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View Full Version : wife and i need help with landscape design around house


grass disaster
08-17-2008, 06:21 PM
we could use some suggestions for some bushes around our house. we are looking for hardy bushes that don't require a whole lot of maintenance.

we would appreciate any help you landscapers could offer. i'm not very good with picking out designs.

grass disaster
08-17-2008, 06:23 PM
we want to leave this side alone we have hydrangeas on this side

grass disaster
08-17-2008, 06:23 PM
back side of the house by the ac unit

grass disaster
08-17-2008, 06:24 PM
east side of the house

grass disaster
08-17-2008, 06:26 PM
no plans for bushes here on the north side we plan on putting the deck here....if i ever get around to this proj*trucewhiteflag*ect

grass disaster
08-17-2008, 06:27 PM
and one last one for your viewing pleasure

grass disaster
08-17-2008, 11:56 PM
bump bump
.......................

Isobel
08-18-2008, 01:39 AM
why don't you hire a landscape designer that is familiar with your area? We all do this as a business, and therefore you may find not alot of people want to just give out information for free unless there is some monetary gain for them.

just my 2 cents.

Smallaxe
08-18-2008, 08:50 AM
The whole neighborhood seems void of any kind of shade. I think some trees and bushes around more than just next to the house. Probably some Technys around the air conditioning unit and let them grow up to the window, so plant several feet out into the lawn.

Put a large maple on the south side where the new deck will be and have some shade. This place must bake in summer and freeze in winter. A row of technys on the west property line makes a nice wind break for winter.

That is just my impulse. I do not pretend to do good designs. I have ideas that I like, but leaves others scratching their heads. Then of course when I see what others have done I say - "what was the point of that?? More crap to mow around but serves no function." :)

FordLawnLandscape
08-18-2008, 08:17 PM
Not to come off as a jerk or nething bro but .. ARE YOU SERIOUS ??? :laugh: Next time somethings wrong w/ your car go to the nearest mechanic shop, get him to tell u whats causing it to run bad and then ask if you can borrow his tools to fix YOUR car !! Are ya catching what im throwing atcha ??

grass disaster
08-18-2008, 10:09 PM
i've dished out plenty of free info on here. i just thought someone would be willing to give me some advice other than call a landscaper.

Lawnworks
08-18-2008, 10:20 PM
I guess they are more saying... hire a landscape architect... around here I can hire one to come out to a job do rough sketch on site for $75 an hour... probably be $150 max. Then you do the install. Do you have irrigation? That would really be the first step.

Lawnworks
08-18-2008, 10:24 PM
My guess is you will want a half moon of perrenials(day lilies, lantana) below the windows or some type ground cover(asiatic jasmine, lariope, mondo). The shrubbery you could do carrisa hollies, clearya, tea olives, loropetalum, or knock out roses. Keep in mind you want to landscape in groups of plants... not really one of each... I don't know if this helps.

Mike33
08-18-2008, 11:15 PM
What did you do for 1457 posts? Check with Dreams to Designs Kirk is a member here and does outstanding work. He helped with my design for my new home last fall. We have never met and live 400 miles apart, but with pics and phone conversation he gave me an excellant design. BTW i also paid him for his prof. service's
Mike

Dreams To Designs
08-20-2008, 11:23 AM
Grass Disaster, I'd be happy to help, but unlike yourself, that makes money with your tools and equipment, most of my tools are in my head along with knowledge that I or any designer and architect get paid for. Unfortunately, most information you get for free, is worth what you paid for.

A professional design needs a great deal of information an communication, which take time. You seem to have a very nice home from the pictures, I'm sure you have decorated the inside with quality and care and should do the same for the exterior. Do the landscaping justice by getting a designer involved and you will be rewarded with a well intentioned plan with sustainability that will meet and reflect your home's demands. You may do better or be more comfortable with someone local, that can actually come over and look and speak with you in person, if not myself, other members or internet professional services can assist you with consultations, plant suggestions, imaging or a full master plan.

Mike, thanks for the kudos. You and your wife have a beautiful home that is as pleasant from the outside as it is on the inside.

Kirk

allinearth
08-21-2008, 08:39 PM
Take kirk's advice.

mdvaden
08-23-2008, 05:36 AM
i've dished out plenty of free info on here. i just thought someone would be willing to give me some advice other than call a landscaper.

Your plan of action starting with the first post is not an optimum way to go.

I just met someone in person a couple of days ago, and even then, being there, it took a half hour to figure out a solution to spare him spending a needless $5000 associated with one minor issue that was interwoven.

But it meant being there.

You could do as well dragging the photos to your local garden nursery.

Are you in too much of a financial bind to have a good designer come out and help you get off on the right foot?

PaperCutter
08-24-2008, 10:32 AM
I think you're getting advised to find a designer because you're looking to create YOUR landscape, for YOUR home. When I first spend time with a client on the initial site visit, it's not unusual for me to be there for an hour or two. We walk the site, I listen to to what they want, I look for things that may be an issue and ask a ton of questions.

