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View Full Version : How would you all light this (PIC)?


CAPT Stream Rotar
08-03-2008, 11:34 AM
Hi, I'm Eddie an irrigation guy that has done some LL in the past. I have serviced, and installed it in the past. I noticed there are many similarities between the LL and irrigation...

Any how I was wondering how you all would light this up..

My sprinkler supple house does have a fair amount of lighting necessities. I am looking to spend some good dough..I would like room on the controller for doing other beds in the back as well as a few trees...My mother said she would like to light from the top down...

Thanks in advance for any help....

CSR, Eddie B.

CAPT Stream Rotar
08-03-2008, 12:08 PM
Whoops sorry guys!!!

http://i116.photobucket.com/albums/o16/windoraphan/pergola.jpg

Mark B
08-03-2008, 12:56 PM
Well well cappy over here on the bright side You think it is bad over there, well they are just as bad over here.

CAPT Stream Rotar
08-03-2008, 01:09 PM
information HORDERS!!!!!!!!!!!

S&MLL
08-03-2008, 03:18 PM
What do you want to light up? Do you plan on downlighting from the tree?

NightScenes
08-03-2008, 03:44 PM
In one hour(11:08am to 12:09pm), on a Sunday morning we became information HORDERS!!!!!!!! I wonder how many actually saw your pic in the whole hour that it was up before we were called HORDERS. We don't even know what you are wanting to do here.

Good luck getting any info now.

Mark B
08-03-2008, 04:28 PM
Told you they were bad over here. What was you wanting to light up? Give some ideas of what you had in mind. There are some great CLOs in this forum.

CAPT Stream Rotar
08-03-2008, 04:33 PM
sh-thinking about lighting up the pergola...

any down light suggestions?
and also any controller ideas?

Tomwilllight
08-03-2008, 04:39 PM
Hi, I'm Eddie an irrigation guy that has done some LL in the past. I have serviced, and installed it in the past. I noticed there are many similarities between the LL and irrigation...


Eddie,

I'm curious... what exactly are the similarities between lighting and irrigation?

As for your project, there's not nearly enough information in your photo to even make a guess.

Nor is there any information about what your client wants to do when the light is on. I also like to know how great are the client's security needs, the age of the people who will use the space at night and how much the client is able to pay?

Better yet, contact me, set up a meeting and I'll be happy to come out and provide you a complete design. Of course there'll be a fee with a deposit to start and all expenses paid.

Tom

Litewerks Expert Lighting
08-03-2008, 05:00 PM
one deck light on each pillar at the top, on the inside, you can drill up and out of the top to hide the wire. then you will only have to bring them down in one place. i will try to get some pics on here as i just did one like that. turned out very well, customer loved. I think that is what you are after??? in any case good luck.

-Dustin

Chris J
08-03-2008, 06:35 PM
Tom, you must be hurting for business as well. This is the first time I've seen you solicit work in this fashion. Well, more power to ya my suspender wearing brother. When times get tough, we all have to reach out across the nation for whatever we can get. Although, I don't think this OP could afford the expense. But as a matter of good faith, I'll be offering up some opinions as soon as he tells us a bit more about the project, and what it is that he's trying to achieve.

Chris J
08-03-2008, 09:01 PM
Told you they were bad over here. What was you wanting to light up? Give some ideas of what you had in mind. There are some great CLOs in this forum.

:laugh: CLO (Chief Luminary Officer) I resemble that remark, so stop it. I stole the initials from one of my collegues, but now I have a patent on it. If I catch you using it, I'll sue!

TXNSLighting
08-03-2008, 09:06 PM
:laugh: CLO (Chief Luminary Officer) I resemble that remark, so stop it. I stole the initials from one of my collegues, but now I have a patent on it. If I catch you using it, I'll sue!

Ha you get em chris!

Mark B
08-03-2008, 09:12 PM
I had to put that up there, thought you would like that. What did you do go back and reread that thread.

I even stole that from you on my biz cards (Thanks BTW). Hope you didn't mind. LOL

irrig8r
08-03-2008, 09:31 PM
Hey Eddie, good to see you over here....

I would light up and down on those arbor posts... personally I like something compact llike the copper Nightscaping Tuliter (http://www.nightscaping.com/linedrwpdfs/tuliter.pdf).


http://www.nighteffects.com/nightscaping/tulitera.jpg



They redesigned it last year for easier lamp (bulb) replacements. I place them at about 5 to 6 feet off the ground... depends on whether you're gonna catch any glare from below when sitting nearby...

