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SprayGreenGuy
08-14-2008, 02:34 PM
I just moved into this rental house with a yard with 98% crabgrass. I am trying to find a inexpensive way to battle it. I am in northern mississippi. I just overseeded with slit seeder and core aerated it, and. I was wondering if I should put some weed a feed on it now. Or should I wait and put preemergence on it during feb. There is not much real grass out there now. I just overseeded with bermuda the other day to try and get a few strands of real grass out there. Its a small yard so it dont cost much to seed. And I have siltseeders and core aerators I can use. I work for spraygreens.

Any Suggestions??????

Marcos
08-14-2008, 03:48 PM
I just moved into this rental house with a yard with 98% crabgrass. I am trying to find a inexpensive way to battle it. I am in northern mississippi. I just overseeded with slit seeder and core aerated it, and. I was wondering if I should put some weed a feed on it now. Or should I wait and put preemergence on it during feb. There is not much real grass out there now. I just overseeded with bermuda the other day to try and get a few strands of real grass out there. Its a small yard so it dont cost much to seed. And I have siltseeders and core aerators I can use. I work for spraygreens.

Any Suggestions??????

I don't know the timing for Mississippi seeding, but it seems to me that you're swimming upstream right now.

Why don't you wait until it all starts to turn purple and die naturally, before you get serious about trying to get bermuda (or whatever) to compete with it.

A know you're a lot further south than me, but all crabgrass is an annual plant, so thus it has to die SOMETIME, right?!?

SprayGreenGuy
08-14-2008, 04:08 PM
thats what i was asking. So you think I should let it die and then put preemergance on the lawn around feb or march before the crabgrass germinates again.

Richard Martin
08-14-2008, 04:52 PM
I work for spraygreens.

Any Suggestions??????

I'm guessing SprayGreens is some sort of fert comapny? One would think that you would already know what to do but anyway...

Kill the entire yard with glyphosate right now. It's getting a little late in the year to get good results from warm season grasses but you can always try. Mix up a 50-50 mix of annual rye and Burmuda and slit seed your yard in 2 directions. One direction should be back and forth and the second direction should be at a 45 degree angle to the first direction. Hit it with some starter fert and lots of water. After about 6 weeks hit your whole yard with Pre-em. Next Spring hit the yard again with Pre-em just as the Forsythia starts to bloom. If you want to do it the scientific way then wait until the soil averages about 55 degrees and hit it with Pre-em. 8 weeks after you hit it with Pre-em in the Spring hit it again. I know it's a lot of Pre-em but you have to deal with crabgrass very aggressively. Next Fall do it all over again. Repeat until you get the desired results.

ALC-GregH
08-14-2008, 04:59 PM
I'm guessing SprayGreens is some sort of fert comapny? One would think that you would already know what to do but anyway....

ZING......

dura to the max
08-14-2008, 06:06 PM
I'm guessing SprayGreens is some sort of fert comapny? One would think that you would already know what to do but anyway...


my thoughts exactly.


you could also use MSMA on crabgrass. according to my understanding it would take about 3-4 apps. then use the pre-emergent in the spring

SprayGreenGuy
08-14-2008, 06:44 PM
Thanks but you don't have to smash me when I ask a question. You can just answer. Ask any moderator for the site they would rather you not answer, then put some one down for asking something. If people getting made fun of for asking questions they will stop coming to the site to learn. I just started with spraygreens a month ago. We only do organtic ferterlizing not complete renivations. Thats why I joined this site was to learn. Thanks for the infomation though.

Richard Martin
08-14-2008, 07:39 PM
Hey, if I wanted to just beat you up I would have only done that. I just found it odd that you work for a fert company and ask these kinds of questions. Don't take it personal.

dura to the max
08-14-2008, 08:57 PM
thats lawn site for you. you gotta have tough skin. EVERYONE gets the crap from other members, even the big names that everyone know such as topsites. it was a little odd that you asked what you did after saying what you do for a living. nothing personal.

brucec32
08-18-2008, 01:50 AM
Be fair guys, employees of squirt-ferts don't have to know all this, they just have to be able to properly apply what the boss says to and identify some basic lawn problems. They only train them so far. If they knew every facet of it they would become competitors rather than employees.

As far as seeding Bermuda, I was considering the same for my Tall Fescue lawn that has summer-health problems so that I can actually have a nice lawn during summer. I'm willing to put up with dormancy in the winter. I also want a test bed for mowing techniques and machines and this is the only way short of mowing someone's lawn for free all year. My plan is to reseed with fescue and have a nice winter lawn Nov-May, then mow it low and aerate/slit seed it in June when the Fescue starts to look bad anyway and hopefully transition it over the summer and fully by the next spring, killing the remaining fescue over winter.