I could look at your photos and slam out some quick, uninformed recommendations. More than likely, you'd come back with "yeah, but that would block... down the road we're going to... my wife really prefers..." All stuff that a lot of people don't know are issues until someone draws it out of them.

It's your home, you have to live there, and to be honest it'll be a bit of a reflection on you as a landscape guy. If you've run across any designers in the course of doing what you do, see what they would charge you. I've been known to hook a brother up at a discount if they're in the industry and can send me some referrals.

wildstarblazer
08-28-2008, 08:52 PM
I have to say though, disaster seemed to lay out his project pretty straight foward. I do a small amount of this kind of design work online and will be doing more as time lets me but if I had customers send me requests this good it would make my job easier. I also agree with what everybody said too. It does take time and we like to get paid for time. One quick picture is one thing but any more than that gets into some time. I specialize in the south east but if I have time I will try to draw something up for you for free. I enjoy the practice plus could use critiques anyway. No promises but if I can get to it I will...

grass disaster
08-28-2008, 10:57 PM
I have to say though, disaster seemed to lay out his project pretty straight foward. I do a small amount of this kind of design work online and will be doing more as time lets me but if I had customers send me requests this good it would make my job easier. I also agree with what everybody said too. It does take time and we like to get paid for time. One quick picture is one thing but any more than that gets into some time. I specialize in the south east but if I have time I will try to draw something up for you for free. I enjoy the practice plus could use critiques anyway. No promises but if I can get to it I will...

that would be great. thanks.

cudaclan
08-30-2008, 07:34 PM
You are located in a zone 4 area, plantings appropriate for that location. The siding on the house is low; do not elevate it any higher for plantings (rot/insect damage). Most of the selections listed are prone to borers. Minimal insecticidal applications may be required. Also, they prefer (most) acidic PH. Not sure of your regions PH. However, leaching from the foundation will raise (slightly) PH. Most are fragrant and will attract pollinators. Slow growth rates, small or limited leaf drop. Minimal pinching or pruning is ideal for flower production. Azaleas on the Southwest foundation would be ideal. For safety, do not let any ground level plants obscure the windows. Better to be seen than obstructed (funauthorized entry).

From a fellow Mopar comrade.

North side: (AC unit is located)
Dwarf Rhododendrons with separate blooming intervals
Mountain laurel (some species are poisonous!)
Japanese Pieris
Dwarf Viburnum with separate blooming intervals
Mountain Cranberry

South & East side:
Dwarf Azaleas
Dwarf (true) Mugo Pine

wildstarblazer
09-12-2008, 02:01 PM
well it took a while but I have a plan idea for you. It might not be as good as some one who knows your zone and area better but this is what I came up with. There are not a whole lot of good foundation plants that I could think of that are evergreen. I used plants that are low maint. like yews but If i'm sure there are other nicer bushes but they are probably deciduous and more maint. required. Anyway, hope this helps you.

wildstarblazer
09-12-2008, 02:05 PM
this is the overhead shot. has pdf attached too.

PaperCutter
09-12-2008, 05:11 PM
What program did you use? That 3D view is really... not good. The perspective is kind of funky- it's like looking at your design in a funhouse mirror. Not commenting on your design, just the presentation tool.

agm
09-12-2008, 07:52 PM
He's only asking for a little insight and suggestions! Everyone is saying that they get paid for there work and they wouldn't give suggestions unless they get "paid" but, I am sure that most of you have asked questions for help or suggestions or something on this sight before! You all are telling him to basically pay for what he wants, so why don't you all pay for your questions or suggestions etc. Why don't you all go to a mechanic shop, or local dealer or whatever it may be for your answers and you all pay for it. I thought this sight was to help eachother out! Oh and by the way, I am no designer or landscape architect so no insight from me on what you are looking for.......SORRY! It just pisses me off when I read all these replies with everyone crying about "there services aren't free" and yet there on a forum that supposed to be to help eachother out.

wildstarblazer
09-12-2008, 08:31 PM
I think the photos look a little like a fun house mirror because of the angle I took the shots at. I wanted to fit it all in the shot with out having to take many small shots that would be more clear but would have been too many pictures. Plus I did it pretty quick not concentrating on perfection.

agm
09-12-2008, 09:36 PM
Right! But, this is his quote, "we could use some suggestions for some bushes around our house." He was just asking for suggestions not for any kind of design. Everyone here keeps saying that, and all he did was ask for was a suggestion, not a design!

redmax fan
09-12-2008, 10:13 PM
im gonna seriously disagree with the accepted way of landscaping homes . my first priority is the homes sturdiness / longevity / ease of maintenance . everything after that is minor . and all i see in putting plants next to buildings is maintenance / a mess of dirt kicking up on siding / plants growing onto siding and discoloring it / plants getting in way of repairing - maintaining building / plants and beds becoming insect nests . ide never do it .

ide pour a colored / stamped concrete out to about 3/4 feet all the way around building . then if want could maybe put some type decorations like concrete statues or something . bordered in stones that ide use something like preen on to keep weeds out would be my second option if couldnt afford concrete . that said i hate stones with them overflowing out of beds and or having weeds growing in them . but theyre better than a plant bed to me .

then any beds would be out at the least ten feet from building .
and i would never plant a tree within 100 feet of a building for fear of root damage or the mess they make with leaves / sticks / nuts / fruit / bark .
im completely focused on homes sturdiness and ease of maintenance !

wildstarblazer
09-13-2008, 01:06 PM
Right! But, this is his quote, "we could use some suggestions for some bushes around our house." He was just asking for suggestions not for any kind of design. Everyone here keeps saying that, and all he did was ask for was a suggestion, not a design!


