread...

lol, why is that?

The reason for using netafim or similar is simple .... water conservation.

rockee
07-21-2008, 10:15 AM
Please don't throw knives at me for asking this. I am trying to learn the biz and reading all I can. Several people like Netafim, but I just can't see why?

Are you asking how Netafim compares to other drip line (manufacturers) or are you using the name Netafim generically to ask why drip line should be used compared to mist heads or rotors?

jeffinsgf
07-21-2008, 10:38 AM
TomTom,

That's what I am going to do to my raised beds before next Spring. I used micro-sprays this year, and regret it. It looks like you have your lines spaced about 18 inches apart -- is that right? Why on the surface instead of buried? Emitters facing up or down? Are your headers made with solid Netafim, or do they have emitters, too?

dhess
07-21-2008, 05:18 PM
one negative thing I've found about using drip in general is that it difficult to tell if a line is clogged if it is hidden underneath mulch, dirt, grass, plants ect.

Watering wise, drip works great, but if you get any snags, clogs, breaks ect...your only real indications sometimes might be too late when the plants are dead or dying.

The other problem is weeding might be more difficult. You can't go sticking just anything in the ground anymore when you have a drip system underneath :(

I also hate how the Netafim isn't real pliable so its difficult to unroll and keep straight..I think Rainbirds drip line is the same way. Maybe I keep getting a bad roll, but I swear it kinks up all the time.

Good luck trying to roll it back up if you don't use it all too. I just cut it up into pieces myself.

Maybe I haven't found the trick to unrolling the Netafim, but I had to do a 500 ft run on one property on a cold day and unrolling, un-kinking, and sticking in the adapters was a real pain in the ass.

I'm talking Texas cold too (50-60 degrees) which is nothing compared to you guys up North probably.

After it warmed up things got a little easier, along with finding out the real trick was to not twist the adapters in but move them back and forth.

Kiril
07-22-2008, 12:10 AM
So when did this thread turn into a whine and cry session? Jeez :rolleyes:

FIMCO-MEISTER
07-22-2008, 07:08 AM
lol, why is that?

The reason for using netafim or similar is simple .... water conservation.

After all a netafim system can never run too long.:rolleyes:



To be a contrarian let's consider all the wasted water from damaged netafim. Since nobody can see the damage the dried out plants cause the user to crank up the time using more water. This drowns other plants leading to plant replacement of both the dried out and overwatered. These are plants using mucho water at a nursery which will be replaced by other plants using mucho water after they are sold. These plants require mucho water after planting and the HO pays mucho dollars repairing his netafim. HO changes lawn services and the cycle repeats itself. The bottom line is that netafim cannot be serviced very easily. The best one can do is get a flow reading at the meter when it is freshly installed and check that flow reading on future service calls. If it is the same then all is okay, maybe. If much higher then start scrounging around in the shrubs.

FIMCO-MEISTER
07-22-2008, 07:13 AM
TomTom,

That's what I am going to do to my raised beds before next Spring. I used micro-sprays this year, and regret it. It looks like you have your lines spaced about 18 inches apart -- is that right? Why on the surface instead of buried? Emitters facing up or down? Are your headers made with solid Netafim, or do they have emitters, too?

Why do you regret the micros? Is this a grass is always greener on the other side of the fence thing? At least with micro you can turn off unneeded sprayers and apply appropriate amounts. With netafim you have to water the whole bed every time with the same volume.

jeffinsgf
07-22-2008, 07:37 AM
Why do you regret the micros? Is this a grass is always greener on the other side of the fence thing? At least with micro you can turn off unneeded sprayers and apply appropriate amounts. With netafim you have to water the whole bed every time with the same volume.

You bring up some good points. The first issue is wet tomato leaves. We had a very wet spring. Between the rainfall and the XPCN sprays, I got a little black spot on my tomatoes. I have lost all the lower foliage, and have been chasing the fungus away with chemicals I don't want to use and foliage removal I don't want to remove. Even in the downward pointing mode, the XPCN's are getting the leaves wet. The second issue is blockage. The big leaffies, like chard, spinach and beets, seem to block the sprays in either up or down mode. And if the up mode clears the leaffies, it once again is hitting the tomatoes. The beds are only 4' x 4', so having plants with different water requirements in the same bed is unlikely. Each of the four beds is a separate zone, so I only have to group by water requirements when planting. If you have a better plan for putting the water on or in the ground without wetting the leaves and getting blocked, I am all ears (or eyes in this case).