It is a little late to be seeding the lawn with Bermuda, since it will just be coming up when cooler temps arrive and shut it down. For that reason I would NOT kill any existing crabgrass (more likely perennial grassy weeds that look like crabgrass mixed in too). It will go dormant and look pretty much like the dormant bermuda stems would anyway. If you kill it now it will deteriorate and you may have a nice mud lawn this winter.

Mid winter when the Bermuda is surely dormant, you may want to selectively spray any grass that is obviously neither bermuda nor crabgrass with glyphsate.

You should have enough growing weeks (read the package) to be able to apply pre-emergent in late winter. Then hit anything that comes up green that isn't Bermuda with the appropriate post-emergents.

With luck your Bermuda will get lots of rain and start to resemble a real lawn by midsummer next year. I think the success of this tactic depends on getting enough rain to help the Bermuda get started.

I had a customer who killed his weedpatch lawn (almost a full acre of it!) in March and sowed Bermuda. Along with a few patches of old Bermuda existing he had a pretty decent common bermuda lawn by the end of the summer and a year later it was nearly perfect. But he had good soil and hammered it with water as needed using portable sprinklers, which was a lot of work.

I may be missing something here. I'm doing it off the cuff. But I think it will work and is more desireable than a lawn full of tall fast growing weeds.

Just mow the weeds low now and that inhibits their growth a bit. The bermuda can of course handle low mowing. Good luck.

topsites
08-18-2008, 02:25 AM
Not that I'd expect this to make any difference, there exists here a complete lack of
comprehension on the exact methods and all that's going on is someone is going to throw
several hundred dollars at their yard, see little result, be disappointed, and give up.
At least that's what usually happens, and now that I've said something it is as
likely to get this person fired up but it might make matters worse.

Fact is, we got ourselves a complete noob.

That having been said...
It takes YEARS to learn how to maintain a beautiful lawn, these things don't
come up by accident and it isn't something that can be explained away either,
no matter what I say it isn't going to set this crap straight in any manner of time
other than several years of continuous treatment and education, probably expect it
to take 5-10 years, that's with a consistent effort.
Have I lost you yet?

So I think you should hire a big name company such as Chemlawn or Scott's to take care of this or you might talk to some folks around you and see whom they recommend.

That's the easy way out, the other way is to start on the path of educating yourself
on what it's going to take, and stop thinking that your crap lot is going to look beautiful
in any less time than several years, stop throwing stuff at it without thinking it through,
get your panties out of a bunch and then you might get somewhere.

To battle the problem is going to take more than some seed and weed,
you'll need a concrete plan so sit down and start learning before you
spend any more money foolishly.

greendoctor
08-18-2008, 06:17 AM
Just mow the weeds low now and that inhibits their growth a bit. The bermuda can of course handle low mowing. Good luck.

This is a very important part of bermuda grass management. If you want a bermuda lawn, mow it at less than 1", fertilize it with 1 lb/M nitrogen and up to 1/2 lb potassium per month of growing season, and irrigate if there is less than 1 inch of rain falling per week. I have seen many areas that are intended to be bermuda turn into a random hodge podge of weedy grasses because of failure to follow one or all of the principles above. You can spray all kinds of herbicides on the lawn to kill and prevent weeds in spite of what I consider incorrect management of the bermuda. Be careful of Dimension, Barricade and Pre-M, those are root pruning herbicides that damage bermuda stolons. I seldom apply those herbicides to a bermuda lawn. I will use simazine, Sencor, and Gallery at the right times for target weeds, but there is no such thing as keeping a lawn on Pre-M. In my location that would mean doing another application every 4 months.

Even though bermuda is drought tolerant, it becomes noncompetitive if it is drought stressed. Don't want weeds, do not let it dry out in hot weather. However it is possible to adversely affect bermuda by overwatering. I suggest one deep watering once per week. Frequent light irrigations helps weeds to grow and increases the chance of disease.

Richard Martin
08-18-2008, 05:36 PM
Let me point out that fertilizer recommendations are extremely regional and actually vary from yard to yard. For example in the area I live in the ground has been farmed for centuries. While fertilization of these many thousands of acres is relatively recent these grounds are still very, very high in pH due to the farmers only worrying about growing corn, tobacco and soybeans. A soil test is a must before any fertilizer program can be started.

Let me also add that while the science behind Pre-em may discount it's use with Burmuda the actual practice shows zero negative effects. Once Burmuda gets established it is almost impossible to get rid of it. It is extremely hardy, grows in almost any soil but seems to really like clay and is very invasive. I have dealt with lots of Burmuda in my days.