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FIMCO-MEISTER
08-13-2008, 12:39 PM
Trying to troubleshoot a TORO hydraulic system. N. O. and have a supply line leak. So I shut down the valves with my hose do-dad and now have the supply line under pressure hoping to find the leak after I finish paper stuff.

DanaMac
08-13-2008, 12:46 PM
I'd like to take a class sometime to learn about hydro systems. It's all greek to me.

Wet_Boots
08-13-2008, 01:06 PM
I'm surprised they can last as long as they do, given the troubles that a rodent could cause them.

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-13-2008, 01:48 PM
I'm surprised they can last as long as they do, given the troubles that a rodent could cause them.

We don't have tunneling rodents here so not a problem. They do last a long time. Some still have the original valves from 30 years ago. If I was managing a golf course that was prone to lightning I'd want my system to be hydraulic.. If you think having all red wire for zones is a headache if cut. Try putting 20 hydraulic tubes back together with one being the supply.:dizzy:

EagleLandscape
08-13-2008, 04:16 PM
peter, looks like fun:)

CAPT Stream Rotar
08-13-2008, 04:19 PM
godspeed peter!

I'd love to learn more about those.

irritation
08-13-2008, 04:48 PM
Toro does have a "hose do-dad" - hose end to hydraulic tubing connection. But your's is much bigger.

londonrain
08-13-2008, 05:52 PM
I just did a hydraulic to electric conversion last week on a Toro system at a ball field with Toro 640s ....Added a new ESP MC 16 and a 12 zone Toro converter... Easy conversion and the system is a normally open hydraulic type...

Waterit
08-13-2008, 05:54 PM
Toro does have a "hose do-dad" - hose end to hydraulic tubing connection. But your's is much bigger.

He's from Texas, of COURSE it's bigger:rolleyes:

Without A Drought
08-13-2008, 06:36 PM
god bless ya. out of about 2,000 systems, we have maybe 5 that are still hydraulic, and they're on life support. if they go down, i turn the system off, give them an estimate to change to electric, and i'm on my way. up here it's rather difficult to get the parts to service those systems. thankfully, they're almost always manifolded right at the foundation and relatively easy (not inexpensive) to convert.

greenmonster304
08-13-2008, 07:24 PM
god bless you sir

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-13-2008, 08:32 PM
Sometimes its just your day! Leak right next to a sidewalk so I picked up the water fast. Took it apart and it was a previous repair using 1/4" drip tubing and plastic drip couplers. Turns out the yard was landscaped a year ago and the landscaper hit it I'm guessing and did a "whatever it takes to get my check repair". Felt good getting this one knocked out since this guy was a great customer who is now dieing from prostate cancer.

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-13-2008, 08:33 PM
Toro does have a "hose do-dad" - hose end to hydraulic tubing connection. But your's is much bigger.

Made my dodad at the funky HD brass stuff collection.

Midlo Snow Maker
08-13-2008, 08:42 PM
yea i just had to do the same thing last week, we still have like 50 hyd. systems left

DanaMac
08-13-2008, 08:52 PM
yea i just had to do the same thing last week, we still have like 50 hyd. systems left

geez, I never realized how popular they were at one time. Do people still put them in?

irrig8r
08-14-2008, 12:30 AM
I've only run across a handful...one was by Toro....called a Freetime (maybe?) it was on a municipal job that still had some Skinner lines too...

Another system showed up only after a rare hard freeze thawed out again.... owner didn't even know it was there. All the valves tried to open at once so his yard was flooded and there was no pressure to the house. Had to run a new mainline and bypass it all.

He had another sprinkler system put in a few years earlier with new landscaping and we determined the leak was not from any of that. The old hydraulic system had just been abandoned, but still connected to the original galvanized main.

bicmudpuppy
08-14-2008, 12:39 AM
I haven't seen a new hydraulic install for over 20 years....................On a side note, how many irrigators in your respective areas do you know who can work on/trouble shoot hydraulic systems?

It wouldn't be an inclusive list, but in the KC metro/ NE Kansas area, besides me before moving, I would have said there MIGHT have been six.

Waterit
08-14-2008, 12:47 AM
I haven't seen a new hydraulic install for over 20 years....................On a side note, how many irrigators in your respective areas do you know who can work on/trouble shoot hydraulic systems?

It wouldn't be an inclusive list, but in the KC metro/ NE Kansas area, besides me before moving, I would have said there MIGHT have been six.

We might have 3.

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-14-2008, 05:38 AM
I learned this biz from 78-79 while a student at Texas A&M putting in systems for a professor. We were a pure TORO company and I installed many a NO and pin type system. Frankly having the knowledge to work on these can be a real PIA since you feel obligated to use your knowledge to help people out. I'll be thankful when I never see another hydraulic system again. Unfortunately for some poor service guy in College Station/Bryan the place is filled with them and I helped put many in.

