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View Full Version : Mow after fall overseeding


jondcoleman
08-12-2008, 01:16 PM
I offer aeration and overseeding to a lot of my customers in the fall and I am wondering how good it is to continue mowing with commercial mowers after seeding. I feel like the large tires will kill a lot of the new seedlings? What do you think or what is your practice? Thanks!

americanlawn
08-12-2008, 06:43 PM
We have found that the tire tracks offer better germination than the "open areas". Compacting the seed into the soil is a good thing IMO.

garydale
08-13-2008, 12:44 PM
We have found that the tire tracks offer better germination than the "open areas". Compacting the seed into the soil is a good thing IMO.

I'm with Americanlawn on seed/soil contact. Continue mowing when there is something tall enough to cut.

Jeff Tracey Enterprises
08-31-2008, 07:50 PM
not to sound like an idiot but..... I normally wait at least 2 or 3 weeks to mow after seeding just so my mower doesn't blow all the seed that hasn't washed into the hole's away. Have I been doing this wrong???

greenviewlandscaper
08-31-2008, 09:03 PM
no not at all Ive worked for 3 different landscape companies and have done the same thing and had good results by not mowing the new seeds until they sustain a good root system. Great results this way in the fall anyway.

rcreech
08-31-2008, 09:41 PM
Anytime you are seeding (core/seed or slice seed) it is best to mow really short before seeding (cut really low about 2").

This will do two things:
1) You will get better penetration with equipment and seed placement (hence seed to soil contact)
2) It will set the turf back a little which will allow you a little more time before the next mowing and cut down on competition from the existing turf.

After a good rain, I am not afraid to have them mow. Just make sure the turf isn't wet so you don't tear up/out the new grass. I also recommend mowing a little higher on the first cut (3") after seeding.

pinto n mwr
08-31-2008, 09:45 PM
curious, if one is doing the fertilzation and weed control throughout the year then why is one selling/doing an aeration plus overseeding?

ProLawns
08-31-2008, 10:00 PM
curious, if one is doing the fertilzation and weed control throughout the year then why is one selling/doing an aeration plus overseeding?

Where I live in the transition zone with hot humid summers fescue will thin out unless the turf is managed perfectly which is not always easily achieved. So seeding at 5lbs. per thousand thickens it back up in the fall.

rcreech
08-31-2008, 10:28 PM
curious, if one is doing the fertilzation and weed control throughout the year then why is one selling/doing an aeration plus overseeding?

Just to list a few reasons for seeding:

Insects
Drought
New customer
Shaded areas
Disease

There are many other reason also...but I just don't feel like thinking this late in the evening.

Aeration is almost ALWAYS needed on EVERY Ohio lawn and this is a great time to seed those thinner areas that need that "thickening up".

LushGreenLawn
09-01-2008, 07:32 AM
Grass is not immortal. Every year, some grass dies due to "Old Age" just like people do. You lose a small percentage every year. Overseeding replaces the dying grass. Of course, there are other reasons for thinning turf also, especially traffic from kids, BBQ's, ect.

Also, generally speaking, the seed you are overseeding with will be a newer, more disease resistant variety than what you have, therefore making your lawn more disease resistant over time.

tremor
09-01-2008, 09:31 AM
If the seed is properly integrated for seed/soil contact then mowing is not an issue.

Cool Season: NOT mowing results in a moono-stand of Ryegrass. As Rye germinates & grows it will join the existing grasses in shading out Blues & Fescues.

