PDA

View Full Version : Flowmeter?


5.0
07-29-2008, 07:59 AM
When designing a new system, how do you check GPM? I was taught the 5 gal. bucket method, but it just seems kind of low-tech...

AI Inc
07-29-2008, 08:41 AM
Low tech , but it dosnt lie.

Wet_Boots
07-29-2008, 09:03 AM
Just watch out for metric buckets.

Mike Leary
07-29-2008, 01:29 PM
There are a couple of more accurate methods, one inexpensive, one pricey.
The cheaper one is www.betterwaterind.com
Click on "Sentry I Flow meter.

For balls on accuracy, we have this, which is battery-operated. Hooks up
to a Data Industrial flow meter with pressure gauge & throttle valve.

greenmonster304
07-29-2008, 08:10 PM
I use this for big jobs

Kiril
07-30-2008, 01:23 AM
I'm rebuilding my own as well. Will post some pics once all the parts are in.

Kiril
07-30-2008, 01:35 AM
For balls on accuracy, we have this, which is battery-operated. Hooks up
to a Data Industrial flow meter with pressure gauge & throttle valve.

Or how about this one?

http://www.omega.com/pptst/FD-400.html

JimLewis
07-30-2008, 05:47 AM
I still use the one in the picture-link below. Simple Toro pressure/flow meter. It's not too awfully accurate. But if you follow the directions it gives you a pretty good idea of what the flow is. I don't depend on it for perfect accuracy. But having used it for so many years now I can get a pretty dang good idea of where the flow is at 30 psi.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51vSIjV42RL._SL500_AA280_.jpg



.

FIMCO-MEISTER
07-30-2008, 07:36 AM
I put my hand under the faucet at full blast.

Kiril
07-30-2008, 09:38 AM
I put my hand under the faucet at full blast.

ROFL .... Down in TX, We call it Flow Witchin

Mike Leary
07-30-2008, 10:13 AM
Or how about this one?

Sweet........:clapping:

Kiril
07-30-2008, 10:19 AM
Sweet........:clapping:

Yea, I get chills and sweaty palms looking at that. Then I look at the price ... :dizzy:

Mike Leary
07-30-2008, 10:25 AM
Yea, I get chills and sweaty palms looking at that. Then I look at the price ... :dizzy:

Looks nice sitting next to the Calsense.

Kiril
07-30-2008, 10:28 AM
Looks nice sitting next to the Calsense.

Yes it would. Did you check out the thread size on the insertion probe .... 1.5". That ain't intended for no dinky pipe system.

Wet_Boots
07-30-2008, 10:39 AM
A turbine sensor is far more accurate. You could buy one on eBay cheap enough.

Kiril
07-30-2008, 10:46 AM
A turbine sensor is far more accurate. You could buy one on eBay cheap enough.

Soooooo? Can you take a flow measurement with one without cutting pipe or without having a sensor port available?

What a kill-joy http://www.websmileys.com/sm/crazy/265.gif

Wet_Boots
07-30-2008, 10:54 AM
The right turbine sensor would probably be in a 3/4 or 1 inch body, and would have a range from a fraction to over 30 gpm. Trick is to have a compact readout, since most of those were made for factory process installations.

irrig8r
07-30-2008, 11:17 AM
http://www.netafimusa.net/downloads/GHN/A029-Flow-Meter.pdf

Mike Leary
07-30-2008, 01:26 PM
http://www.netafimusa.net/downloads/GHN/A029-Flow-Meter.pdf

That's neat, I did'nt know they made one, Hank is going to try the Hunter
version that shorts the common.

DanaMac
07-30-2008, 02:08 PM
When designing a new system, how do you check GPM? I was taught the 5 gal. bucket method, but it just seems kind of low-tech...

if you do this off a traditional hose faucet/spigot then you may get a wrong reading. Out here the copper pipe reduces to 1/2" before the faucet.

JimLewis
07-30-2008, 02:42 PM
if you do this off a traditional hose faucet/spigot then you may get a wrong reading. Out here the copper pipe reduces to 1/2" before the faucet.

Agreed. But if you're giving an estimate and just trying to get an IDEA of whether they have a lot of pressure or low pressure - a lot of flow or low flow - what else are you going to do??? Dig a hole and cut into their water main and hook up a pressure/flow tester there????? Come on.

Hooking up to a hose bib is often the only thing that is practical - at least until you actually get the job and tie into the water main.

Mike Leary
07-30-2008, 04:12 PM
Hooking up to a hose bib is often the only thing that is practical - at least until you actually get the job and tie into the water main.

Exactly how we do it. use the cheap tester, then measure with either once
the tie-in is completed, after the backflow assembly.

DanaMac
07-30-2008, 05:10 PM
Agreed. But if you're giving an estimate and just trying to get an IDEA of whether they have a lot of pressure or low pressure - a lot of flow or low flow - what else are you going to do??? Dig a hole and cut into their water main and hook up a pressure/flow tester there????? Come on.

