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View Full Version : Dying Lawn - Help ID Cause Please


jondcoleman
08-12-2008, 03:48 PM
The owners have a dog, don't irrigate, and I fertilize it. Help!!!

jondcoleman
08-12-2008, 03:51 PM
http://lh6.ggpht.com/jondebicoleman/SKHYrWrja5I/AAAAAAAAAhw/LTHzwTwEIAU/IMG_3361.jpg?imgmax=400

http://lh5.ggpht.com/jondebicoleman/SKHYs7zITmI/AAAAAAAAAh4/e9liMbVirY0/IMG_3362.jpg?imgmax=400

http://lh4.ggpht.com/jondebicoleman/SKHYpgkIfVI/AAAAAAAAAho/EONufwTCtAI/IMG_3360.jpg?imgmax=400

jondcoleman
08-12-2008, 03:52 PM
<a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/jondebicoleman/20080812LawnPics/photo#5233702544953824322"><img src="http://lh5.ggpht.com/jondebicoleman/SKHYvDwH1EI/AAAAAAAAAiA/lNJ5QwoLnb0/s144/IMG_3363.jpg" /></a>

Real Green
08-12-2008, 04:18 PM
Sure looks an awful lot like drought damage to me, but that is just my thoughts from looking at a picture. Did you take a soil probe with you when you went to look at it? That will tell you the problem right there...

heritage
08-12-2008, 06:33 PM
Plant some "Gravel".

Sorry but Turf won't make it without water/DOG, AND high salts.

Pete

Green Up
08-13-2008, 10:10 AM
What type of fertilizer did you use and at what rate? It looks like the nitorgen might had been the straw that broke the camels back. You really have to be careful in the hot weather conditions with no irrigation.

Frank Fescue
08-13-2008, 04:14 PM
Im using a crummy computer right now in the pesticide area, so my monitor isnt great.

But i'm guessing its stress. I can still see the pass you made right down the middle. Unless you took this picture immeditally following an app im thinking stress.

Tell them living things need water to live and without it they'll die. Its pretty simple.

jondcoleman
08-13-2008, 04:53 PM
Thanks for all of the replies. The last app I did was 24-0-11 at at between 2-3 lbs per M. That would be somewhere between .5 and .75 lbs Nitrogen.

If you look in the one pic, the area near the hose (which leaks) is looking great so it must be the combination of drought stress and the dog.

sclawndr
08-13-2008, 06:36 PM
.5 to .75 pounds of N in July is a lot in your area. the average temp in July was 85 and there were a lot of 90 degree days. If the N wasn't the cause, it sure didn't help. We only put N down in July if we know with certainty that the irrigation systems are turned on and running regularly. Save your money and just treat for weeds and insects in July.

junior091273
08-13-2008, 08:59 PM
I don't even waste my time with properties where the owners dont clean up after their pets.

Looks like the majority of that damage is because Fido uses it as a litter box.

jondcoleman
08-14-2008, 11:14 AM
My app was in late May, not in July. Was that ok?

sclawndr
08-14-2008, 01:36 PM
My app was in late May, not in July. Was that ok?

Then it wasn't a factor in this. Disease, heat stress or mowing too short is the most likely cause. We have more problems with mowing than anything else. Why a customer would pay us and then mow their lawn an inch and a half tall is beyond me.

Marcos
08-14-2008, 03:19 PM
The owners have a dog, don't irrigate, and I fertilize it. Help!!!

If they simply don't irrigate, or can't irrigate that area, you're probably better off going with a low N organic product back there for the summer round.

Or, you could aerate & topdress the turf in that area with relatively thin layer of finished compost ( NOT manure!) in the mid-to-late spring, long before the 'dog days', for sure.

The constant bombardment of that soil with high levels of atmosphere-derived N's, along with mined P's & K's, along with the concentrated of the dog excrement and urine (often VERY acid)....could make for a potential biological disaster!

It's true that many of even the nicest, lushest GREENEST chemically fertilized yards are indeed 'biologically DEAD'. :cry: