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View Full Version : What are your Annual Revenues Hardscaping


TreePro
08-07-2008, 12:54 PM
I am currently in the landscape business and am interested in getting into hardscaping as well. I was curious as to what everyone is doing in volume (revenue wise) and with how many men and equipment ($ wise in equipment).

Also, I am thinking if I get into it I will more than likely hire a certified Landscape Architect to takeover all landscape operations with a strong focus upon growing the hardscape operations. I was wanting to get some of your opinions and thoughts.

By the way, I have done extensive research and have a FULL business plan drafted already. Doesn't mean it is complete, but I have a DRAFT. Also, I have done the research and believe there is a market and demand for me to enter and be competitive.

Thanks for everyone's input ahead of time.

hickslawns
08-08-2008, 03:49 AM
Not being a jerk, but what does it matter. Sounds like you have your answer. If there is a market in your area for this work then go for it. It doesn't matter what everyone else is doing. Even if you start small and grow into what you are comfortable with and can make a profit, then you are rolling. Revenue will increase if you do the jobs nice. Good luck.

Stillwater
08-08-2008, 04:27 AM
I am currently in the landscape business and am interested in getting into hardscaping as well. I was curious as to what everyone is doing in volume (revenue wise) and with how many men and equipment ($ wise in equipment).

Also, I am thinking if I get into it I will more than likely hire a certified Landscape Architect to takeover all landscape operations with a strong focus upon growing the hardscape operations. I was wanting to get some of your opinions and thoughts.

By the way, I have done extensive research and have a FULL business plan drafted already. Doesn't mean it is complete, but I have a DRAFT. Also, I have done the research and believe there is a market and demand for me to enter and be competitive.

Thanks for everyone's input ahead of time.

No ligit operation will disclose their income/numbers so price out a few hypothetical jobs with the research you have completed, you will then see your numbers.

What is your position in this operation?... Having a CLA on staff is great but it is only my opinion hear that they should not have a strong focus on growing anything but marketable landscape plans.

Take your income needs/goals section from your business plan and play them against your market research you have completed when you have done that you will see a "road map" of what needs to be done to meet your business goals

TreePro
08-08-2008, 08:52 AM
I understand nobody wants to give out their numbers. What I'm trying to get at is what I can expect (a range of say $xx.xx - $xx.xx) to make in revenue per day or week for say a 3 man crew. I know it depends on a lot of variables, but any ballparks would be great here. I already have a number, but would like to see if it is somewhat close to what you all are really getting.

Anybody that wouldn't mind throwing a number out I would greatly appreciate it.

Stillwater
08-08-2008, 11:40 AM
some guys, large operations and small are 1 job away from bankruptcy. How is that for a number.

SuperDuty335
08-08-2008, 06:11 PM
some guys, large operations and small are 1 job away from bankruptcy. How is that for a number.

Well said.

zedosix
08-08-2008, 09:18 PM
How motivated you and your men are will likely determine what your gross revenue will be. And about 30 other factors. Like economy (not good in your country now), experience in the field (sounds like none at the moment) and .........................

DVS Hardscaper
08-08-2008, 11:12 PM
Letz look at things from a different angle, shall we?

This isn't a get rich quick industry. Infact, hardscaping ranks at the bottom of the list in terms of profit for each facit related to the green industry. Last I read, the average, national, net profit was 8%.

As with anything in life, your success is dependent on your passion for the industry. I see so many people enter into this industry but they never get too far. Primarily because they lack passion.

If you are watching TV, and theres even a 2x2 area of pavers visible, do you notice it instantly? I do, and I make sure I point it out to whoever is around!

As you drive around in your travels, do you pick up on hardscape projects, especially when they're damn near hidden?

When you see a completed hardscape job what do you see when you look at it?

This is not an industry where you wake up one morning and decide "hey I wanna build patios". And thats what many do. And they never make it very far. There is a reason why the word "HARD" is in the term "hardscaping".

I live a comfortable life. But keep in mind, I'm a simple guy and I'm not into glitter and glamour, I don't require alot to be content and happy. Many people may think "look at him, he's got it made". Well, I wish! What I have did not magically appear over night. It took YEARS and YEARS of mistakes, hard lessons, dedication, perserverance, and PASSION.


http://www.outdoorfinishes.com


.

hickslawns
08-09-2008, 01:00 AM
Don't worry about how much revenue you can turn. Think about how much you can keep. This is a better way to think about it. If you crank out a $15k job and kept 3 guys busy for a week or so . . . but you spent $14,500 to do the job then you might as well be punching a time clock and hardscaping for the guy down the road.

Mike33
08-09-2008, 01:14 AM
It also like if your doing well with what you are doing, don't fix whats not broke. Example i build a lot of walls in my area but i do not install pavers. Why, i do well with walls and and at times barely keep up so why do i want to take on pavers and maybe cant handle the market or loose money compared to wall building. As far as numbers i dont think any one is going to discuss that. Its almost like figure it out for your self and make your own descision
mike