Got ya!'''''

Tom B.
09-14-2008, 02:31 PM
I hope you're being facetious Redmax Fan.

redmax fan
09-14-2008, 02:54 PM
tom b , im completely serious . im focused on total efficiency with zero wasted time or material . and a society building homes like i plan has more time to do other things like exercise , instead of weeding beds or trimming bushes .
thusly leading to healthier people .

not to mention all the labor and materials put into landscaping that could be going into something else more important . this society and its ways are in need of a massive change .

georgiagrass
09-15-2008, 10:09 PM
im gonna seriously disagree with the accepted way of landscaping homes . my first priority is the homes sturdiness / longevity / ease of maintenance . everything after that is minor . and all i see in putting plants next to buildings is maintenance / a mess of dirt kicking up on siding / plants growing onto siding and discoloring it / plants getting in way of repairing - maintaining building / plants and beds becoming insect nests . ide never do it .

ide pour a colored / stamped concrete out to about 3/4 feet all the way around building . then if want could maybe put some type decorations like concrete statues or something . bordered in stones that ide use something like preen on to keep weeds out would be my second option if couldnt afford concrete . that said i hate stones with them overflowing out of beds and or having weeds growing in them . but theyre better than a plant bed to me .

then any beds would be out at the least ten feet from building .
and i would never plant a tree within 100 feet of a building for fear of root damage or the mess they make with leaves / sticks / nuts / fruit / bark .
im completely focused on homes sturdiness and ease of maintenance !


hahahahahahahahaha. Let me know how that marketing plan works for ya!

georgiagrass
09-15-2008, 10:14 PM
I'm a little surprised at some of the responses to the original post. As a couple of you have pointed out, all he asked for was a few suggestions. He's got more posts on here than almost all the responders combined. Since when is a little free advice so hard to part with for a member of this forum? I thought that's what Lawnsite is all about ....

Lawnworks
09-15-2008, 10:21 PM
im gonna seriously disagree with the accepted way of landscaping homes . my first priority is the homes sturdiness / longevity / ease of maintenance . everything after that is minor . and all i see in putting plants next to buildings is maintenance / a mess of dirt kicking up on siding / plants growing onto siding and discoloring it / plants getting in way of repairing - maintaining building / plants and beds becoming insect nests . ide never do it .

ide pour a colored / stamped concrete out to about 3/4 feet all the way around building . then if want could maybe put some type decorations like concrete statues or something . bordered in stones that ide use something like preen on to keep weeds out would be my second option if couldnt afford concrete . that said i hate stones with them overflowing out of beds and or having weeds growing in them . but theyre better than a plant bed to me .

then any beds would be out at the least ten feet from building .
and i would never plant a tree within 100 feet of a building for fear of root damage or the mess they make with leaves / sticks / nuts / fruit / bark .
im completely focused on homes sturdiness and ease of maintenance !

I take it you will have the ugliest house on the block! I love landscaping... I think it adds value to your house and when you are ready to sell it will sell quickly... as far as maintenance goes... who cares?? That is a perk of employing people... I get my grass cut and weeds pulled while I watch football.

dvlscape
09-16-2008, 02:43 PM
im gonna seriously disagree with the accepted way of landscaping homes . my first priority is the homes sturdiness / longevity / ease of maintenance . everything after that is minor . and all i see in putting plants next to buildings is maintenance / a mess of dirt kicking up on siding / plants growing onto siding and discoloring it / plants getting in way of repairing - maintaining building / plants and beds becoming insect nests . ide never do it .

ide pour a colored / stamped concrete out to about 3/4 feet all the way around building . then if want could maybe put some type decorations like concrete statues or something . bordered in stones that ide use something like preen on to keep weeds out would be my second option if couldnt afford concrete . that said i hate stones with them overflowing out of beds and or having weeds growing in them . but theyre better than a plant bed to me .

then any beds would be out at the least ten feet from building .
and i would never plant a tree within 100 feet of a building for fear of root damage or the mess they make with leaves / sticks / nuts / fruit / bark .
im completely focused on homes sturdiness and ease of maintenance !


Wow, please never come near my house or anybody I know or care about. This approach to landscaping is absurd. It sidesteps the main purposes of landscaping: Create shade on the South side in summer (increasing cooling efficiency), filter and slow cold winter winds(increasing heating efficiency), soften the look of boxy structures such as single family homes, the use of different colors, textures and scents throughout the site(increasing quality of life), Increase property value, the list goes on and on.

Properly designing and installing a landscape is challening and rewarding, not something to be scared of. A properly designed landscape by somebody that really knows what they are doing would take care of all the issues you have listed and not leave your house looking like an inefficient, tacky concrete paradise.