EagleLandscape
08-14-2008, 07:45 AM
you probably put the one in at my sisters house in College Station. That thing is a mess, and I won't even touch it

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-14-2008, 07:51 AM
you probably put the one in at my sisters house in College Station. That thing is a mess, and I won't even touch it

I've made Henry an expert on them:) A knowledge he has come to regret. The secret to hydraulic service is to never work on more than 3 a year. Otherwise you turn into that goofy troll from the Lord of The Rings.:dizzy:

EagleLandscape
08-14-2008, 08:02 AM
.:holds hydro tube:.

"Oh my precious..."

koster_irrigation
08-14-2008, 06:28 PM
I have Zero hydraulic systems, Thank GOD!!! Looks like a nightmare.

How the HE** do you trace a valve???? Shovel and mexi man?

CAPT Stream Rotar
08-14-2008, 06:33 PM
I have Zero hydraulic systems, Thank GOD!!! Looks like a nightmare.

How the HE** do you trace a valve???? Shovel and mexi man?



nice koster!

I have serviced over 1000 accounts up North here and not a single hydraulic system.

Mike Leary
08-14-2008, 07:32 PM
nice koster!

I have serviced over 1000 accounts up North here and not a single hydraulic system.

We have none, I looked at one years ago, I told the HO I had no experience
with hydraulics, he looked at me and said, "up grade it". We did. :)

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-14-2008, 08:53 PM
I have Zero hydraulic systems, Thank GOD!!! Looks like a nightmare.

How the HE** do you trace a valve???? Shovel and mexi man?



You just know where to dig.:rolleyes: Lotta potholing. I've gotten pretty good at hitting homeruns. Study the terrain/profiling the company/researching the employee list for potential trencherman:rolleyes:

just think of me as TORO HYDRAULIC VALVE PROFILERMAN;)

DanaMac
08-14-2008, 09:30 PM
On a side note, how many irrigators in your respective areas do you know who can work on/trouble shoot hydraulic systems?

I can think of a couple old timers that most likely can. And I think SprinklerGuy Tony had said he knew a little about them, but he is retired :) Not sure if Tom Tom does, he's been at this a while longer than myself.

bicmudpuppy
08-14-2008, 09:53 PM
I have Zero hydraulic systems, Thank GOD!!! Looks like a nightmare.

How the HE** do you trace a valve???? Shovel and mexi man?



It's the most "ART" part of this profession. If your in an area with multiple hydraulic systems, then you will get a feel for how the company (or companies) installed said systems. You learn to *think* like the guy who installed the system. It is a lot like hunting for a solenoid valve w/o a 521 and all the valves boxes are buried a min of 6". The one difference is that the guy who installed the system probably intended the system to have an as-built AND he intended to be able to go back and work on said system. This means that *usually* (feels a lot like ASSUME or SWAG) used "tricks" to help spot the valve.

With hydraulic systems, you don't just say...........the valve works best ........HERE. In stead, you say..........the valve needs to be near here, where can I find it when I want to, anytime in the next ten years. You use the line that extends with the foundation.........or the sidewalk.........or...You get the idea. With this in mind, you look for what was or might have been there to use to help locate that valve to put it on an as-built, etc. Once you get a good track on the main line, it becomes *easier*. BTW, it never gets EASY :(

Kiril
08-15-2008, 12:55 AM
The secret to hydraulic service is to never work on more than 3 a year.

And here I thought the secret was to yank em. :laugh:

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-15-2008, 07:53 AM
geez, I never realized how popular they were at one time. Do people still put them in?

It's a case of whether you had a TORO installer from the 70s who was brainwashed in a TORO scientology class and also was a successful salesman. Just so happens in Dallas we had one company that got big and installed a lot of them. Any time I go into the hillcrest/Spring Valley area of Dallas I have a nagging fear that I'm going to run into a hydraulic system. Houses that were built in the mid 70s seem to be the main culprits of this sad period in United States irrigation. At least the guy who installed upside down FIMCOs:dizzy: never got his business off the ground THANK GOODNESS:clapping:

Waterit
08-15-2008, 07:59 AM
At least the guy who installed upside down FIMCOs:dizzy: never got his business off the ground THANK GOODNESS:clapping:

Are you serious? Upside down? The Davis Flow valve would work in just about any configuration, even buried, but I've never seen or even heard of any other indexer being put in upside down.

That guy probably moved here and started installing the systems we still come across that use one control valve to run an indexer. These systems usually also feature rotors and sprays mixed, P3PJ's on 1/2" risers, and full circle sprays running up the middle of the narrow side of the driveway leaving dry scallops in their wake.

FIMCO-MEISTER
08-15-2008, 08:28 AM
Are you serious? Upside down? The Davis Flow valve would work in just about any configuration, even buried, but I've never seen or even heard of any other indexer being put in upside down.

That guy probably moved here and started installing the systems we still come across that use one control valve to run an indexer. These systems usually also feature rotors and sprays mixed, P3PJ's on 1/2" risers, and full circle sprays running up the middle of the narrow side of the driveway leaving dry scallops in their wake.

Do a search for my upside down FIMCO thread. Good read on a slow day. Bring it to the top with a post.