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Cagey
08-05-2008, 04:15 PM
I would like to ask for some professional input from those that use your mowers daily for hundred of hours each year. I am a homeowner and am looking to replace a 20-year old Honda 21 inch mower that I purchased new. I started out by looking at another Honda, but the dealer steered me away from them since he did not consider the new Honda engines to be anywhere near the quality of the HR215 that I have. That opened up all possibilities then, so I started looking a little larger mower to cut my mowing time. I mow about a half an acre, with only two trees and the yard is fairly flat. I started out by considering a eXmark Metro 32” with a 15 hp Kawasaki, I am also considering a Toro 32” T-bar fixed deck mower with the same 15hp Kawasaki. On another forum, it was suggested that I look at the BOP Quick 32 Ninja with a 15 hp Kawasaki. While I know that a 36” machine is not much larger than a 32” one, I am concerned that I will not be able to fit a 36-inch machine in the garage with 2 cars.

My questions are as follows.

1. Are BOP mowers a good high quality machine?

2. Would any of you that own them expect a homeowner like myself to not get 20 years of usage out of a BOP machine?

3. Since my wife and my 6 kids will be using the machine (as they get old enough) do you believe anyone of the machines I suggested has and advantage over the other; i.e.: which one would be easier for one of the girls to steer? Yes, I have heard all the comment concerning 6 girls.

4. If you can share any other pro/con concerning one of the machines, I would be greatly appreciative.

I thank you for your input in advance for all of your input. Take care and have a great day.

Cagey

ixlr8
08-05-2008, 04:31 PM
I purchased a Husqvarna 48" walk behind for my residence. It was just over 1 acre, very steep hills, lots of stuff to mow around.. so a rider was out. It has served me well, it is a belt driven unit, in hilly conditions with lots of maneuvering, I would suspect it is not for the ladies. It is a bit much to wrestle around. Flat level ground, they could probably handle it. On the belt drive machines... reverse is more like a sort of assist, not much help. I wish I had gotten a hydro drive... but my dealer wouldn't sell me one since I didn't have any experience with maneuvering a walk behind. With the hydro... what you tell it to do... consider it done, the belt drive is apparently more forgiving of mistakes. It is 8 years old, Kawasaki 14hp engine, all I have done to it is; put gas in it, sharpen the blades, change the oil, grease the fittings, and this spring changed the belts as I thought it was a good thing to do after 8 years. It is too big for my garage... I got a 10'x14' shed to put it and other gardening stuff in and keep the mess out of the garage. HTH

DA Quality Lawn & YS
08-05-2008, 05:25 PM
Cagey - I have the BOP Quick 36 Ninja with the 15HP Kaw. LOVE IT.

Use it commercially 10-15 hours per week. Cuts excellent, VERY NICE STRIPING.
For the hours use you have to use it each week, it should very well go 20 years with that Kaw engine. I would recommend the 15HP Kaw Ninja model vs the 16HP Kaw Samurai, you don't need electric start as a homeowner and the pull start on mine is pretty easy.

One reason I might steer you away from the Quick, however, is dealer support and maint. BOP does do an excellent job with owner support, but as a homeowner you may want that 'hometown' dealer to have a relationship with. If you try to take your Quick to someone local to fix, you probably will not get any priority at all, especially over the commercial guys that bring machines in all the time (that they may have purchased there). That is, if the Quick even needs any fixing beyond what you can do yourself (which is a lot if you know very basic mechanics.)

Cagey
08-05-2008, 06:02 PM
Ixlr8:

Thanks for the input. I do need a machine that will fit in the garage with all the other stuff, since sheds are not allowed in the neighborhood.

DA Quality Lawn & YS:

Thanks for the input. I am fairly mechanically inclined, so I believe I can handle most of the mechanical issues that might come up. As long as the Kawasaki authorized dealer will repair the engine if it should break, I believe that would be fine.

I was actually looking at the Ninja versus the Samarai, since I do not believe I need electric start. Plus it is another thing to go wrong with the mower. Do you believe the girls would be able to steer the Ninja around the yard? Also, do you know if the Ninja is easier to steer verses the other mowers that I mentioned?

Thank you

Cagey

DA Quality Lawn & YS
08-05-2008, 06:54 PM
Cagey - as far as support for the Kaw engine, give BOP a call (ph # on their website) and ask them that question, they are happy to answer questions.

When you refer to the 'girls' using it around your yard, I am assuming you are referring to your daughters?? The Quick machine is a single hydro which means that you still have to manually turn the machine at the end of a pass. Once you get on to it (throwing your body weight a bit to swing it around), it is a snap. However, it should be used by adults or near that age, someone around, say, 15 may have trouble turning the machine (even though it is lightweight and compact, it isn't as lightweight as a 21" mower:) It is a commercial machine and is built to last.

joed
08-05-2008, 07:11 PM
The Gravely 1034 might be a good choice for you. It just came out this year. I've attached two photos and a web link. They are priced attractively. Here in the Toronto, Ontario, Canada area, they are about $1600. Most likely, they are cheaper in the U.S. Although not as good as a true commercial unit like the Exmark or Toro 32", it might serve you well. A few landscapers bought them in April and have used them for commercial use and they seem to be happy with them.

http://www.gravely.com/products/walkbehind/waw/

mowerbrad
08-05-2008, 08:01 PM
Alot of people seem to really like the BOP mowers. I have never used them but I prefer to buy my mowers from a local dealer. That way there is always someone who will fix your equipment and do any and all warrenty work on it. It really helps to have a good relationship with a local dealer, that way if you need something they will be more than willing to help you out.

freedm2
08-05-2008, 08:18 PM
Alot of people seem to really like the BOP mowers. I have never used them but I prefer to buy my mowers from a local dealer. That way there is always someone who will fix your equipment and do any and all warrenty work on it. It really helps to have a good relationship with a local dealer, that way if you need something they will be more than willing to help you out.


I don't understand why everyone is so concerned about dealer service. There is nothing to these machines. If you can't bolt on a new pump / wheel motor.... Now would I try to rebuild a pump.. No, but the dealer probably won't either. Too labor intensive. I get dealer service during the warranty period but that's it..

FYI - the Quick 32 is longer than the Quick 36. Might as well get the 36 for a 4" gain in width.

topsites
08-05-2008, 09:48 PM
I don't think you are ready for a commercial Walk-behind mower,
it ain't no wheeled trimmer like that 21" you're used to.

Certainly I wouldn't even consider letting anyone under 18 get behind any
of my grand toros, that thing will crush your bones and probably I did just
overbear some on this here melodramatic opportunity but these machines
either get the respect they deserve or they will pound it into the first
bright-eyed bushy tailed noob, however you like.

And sure it's not as dangerous as a brush chipper, but still, watch out LOL

That having been said, yes it will last 20 years but there are more than
a few differences between a commercial Wb and some puny 21" toy.

Because that's what a 21" is to me, a puny POS toy.
Commercial machines also require constant maintenance, I do mine daily,
you'll need a grease gun for starters but what you're thinking of is not
unheard of and it can be done, it is not only quite plausible but if approached
properly can give many years of great second-to-none service, so good luck.

If you do buy one, if you think I did overbear then give it a chance because I think
once you get a bit of a ways down the road with it you might agree with me, they
are in a category completely apart from anything you have ever experienced.

I might recommend renting one for a day, they do cost about $100 to rent but more than
a few of these rental places do rent them, that you could do for one cut just to see if this
is something you might want to get into.

Peace out.

lifetree
08-05-2008, 09:48 PM
... The Quick machine is a single hydro which means that you still have to manually turn the machine at the end of a pass. Once you get on to it (throwing your body weight a bit to swing it around), it is a snap. However, it should be used by adults or near that age, someone around, say, 15 may have trouble turning the machine (even though it is lightweight and compact, it isn't as lightweight as a 21" mower:) It is a commercial machine and is built to last.

I agree with this assessment ... the Quick 36 is a good commercial machine and will last you for 20 years if you're only going to do your yard with it !! Get a Quick machine, you won't regret it.

CAT powered
08-05-2008, 11:45 PM
Topsite your Toros must be different than my old Bobcat. I've got an old belt driven 48" Bobcat mower and my 15 year old son mows with it every week and does a great job with it. It definitely isn't for someone with limited upper-body strength though. I've been using this Bobcat for the past 10 years on just my house after I gave up doing the few cemeteries I used to mow and I've had to replace a gearbox and the belts and that's it.