Jeff Tracey Enterprises
09-01-2008, 04:56 PM
But just using a regular commercial seed spreader will that do the trick to " properly integrate" ( not trying to sound like a smart a$$ by any means all help is greatly appreciated) the seed. When I aerate, I use a Ryan core aerator, seed then fertilize. In both spring and fall seeding I also hand seed any bare spots and put topsoil over it. It has always worked well for me in the past, just wondering if I've been doing it wrong all this time. I'm a firm believer in the phrase " if it aint broke dont fix it" but still always looking to better myself for my customers. Thanks again Jeff

rcreech
09-01-2008, 07:26 PM
But just using a regular commercial seed spreader will that do the trick to " properly integrate" ( not trying to sound like a smart a$$ by any means all help is greatly appreciated) the seed. When I aerate, I use a Ryan core aerator, seed then fertilize. In both spring and fall seeding I also hand seed any bare spots and put topsoil over it. It has always worked well for me in the past, just wondering if I've been doing it wrong all this time. I'm a firm believer in the phrase " if it aint broke dont fix it" but still always looking to better myself for my customers. Thanks again Jeff

Should work great! I think this is the way we all do a core/seeding.

Again, I like to see a rain or watering before a mowing! It just helps "seat" the seed and get some good soil contact.

And again, I think rasing the deck helps a little also (less vaccum).

That is my advice anyway. What do the rest of you think?

LushGreenLawn
09-01-2008, 09:02 PM
I always use a seed slicer. I have never gotten good germination just broadcasting. I assumed most of the seeds would wash into the holes from the aerator and be to deep to germinate once the holes filled in.

How many of you Broadcast vs. Slice Seed? Broadcasting is much, much easier, mabye I should experiment with it a little more?

tremor
09-01-2008, 10:05 PM
I always use a seed slicer. I have never gotten good germination just broadcasting. I assumed most of the seeds would wash into the holes from the aerator and be to deep to germinate once the holes filled in.

How many of you Broadcast vs. Slice Seed? Broadcasting is much, much easier, mabye I should experiment with it a little more?

This is correct. Penn State published the results of a study that confirmed this/ Unless the aerator tines are limited to a quarter inch in depth or the holes are refilled, seed that lands into the holes fails to establish. Running a slice seeder after aerating is the way to get maximum establishment

rcreech
09-01-2008, 10:10 PM
This is correct. Penn State published the results of a study that confirmed this/ Unless the aerator tines are limited to a quarter inch in depth or the holes are refilled, seed that lands into the holes fails to establish. Running a slice seeder after aerating is the way to get maximum establishment

I know it is much better to core and then slice seed...but I guarantee nobody around here is going to pay what it is worth!

What do you guys charge per K for a core/slice seed?

Core Aeration isn't cheap...then you make another pass seeding and that gets salty!

I have had very good luck with core/seeding...and I always get good germ even in the core holes.

LushGreenLawn
09-02-2008, 06:51 AM
I charge my price to aerate plus the cost of the seed. I get a discount on my seed, so I am charging retail and keeping my discount as additional profit.

I aerate the first two weeks of September, and overseed the last two weeks of September. That way I can go out with a helper and second machine, do all my aeratings, let the holes break down a little, and then do the same thing with the seed slicer. It makes it pretty efficient using the same machine all day, and it reinforces to the customer that they are paying for two seperate services.

I also sell a fair amount by explaining the difference between broadcast seeding and slit seeding, once they know the difference, they are willing to pay a little extra.

Jeff Tracey Enterprises
09-02-2008, 09:07 AM
what exactly is a "seed slicer"?? and with that being said is it similar to a broadcast spreader?? And how much do they usually run for one??( Just ballpark) I really haven't had any problems with seed growth/germination in the core holes. I always tell my clients to water for at least 1 hour the night that I aerate, seed and fertilize. I know that I should get soil tests for the lawns I work on but what are you guys' feelings on liming? Thanks for everyones replies and thoughts. Jeff

garydale
09-03-2008, 11:43 AM
Attached is a photo of a Lesco unit. COST $3900.00

Think of it as dethatcher that drops grass seed in the slits made by the blades.
Best results when you slice seed in two directions IMO.

As for lime we follow the practice of doing a maintenance lime application each year. (15 lbs. per K)
The theory is based on the fact that with most lawns the pH drops a .25 point each year. The drop is due to acid rain, organic and mineral material breakdown, fertilizer, (especially with Sulla).

By doing annual maintenance lime appl."s you avoid "feast and famine" of the pH reducing fertilizer benefit. Also puts you on site one more time for $$ and spot treatments.