Hooking up to a hose bib is often the only thing that is practical - at least until you actually get the job and tie into the water main.

I'm just saying it's not the most accurate way to do it. lot of you talk about doing things the right or best way and that is not the way to check for proper flow. When I was installing I did it the bucket method too. Or just assumed that the other people in the area we worked on that have good GPM with 3/4" supply would be similar.

This doesn't give proper flow readings which would dictate more or less valves, more or less wire, or bigger controllers.

Wet_Boots
07-30-2008, 05:14 PM
The trick is to write your proposals with enough wiggle room for you to modify a design after making and testing the supply connection.

JimLewis
07-30-2008, 05:27 PM
The trick is to write your proposals with enough wiggle room for you to modify a design after making and testing the supply connection.

Exactly. That's why I don't care so much whether my cheaper pressure/flow meter is balls-on accurate or not. When I am giving a bid, I am just trying to get an IDEA of what the pressure/flow situation is. Once I have an idea, then I can tell pretty quickly whether I can cover the entire property in 8 zones or whether it's going to be more like 12 zones. That's all I am looking for. And I give myself enough wiggle room in every bid to accommodate for change after we begin.

AI Inc
07-30-2008, 06:04 PM
Agreed. But if you're giving an estimate and just trying to get an IDEA of whether they have a lot of pressure or low pressure - a lot of flow or low flow - what else are you going to do??? Dig a hole and cut into their water main and hook up a pressure/flow tester there????? Come on.

Hooking up to a hose bib is often the only thing that is practical - at least until you actually get the job and tie into the water main.

It also gives you a couple quick answers. Can I even do a system here.
Is the water awesome , medicore poor.ect.

Mike Leary
07-30-2008, 06:13 PM
It also gives you a couple quick answers. Can I even do a system here.
Is the water awesome , medicore poor.ect.

That is the bottom line, we've re-built many under-zoned systems.

5.0
07-30-2008, 06:23 PM
Cool, I had envisioned something like greenmonster or jimlewis' setup.
Not looking for anything ultra-accurate, just a little more professional looking...
How did I know Leary would have the the mack daddy setup... :laugh: :drinkup:

Mike Leary
07-30-2008, 06:42 PM
How did I know Leary would have the the mack daddy setup... :laugh: :drinkup:

My partner went even one step up...got a logging psi gage that measured
pressure in a 24 hour period. Downloaded, it gave the optimum time to
irrigate when pressures were higher. :clapping::drinkup:

Mike Leary
07-30-2008, 06:56 PM
I'm rebuilding my own as well. Will post some pics once all the parts are in.

Will we be able to go to your site and monitor pressure and flow per zone, per client, in real time?

JimLewis
07-30-2008, 09:33 PM
You know, if you really want to get a pretty good idea of what the real pressure and flow are just behind the water meter - just call the water purveyor. I don't usually take the time to do that because it means sitting on hold for 10-15 minutes in my truck until I finally find the right person. But it is a good way of finding out. Every time I've tried it, I've been able to reach someone at the customer's water purveyor's office who was able to tell me pretty close to exactly what the pressure and flow should be right behind the water meter.

I've even thought of having my office manager do this leg work for me before I ever get to the site, that way I don't even have to do a test.

Mike Leary
07-30-2008, 10:04 PM
You know, if you really want to get a pretty good idea of what the real pressure and flow are just behind the water meter - just call the water purveyor.

I trust myself.

Waterit
07-30-2008, 11:25 PM
You know, if you really want to get a pretty good idea of what the real pressure and flow are just behind the water meter - just call the water purveyor.

Our water purveyor will only tell you that they guarantee 40PSI at the meter at any point in their system, and that volume depends on meter size, meter service line size, and water main size. Duh.

I use a glycerine gauge mounted on a 3/4 T with a hose adapter at one end and a ball valve at the other. Except for when I run into a frostproof faucet, which in FL is rare anyway, I'm good to go to read the static pressure.

Experience tells me that I'll get 12-15 GPM from a 3/4 meter and 20+/- from a 1", which are the usual sizes for residentials here. Some commercials have a 1-1/2" meter, but that's as big as we get for irrigation.

I've had a couple of instances where we had to install jockey pumps to boost pressure.

Mike Leary
07-31-2008, 12:46 AM
Duh.

Ditto.........

Kiril
07-31-2008, 01:04 AM
Will we be able to go to your site and monitor pressure and flow per zone, per client, in real time?

Right on.....and I will also be installing all Calsense controllers so I can sit at my desk and monitor all my systems.

I always assume I have about 20% less flow and pressure than I get readings on, that way I am reasonably assured my designs will never be under zoned.

Mike Leary
07-31-2008, 01:17 AM
Right on.....and I will also be installing all Calsense controllers so I can sit at my desk and monitor all my systems.

I always assume I have about 20% less flow and pressure than I get readings on, that way I am reasonably assured my designs will never be under zoned.

Neat, that's why we look up to you so much and our learning curve increases.