Cagey
08-06-2008, 12:43 AM
DA Quality Lawn & YS:

BOP told me that any Kawasaki dealer could repair the engine on the mower. Tommy told me he has only had one Quick owner that called to complain that the Kawasaki authorized repair dealer would not repair his engine under warranty. Tommy called Kawasaki, and Kawasaki spoke with the dealer who supposedly had the engine repaired and running within 2 hours.

Yes, I was thinking that as my daughters grew older (15 or 16 and up) that they might be able to use the mower to cut the grass when I cannot do it for some reason. Plus, my wife at times like to mow the yard, so she can get away from everything for about an hour. I would just like to know what you think about a 120-pound lady being able to steer the mower.

Joed:

I will have to check out the Gravely. I know that there is one dealer in my area, but I think he is the only one. I will have to see if he has sold any and wait to hear on this site if others like/use them. Though come to think about it when I stopped by the dealership he did have a smaller Gravely that he said he would not recommend to a friend much less me until he knew for certain that it had proven itself with the commercial mowers. This may be the machine he was talking about. I will have to check with him about it.

Mowerbrad:

I would like to have a local dealer, but truly believe the mower would rarely if ever see the shop unless I had a major issue. I would say that my Honda had been to the shop no more than 3 times over 20 years. I can normally take apart and repair my vehicles and other toys myself. Except for my eXmark dealer, the local dealers have tended to push me towards a larger and more expensive machine when I visited the shops to see what they were selling. The Wright Stander seemed like overkill for me and my yard when it was suggested at the dealership.

Freedm2:

I did not notice that fact. I will have to compare the Quick 32 verses the Quick 36. By the way do you own a Quick mower? If so, how long have you owned it? Plus, have you had any problems with it? Lastly, how hard is it to steer around the yard? Would it be comparable to a Toro 36 inch T-bar mower that my neighbors lawn service guy said I could try mowing my yard with this week?

Topsites:

Thanks for you confidence. I would hope that could learn to easily steer a 400-pound mower, since my employer entrusts me weekly to transport hundreds of folks across this county where a crash could easily cost my company in excess of 1 billion dollars. I have at least two grease guns, and as Spicoli said in “Fast Times at Ridgemont High,” I have an “awesome tool set.”

While I would not expect my daughters to use the mower all that often, I want for all of them to feel confident that they can take on and overcome any obstacle or challenge that life my bring to them. Raising them any differently is a failure in my opinion. Just like they should know how to use and behave around fire arms, I want them to know how to change their vehicles oil and mow their own yards.

Lifetree:

Have you had any MX issues with your Quick machines? Also, have you found anything that you do not like about the Quick 36 that you own? How would you compare it to a Toro belt drive walk behind? Would it be easier or harder to use than the Toro?

Cat powered:

Would you recommend the Toro over the Quick? If so, please explain why? While I tend to believe that all of these mowers that I have asked about and even those that have been suggested are high quality machines, I would like to know as much as I can about them before I plunk down close to 3 thousand dollars for one of them.

Thanks again for answering my questions. I apologize for asking so many follow-up questions, but I would like to ensure that I get a high quality mower that will last a long time, but more importantly one that I will enjoy mowing the yard with.

Cagey.

Hawg City Lawns
08-06-2008, 01:08 AM
well im going to have to agree with topsites just stop and think about the differences in these mowers 100 pound 21" or a 450 pound 36" yeah taking a 21" and slapping it on the tool bench to toy around with is no prob but doubt thats going to happen on a commercial walkbehind

DA Quality Lawn & YS
08-06-2008, 01:28 AM
"While I would not expect my daughters to use the mower all that often, I want for all of them to feel confident that they can take on and overcome any obstacle or challenge that life my bring to them. Raising them any differently is a failure in my opinion. Just like they should know how to use and behave around fire arms, I want them to know how to change their vehicles oil and mow their own yards."


Glad to hear you are raising children capable of taking things on....
Need more parents and kids like you. Best of luck whatever decision you should make.

DA