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nobagger
08-01-2008, 05:37 PM
One of my employees has broke or damaged 2-3 pieces of equipment this year (so far) he is a great kid who picked things up very quickly but is rather hard on some of the equipment. First he ripped a recoil out of a 21" mower, second he ripped a recoil out of a backpack blower that just had a new recoil installed last fall and today he called to tell me he ran the Z turn into the side of the trailer coming down a hill. Sure enough there is a 6-8" long tare in the side of it and he also bent up some of the frame under the aluminum sheeting. Again he is a good kid and does decent work BUT recently I've had to tell him a few times to slow down so my guess is that he wasnt "creeping down the hill"

lawnwizards
08-01-2008, 05:44 PM
the recoils are easy fixes so i wouldnt dock his pay for those. but messing mower up will probably cost some change so i'd dock his pay a percentage until its paid off or atleast hold him partially responsible. goodluck.

nobagger
08-01-2008, 05:47 PM
the recoils are easy fixes so i wouldnt dock his pay for those. but messing mower up will probably cost some change so i'd dock his pay a percentage until its paid off or atleast hold him partially responsible. goodluck.

Well I have yet to see the mower. But every one knows these enclosed trailers are built with the lightest materials known to man except the frames. Hopefully there is no damage, he said there wasnt but we'll see when they get back!

nobagger
08-01-2008, 06:34 PM
No other opinions...? thats rare!

Phil G
08-01-2008, 06:53 PM
No other opinions...? thats rare!


Yer, kick his arse and put it down to impetuous youth (his, not yours) :)


atb Phil

ponyboy
08-01-2008, 10:06 PM
if it is the same breakage then something should be done may bee make him pay foe the repair but diff thind maybee he is not that good. however 2 things talk to him tell him faster is not always better, machines are expensive be carefull and so on in your case just talk to him and say next starter is on you and the machine be easy on her and take your time

topsites
08-01-2008, 10:16 PM
I'm about about accountability when:

1. It's done on purpose or through neglect, rushing counts although in a
worker's mind they're as likely thinking they're being productive.

2. Have been told about the situation and suggestions for change have been made.

Maybe one way to say it is look, by you rushing it costs me more money than extra you're bringing in.
I don't want to see no more accidents, now SLOW it DOWN.

JNyz
08-01-2008, 10:39 PM
take it out of his pay and he will learn quick

capetrees
08-01-2008, 10:46 PM
If he's your employee, you have to eat the costs, bottom line. You can repremand him and give him the "junk jobs" but as far as docking his pay, you're legally not allowed to. If he were a private self employed contractor who was using your tools on a job, then you could dock his pay if you were paying his wages. Rack it up to live and learn for both of you. I used to smash all kinds of tools for a guy when I first started. 20 years later, he can't do without me. Literally. He's layed up right now in the hospital and I'm running his biz till he's back. Don't lose a good thing over a few fixable tools and parts. You can replace the tools and parts but probably not him.

Backhoe Man
08-01-2008, 11:44 PM
This is a joke ? right? No you cannot take it out of his pay unless you can show he did it intentional. Welcome to have your own business. Brian///////

Dakota476
08-02-2008, 12:03 AM
not sure about PA but here in jersey it is a disorderly persons offense to with hold any portion of an employees pay. so even if he quits and owes you money you can't hold his pay... LEGALLY

DuallyVette
08-02-2008, 12:32 AM
One of my employees has broke or damaged 2-3 pieces of equipment this year (so far) he is a great kid who picked things up very quickly but is rather hard on some of the equipment. First he ripped a recoil out of a 21" mower, second he ripped a recoil out of a backpack blower that just had a new recoil installed last fall and today he called to tell me he ran the Z turn into the side of the trailer coming down a hill. Sure enough there is a 6-8" long tare in the side of it and he also bent up some of the frame under the aluminum sheeting. Again he is a good kid and does decent work BUT recently I've had to tell him a few times to slow down so my guess is that he wasnt "creeping down the hill"

As for " ripping recoils", You need to show him the proper way to start a piece of equipment. (1) pull the rope in the proper direction. (2) point out that puling the starter rope is not a test of strength, or an opportunity to show off how long your arm is.

As for going down a hill too fast and running into the trailer: NEVER park at the bottom of a hill that you are mowing. We always park across the street, or beside a neighbors house. We keep our curb clear so that we can turn around on the pavement(sometimes) and blow the curb off without a truck to blow around. Depending how steep the hill is, its VERY EASY for a mower to get away from you. On a less steep hill, you can easily get too confident and have an accident.

Fred B
08-02-2008, 01:27 AM
What you can do is give him a written warning so that is documented. And reduce his wage by $1.00 an hour and as a bonus if no more equipment damage he gets a dollar an hour bonus at the end of each month. If things improve great if not a dollar an hour is going to repairs.

capetrees
08-03-2008, 11:57 AM
Again FredB, you can't hold any money from an employee for damages to equipment owned by the employer. That's part of the world of having employees. If you were a contractor hiring other subs to do the work and by chance they broke a piece of equipment your own, then something could be done. The employers problems however, are in the idea that he didn't train the employee well. If the employee continues this trend, the employer can fire him but not withhold wages. Maybe next round of raises for the crew could be held back because he didn't earn it but the employer can't reduce the wages either. :nono:

HOOLIE
08-03-2008, 01:37 PM
When I worked for another LCO, we came up with official work orders the guys had to fill out to get any piece of equipment fixed. Pretty soon we started (after the repairs) listing how much each part cost, plus the cost of our mechanic's labor to do the repair.

It didn't work on some guys, but when you could show them just how much money these 'incidents' cost the company, some of them began to pay attention.

It was also good for tracking how much each piece of equipment was costing us in repairs each year, and whether or not we should junk it and replace it.

Fred B
08-03-2008, 01:54 PM
Captrees,

I am not withholding money from the employees. If they were originaly hired at lets say at $15per hour due to whatever experiance they had. With a documented written warning you can lower their wage, not withholding but actually lowering pay rate. Now as an incentive or bonus you can offer them a dollar a hour or more, if you want to for time that equipment is not damaged. If they damage equipment due to neglect they do not get that bonus for that time period.And you are right it is illegal to withhold money from employees for damaged equipment unless you can prove gross negligence

CkLandscapingOrlando
08-03-2008, 09:04 PM
I agree.In Florida it seems to be a common practice to dock pay but it aint right.At the same time there has to be something done so lower his pay,fire him,or maybe make him do the repairs him self.You'll probly have watch over his work but he'll learn two fold and you'll gain a much stronger guy.One who can fix your stuff.Plus every ones happy in the end.I would'nt let him touch the trailer though..

TomberLawn
08-04-2008, 01:12 AM
I like Fred B's idea. You get the same effect of docking him, but this is a legal way to do it. The key is to document everything. I interviewed a human resource officer for a large restaurant chain last year for a college project. He said the best advice he can give any employer is documentation, documentation, documentation. Keep records of everything he does so it forms a habit or at least represents a trend. Then, in writing, let the employee know that his work behavior warrants a decrease in wages until he proves his experience. That will get his attention and he'll actually learn how to use the equipment properly. Just be glad it was your trailer he ran into and not a customer's car--but take action now so that it doesn't happen to a customer's car or building.