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cwags73
07-29-2008, 07:23 AM
I have an employee that repeatedly doesn't wear a respirator when spraying Q4. He's always telling me it isn't required according to the label. My understanding is your supposed to wear one regardless of what your spraying. Am I wrong and how would you handle this employee? He's certified, very reliable, and hard working.

tamadrummer
07-29-2008, 07:32 AM
Q4 is a signal word "Caution", isn't it?

Unless required by you, if the label does not list it in the safety equipment needed, than he is right.

You can overrule the label because it is your company and you make the rules.

grassman177
07-29-2008, 03:01 PM
i agree, is not required by law

lawntennis
07-29-2008, 09:58 PM
Respirators do not do much for our image. We try to convince the public that what we are using is safe and then go out in rubber boots and glooves and a respirator.

Hissing Cobra
07-29-2008, 11:17 PM
According to the Q4 label, the applicator must wear a long sleeved shirt, pants, rubber gloves and boots (neoprene is best), socks, and safety glasses.

Though the label didn't state this, it's a very good idea to wear a Tyvek suit, safety glasses, respirator and rubber gloves when mixing the concentrate into his tanks. This will prevent him from inhaling the concentrated vapors or possibly swallowing some of the concentrate should he slip and fall with it in his hand.

When mixing the concentate, it's always best to take the most precautions and a respirator should be a requirement, although it's probably not needed when your spraying the diluted form of the product (customer's perceptions would KILL your business)!

grassman177
07-30-2008, 08:53 AM
yeah, good point although i dont personally go to those lengths. i have spilled concentrate on myself during mixing and i striped so fast it was not funny. hhhmmmmm. tyvec

Hissing Cobra
07-30-2008, 04:28 PM
Yeah, when I used to work for The Lawn Company of Cape Cod, we were required to wear respirators, goggles, Tyvek suits, Neoprene gloves, long sleeves, long pants and Neoprene boots when we were filling. If we were caught NOT using all of the aforementioned PPE (Personal Protection Equipment), we got docked on our bonuses. When spraying, we had to wear long sleeved shirts, pants, gloves and boots. Of course, we had some guys cheat but I was never one of them. I want to be on this planet for as long as I can.

By the way, you can purchase those Tyvek suits at any Lesco/John Deere Landscapes location. It's a good idea to buy them two sizes too big, that way you can slip them on right over your clothing and boots.

Pilgrims' Pride
07-30-2008, 08:31 PM
Yeah, when I used to work for The Lawn Company of Cape Cod, we were required to wear respirators, goggles, Tyvek suits, Neoprene gloves, long sleeves, long pants and Neoprene boots when we were filling. If we were caught NOT using all of the aforementioned PPE (Personal Protection Equipment), we got docked on our bonuses. When spraying, we had to wear long sleeved shirts, pants, gloves and boots. Of course, we had some guys cheat but I was never one of them. I want to be on this planet for as long as I can.

By the way, you can purchase those Tyvek suits at any Lesco/John Deere Landscapes location. It's a good idea to buy them two sizes too big, that way you can slip them on right over your clothing and boots.

That was a long time ago Cobra!
Did we ever work together?
Sagamore 1989/90?-93 then Weymouth til 97.

Do you sell tyvek pants only?

Hissing Cobra
07-30-2008, 09:03 PM
I never got to work with you. I worked there from April of 2001 until August of 2005. I fired them (not The Lawn Company but Scotts) because I couldn't deal with their way of work. The emphasis was to bill $1,100.00 per day whether it was pouring rain, snowing, freezing or whatever. Credit was not given for the amount of stops, square footage, service calls or anything else. It was "Bill, Bill, Bill" and don't come back until you've hit your goal.

It was unbelieveable the amount of pressure that we were put under and to make things worse, a lot of my co-workers were forced to do a lot of unethical things due to the "impossible to hit" billing goals (of course, I still did what I always did and rarely hit my billing goals, thus never really getting bonus money.) However, my customers were happy and the quality of my work didn't go down. I became the guy that "you'd want to work on your own lawn if you couldn't do it yourself". When Saturdays became mandatory during the hot summer months until 5:00 pm, I decided that I'd better start looking for another job. Working for Scotts was like having a terminal illness (I don't mean to offend anyone who has suffered from or has known someone who's suffered from a terminal illness).

I then found my job at Lesco/JDL and couldn't be happier. I now only work 40 hours per week and don't have to get shortchanged by Scotts and their 55 hour workweek with 15 hours being "Chinese Overtime". I've gained my life back and my whole attitude toward family time and free time has changed dramatically.

As for the Tyvek suits, we only sell the entire suit and don't carry the pants and tops separately.

ICT Bill
07-30-2008, 09:32 PM
Hissing, great story. leverage in the wrong direction is ....well......wrong. nice change I'll bet the fam is much happier, all of them. good for you

greendoctor
07-31-2008, 04:16 AM
Respirators do not do much for our image. We try to convince the public that what we are using is safe and then go out in rubber boots and glooves and a respirator.

I do wear rubber boots and gloves when applying. I will use a respirator for tree and shrub work due to what I am usually spraying and how I am spraying it. Avid or Talstar can be extremely toxic if inhaled. I am not applying this through a low pressure hand sprayer. There is a big difference between 20 PSI and 400 PSI. I get the coverage and product efficacy that the "landscapers" and their hand sprayers do not get. But there is the generation of what is known as respirable particles in the immediate area. A flat fan nozzle operating at 25PSI, 50 GPA, 16 inches above the ground should not be generating respirable particles. My other reason for not liking 5 or 10 GPA lawn applications. On the other hand, disc-core nozzles running 1-2 GPM at 400 PSI will create a forceful, but finely atomized spray. Mixing and loading in an enclosed shop or warehouse with poor ventilation is another place where respiratory exposure is highly likely. I only mix and load in open air, with any wind to my back.