FIMCO-MEISTER
07-22-2008, 07:41 AM
You bring up some good points. The first issue is wet tomato leaves. We had a very wet spring. Between the rainfall and the XPCN sprays, I got a little black spot on my tomatoes. I have lost all the lower foliage, and have been chasing the fungus away with chemicals I don't want to use and foliage removal I don't want to remove. Even in the downward pointing mode, the XPCN's are getting the leaves wet. The second issue is blockage. The big leaffies, like chard, spinach and beets, seem to block the sprays in either up or down mode. And if the up mode clears the leaffies, it once again is hitting the tomatoes. The beds are only 4' x 4', so having plants with different water requirements in the same bed is unlikely. Each of the four beds is a separate zone, so I only have to group by water requirements when planting. If you have a better plan for putting the water on or in the ground without wetting the leaves and getting blocked, I am all ears (or eyes in this case).

Look into agrifim. Reuse existing setup but convert sprayers to 1/4" 6"spaced .5gph agrifim. More even row watering.

Kiril
07-22-2008, 08:17 AM
After all a netafim system can never run too long.:rolleyes:

The most efficient system in the world means nothing if managed by fools.

Tom Tom
07-22-2008, 05:58 PM
It looks like you have your lines spaced about 18 inches apart -- is that right? Why on the surface instead of buried? Emitters facing up or down? Are your headers made with solid Netafim, or do they have emitters, too?

lines are spaced 12", with .6 emitters spaced 12"

Placed on surface because i can easily lift out the grid, amend/till in spring, and then set it back down.

The emitters face all different ways.

rockee
07-22-2008, 10:43 PM
Please don't throw knives at me for asking this. I am trying to learn the biz and reading all I can. Several people like Netafim, but I just can't see why?

I am NOT an expert but will try to answer concerning my limited experience. I have tried 3 different types of drip:
1. Soaker hose - not sure if this is really drip line. It is relatively inexpensive, but using this with high pressure (80+) tends to cause holes in hose to burst and get larger. It is a good low-cost solution, but the hose is of low quality and not true "state-of-the-art".

2. Toro Blue-line - This is sold through retail outlets such as HD and possibly Lowes. It is a 1/2" line with emitters every 18". Kits are available with additional emitters, which come in various GPH sizes. Also, they sell 1/4" stripe drip-line which may be a bit wider, with emitter at 12" or 18", and various GPH sizes. I have found that this line seems to be a bit less prone to kinks then the Netafim. It is close tothe same price as the Netafim. The connectors are relatively easy to install, but they also are prone to leak and must be reinforced with stee clamps.

3. Netfim and Netafim CV - I have used the Netfim non CV. The CV indicates that there are check-valves built in which prevent water from coming back into the line.he diameter is slightly narrower than the Toro blue-stripe. I have found the barb clamps tough to install but they tend not to leak. I have been able to add Toro emitters and microdrip to the Netafim. The Netafim is not sold through retail outlets - only at supply houses. All connections are available, as are emitters and micro-drip.

I have seen no great difference between the drip from either the Toro or Netfim but possibly I don't have an accurate way to measure the drip from each. Most irrigators in this area tend to use Netafim, possibly because this is the brand that most supply houses carry.

The main problem I have seen with the Netfin is that after it kinks it is nearly impossible to get rid of the kink, while the Toro doesn't kink as easily and kinks can be gotten rid of.

I'd be curious to see if anyone has had experience with any other brands of drip line. Has anyone used the Toro orange stripe and besides the fact that it is available with emitters 12" spaced, is there any other benefit over blue-stripe? Are there are other pros concerning the Netafim?

In principle, it seems like if properly used for shrub-beds versus lawn areas, drip-line is a better solution, yet installation in beds is more labor intensive since plant bases must be properly hit to be sure there is enough watering.