Vista makes something similar that's more square looking in a powder coated aluminum if you prefer that look.

It's a wedge base halogen lamp available in different wattages for whatever brightness level you need...

If you just want to light from the top and want to be able to aim in different directions, then I like the FX TS-20, and similar fixtures from Vista.

http://www.fxl.com/products/images/products/images/12155579775009864.jpg

irrig8r
08-03-2008, 09:37 PM
I hate the way Lawnsite duplicates posts when I go to edit them too quickly...oh well....


Oh, and Eddie... we don't call em "controllers"... they are transformers and then whatever switching options you want to add...

However, with an Irritrol PC Control you can run your folks' lighting transformers AND sprinklers... from their PC.

Chris J
08-03-2008, 11:24 PM
Gregg. and Eddie!

Before you go and get all defensive, I just want to say "I'm just kidding".

irrig8r
08-04-2008, 12:46 AM
Gregg. and Eddie!

Before you go and get all defensive, I just want to say "I'm just kidding".

Eddie seems like a decent guy and a quick learner.... and he cracks me up over in the irrigation forum...
and no, I'm not going to get defensive Chris... you seem like a decent guy too.

Bartender... double shots of Kumbaya for everybody!

And BTW, today was Jerry Day (http://www.jerryday.org/) in San Francisco... so don't go harshin' my mellow...

http://img.timeinc.net/Life/1995/garcia.jpg

Tomwilllight
08-04-2008, 09:52 AM
My apologies to all...

Captain Eddie's breezy reference to the similarities between irrigation and lighting got under my skin.

I'm a lighting designer first. As a lighting designer I've spent much of my life refining my abilities as an artist in this most ephemeral of all the arts.

The installation of a well-designed irrigation system is also the result of many years of study, experience and a commitment to quality. It is a completely honorable and rewarding trade. As I see it, the essintial difference between irrigation and lighting is that irrigation does not aspire to be an art, while lighting may.

I certainly could be wrong in specific examples, but I don't think many clients buy irrigation so they may invite their friends to join them on their patios in the evening, with appropriate beverages in their hands, to watch the sprinklers do their work on their gardens.

I'm not demeaning irrigation, I'm pointing out some differences between it and landscape lighting.

Clearly many of the installation issues in both irrigation and landscape lighting are similar in some details. And a quality installation is essential for the proper functioning of both. I respect those who make a good installations that are stable and reward their clients with years of trouble-free service. I know from a decade of personal experience specifically with landscape lighting how difficult it is to do installation well.

I've noted how commited the participants of this forum are to helping others and to improving their own results. I deeply respect your efforts.

My own goal in participating in this forum is to offer my experience and insight on design issues, to learn from your experience with installation and to enjoy the company of individuals engaged in businesses similar to mine.

Tom

Chris, you're right, my business is down considerably. My hedge fund managers aren't calling me this summer; I think they're watching the market not their gardens this year. It won't be my best year, nor will it be my worst and that is the truth.

David Gretzmier
08-04-2008, 04:00 PM
I believe that lighting can be an art, but it takes more time to do so. as I learn that art, I am discovering a customers willingness to pay for that to be directly related to thier understanding of the effect I am trying to achieve.

I have to admit, when I did more irrigation, I remember the first time I saw toro multi stram rotors in motion at a sunrise where I was working on a jobsite. they were also hooked to a pumping sysytem that had a rythmic pulse to the pressure, so as they rotated the arc would increase and decrease by 30% or so. seeing ten or so of those heads in pulsing and circular motion across a morning fog at an orangy-red sunrise, over a nearly weed-free dark green tifgreen bermuda grass, I'm sorry, that was art. The homeowner came up to me as I stood transfixed, and he made the comment it was his favorite place to be during the day on his back porch. I had to agree. After that all I installed were toro multi streams, until my supplier quit carrying them.

Hunter pgp's may provide a more consistant precipitation rate, but toro multistream rotors were beautiful to watch.

CAPT Stream Rotar
08-04-2008, 04:12 PM
thanks for the great responses...

ED

a special shoutout to Gregg from San Jose! steal your face brotha

Tomwilllight
08-04-2008, 04:24 PM
I certainly could be wrong in specific examples, but I don't think many clients buy irrigation so they may invite their friends to join them on their patios in the evening,

David,

When I wrote the above, I was specifically thinking about an irrigation contractor I know in CT and a discussion we had once. Water can certainly be art as the Belagio Fountain proves; it is, it that application, a form of sculpture.

Tom

ccfree
08-04-2008, 10:28 PM
My apologies to all...

Captain Eddie's breezy reference to the similarities between irrigation and lighting got under my skin.

I'm a lighting designer first. As a lighting designer I've spent much of my life refining my abilities as an artist in this most ephemeral of all the arts.

The installation of a well-designed irrigation system is also the result of many years of study, experience and a commitment to quality. It is a completely honorable and rewarding trade. As I see it, the essintial difference between irrigation and lighting is that irrigation does not aspire to be an art, while lighting may.

I certainly could be wrong in specific examples, but I don't think many clients buy irrigation so they may invite their friends to join them on their patios in the evening, with appropriate beverages in their hands, to watch the sprinklers do their work on their gardens.

I'm not demeaning irrigation, I'm pointing out some differences between it and landscape lighting.

Clearly many of the installation issues in both irrigation and landscape lighting are similar in some details. And a quality installation is essential for the proper functioning of both. I respect those who make a good installations that are stable and reward their clients with years of trouble-free service. I know from a decade of personal experience specifically with landscape lighting how difficult it is to do installation well.

I've noted how commited the participants of this forum are to helping others and to improving their own results. I deeply respect your efforts.

My own goal in participating in this forum is to offer my experience and insight on design issues, to learn from your experience with installation and to enjoy the company of individuals engaged in businesses similar to mine.

Tom

Chris, you're right, my business is down considerably. My hedge fund managers aren't calling me this summer; I think they're watching the market not their gardens this year. It won't be my best year, nor will it be my worst and that is the truth.

Nice statement Tom. Could not of stated it better since my passion is lighting and I also have a license to do irrigation in the state of TX. Lots of satisfaction from creating art.

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-08-2008, 07:58 AM
Pit Bulls meet the Rottweilers

Good luck Eddie

FYI I looked into LL and even took some classes. Decided to focus purely on irrigation. Decided it is better to be a master at one trade than trying to be a jack of all trades. As if irrigation service vehicles don't get cluttered enough try putting LL wiring and lights in with it. Plus talking about lighting effects with women gets to be a beating.

TPnTX
08-08-2008, 06:24 PM
"but I don't think many clients buy irrigation so they may invite their friends to join them on their patios in the evening, with appropriate beverages in their hands, to watch the sprinklers do their work on their gardens"

well arranged statement similar to something I've been saying as well. When the customer is smiling as the write they check. You don't see that in irrigation and not that often in landscape(with no lighting)

the only binding similarity between irrigation and LV isnt the artistic side at all. Its all about pressure and voltage drop being somewhat similar making it very easy to grasp by a person who otherwise would have no appitite for learning anything involving the electrical trade.

We did however just do a large irrigation job using MP rotors. That customer was smiling or at least entertained.

Chris J
08-08-2008, 06:50 PM
I know that it brought tears to my eyes when I got my irrigation system put in (no bs). Not really for the "pipes and water" but simply because the company that did it for me had great respect for me. The company I hired is also into lighting, so I actually gave my competitor money (go figure). They are a good company, and I know the owner well. He sent his best people out to do the job with specific instructions to give me anything I wanted (extra spigots, valves, etc.) When all was said and done, I really enjoyed the feeling I got watching those sprinkler heads rotate. I would give the nod to irrigators as having the ability to create art. I look at it every time it turns on, and I love it.

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-09-2008, 07:24 AM
I believe that lighting can be an art, but it takes more time to do so. as I learn that art, I am discovering a customers willingness to pay for that to be directly related to thier understanding of the effect I am trying to achieve.

I have to admit, when I did more irrigation, I remember the first time I saw toro multi stram rotors in motion at a sunrise where I was working on a jobsite. they were also hooked to a pumping sysytem that had a rythmic pulse to the pressure, so as they rotated the arc would increase and decrease by 30% or so. seeing ten or so of those heads in pulsing and circular motion across a morning fog at an orangy-red sunrise, over a nearly weed-free dark green tifgreen bermuda grass, I'm sorry, that was art. The homeowner came up to me as I stood transfixed, and he made the comment it was his favorite place to be during the day on his back porch. I had to agree. After that all I installed were toro multi streams, until my supplier quit carrying them.

Hunter pgp's may provide a more consistant precipitation rate, but toro multistream rotors were beautiful to watch.

You would find some willing allies on the irrigation forum. Leary and I are big fans of the SR. All I installed for the first 10 years of my career. One reason I enjoy the MPs. At sunup or sundown. Nothing like a stream rotor in the days first or final glare.