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greendoctor
08-19-2008, 02:13 PM
Attached is the walking boom that I use for turf and bare ground applications. I normally use AI nozzles in the boom. The next photo is the Solo 433 power sprayer and the 23L 7676-24 gun, with pressure regulator. That is what I use if the area is small or I am "spot treating". There is an XR Teejet fan tip on the end of the wand. Lastly, the double nozzles on a swivel are what I use for spraying shrubs, hedges, short trees and nursery stock. I have the discs from DCER-2 all the way up to DCER-8 and the matching cores. Cone angle, volume and hollow or solid cone patterns are all determined by which disc and core are installed. This set up sprays a very high pressure mist that penetrates dense foliage and due to the adjustable angle of the spray head, it is easy to spray under leaves.

yardprospraying
08-19-2008, 05:21 PM
Nice grass greendoc !!! Reminds me of what my yard used to look like until I moved into the country. Now I'm lucky to be able to mow our 8.5 acres once a week!! I still have my reel mower though, never know when I might put in a putting green!!

I really like the idea of a walking boom for bare ground applications. We do a lot of oil field tank batteries, and some of the dikes around the tanks range from 2ft.- 7ft. tall. It would make it very nice to be able to cover them with one swipe, instead of the normal waving of the gun back and forth. I have seen some home made ones that have wheels on them, but to me they could be a bit akward in tight areas.

Thats a nice powered bp sprayer too. I often thought I would like one of them when treating lawns with specialty chems like drive, sedgehammer, and revolver late in the season. Seems like you always have one of those yards that you pick up late in the season that is loaded with everything, and you just don't want to mix up a "hot cocktail" in the ride-on or skid.

John.

Hogjaw
08-20-2008, 03:58 PM
Very nice pictures!

Great designs.

Thanks for sharing.

greendoctor
08-21-2008, 04:06 AM
Does any one know what kind of grass that is. That is zoysia "El Toro", cut at 3/8" with a reel mower. This lawn has been on my program for 12 months straight. 1/2 lb N, 1/4 lb K + micronutrients every month. No pre-m, Dimension or Barricade is ever used on this lawn. Weeds are controlled by keeping the sod tight. There is no thatch because the lawn is always mowed at the correct height and with the correct type of mower.

Because the boom is made from PVC nipples, you could probably configure one that would allow you to spray the entire embankment from one side. I forgot to take a picture of what I use to treat ditchbanks or any other area that I can only walk on one side only. I do not like boomless nozzles for bare ground or lawn weed control. I am frequently applying potent herbicides that will destroy everything down wind, Think metsulfuron, Arsenal or Oust XP. I do not want any of that drifting off target.

That regulator I use allows me to set a pressure from 1-100PSI. There is no drift when spraying from the boom or single nozzle gun. BTW, the unregulated output from the Solo 433 is 425PSI. Because of this and the fact that no one thinks to put on a secondary regulator, most people understandably shy away from using this for lawns or herbicides. My Maruyama dealer told me, people have tried the MS074 and returned the machine because the unregulated pressure is too high. Everyone is used to the ****-poor output from a hand sprayer. I use either the Solo or a Maruyama MS074 for all of my applications. There are no properties I currently maintain that cannot be efficiently covered by one of the machines. One filling is just about 7 gallons or 7000 sq ft of coverage. This weekend, I am flying to one of the outer islands to spray a 3/4 acre lawn for another landscaper.

What you said about a hot tank mix is so true. I get lawns from hell on a regular basis. I am the last stop before a RoundUp and resod. The first time I treat a lawn, it has everything you can think of in it because proper weed management and fertilization were never done on the lawn. I would never put an MSMA, simazine, Image, 2,4-D and Banvel martini in a 200 gallon sprayer. That would be a colossal pain to wash out so it is safe to use on something other than a bermuda or zoysia lawn. My sprayers can be washed out on the lawn that I just treated as specified and required by the DOA. They do not like people loading or rinsing out sprayers anywhere other than the site of use allowed by the product label. Why? A place where mixing, loading and cleaning always is done can easily become a point source ground water contaminant site. The legacy left behind by the now defunct sugar and pineapple growers is sites leaching atrazine, simazine, bromacil, diuron and Velpar into the groundwater, all from their central mixing sites.

yardprospraying
08-21-2008, 12:44 PM
Wow, that is zoysia? Nice!! I have never seen it cut that low. Most of the zoysia lawns we treat are mowed to high. Do you think it is a more disease/drought tolerant turf than the dwarf bermuda's? I treat some riviera lawns, and they are extremely tight & dense. Not much weed competition in those lawns. I know there are different varieties of the zoysia, but we just don't see very much of it around here.

I agree about the boomless nozzles with bare ground control. We have to deal with quite a bit of wind, and a lot of the locations we spray are smack dab in the middle of a wheat field. That is a good idea to make the boom out of pvc, seems like it would be light weight and resistant to the bare ground chems. lasting a lot longer.

John.

greendoctor
08-21-2008, 01:53 PM
That is one of my pet peeves. When zoysia or bermuda is mowed high it gets thatchy or fluffy, then someone trying to push PC lawn care says "you are fertilizing too much." True, if you starve zoysia, it survives and does not grow more than an inch or two in 12 months. However that lawn is also the color of straw most of the time. I do not get paid to make a client's lawn to look like straw. I give a lawn enough N to maintain color and density and insist it is mowed correctly. The way most fine lawns in Hawaii ended up being zoysia is in the 1990's most of the bermuda developed Take all patch. Homeowners were forced to resod. I think hybrid bermuda is one of the most disease susceptible grasses. If it is not Take all, it is dollar spot or leaf spot infecting it.

I spray liquid fertilizer through my boom all the time. That stuff is corrosive. I think a bare ground mix cannot nearly be as bad. Note the threaded caps on the end. That way, I can flush out the boom completely. I remove the caps, push water through, then remove nozzles and screens to clean those, put water through the nozzle bodies as well. Never had a problem with cross contamination. My bare ground sites are not far from landscaped areas. One of them is in a nursery. I am treating the roads and walk paths going through the nursery. Remember that there is no such thing as a 0-5 MPH wind day here and I do not spray on the rare day it is dead calm due to the danger of vapor damage.

Hogjaw
08-21-2008, 07:25 PM
Notice quick coups on what appears to be both ends of supply line from on/off to boom...........do these connections ever rotate?



Attached is the walking boom that I use for turf and bare ground applications. I normally use AI nozzles in the boom. The next photo is the Solo 433 power sprayer and the 23L 7676-24 gun, with pressure regulator. That is what I use if the area is small or I am "spot treating". There is an XR Teejet fan tip on the end of the wand. Lastly, the double nozzles on a swivel are what I use for spraying shrubs, hedges, short trees and nursery stock. I have the discs from DCER-2 all the way up to DCER-8 and the matching cores. Cone angle, volume and hollow or solid cone patterns are all determined by which disc and core are installed. This set up sprays a very high pressure mist that penetrates dense foliage and due to the adjustable angle of the spray head, it is easy to spray under leaves.

greendoctor
08-22-2008, 01:33 AM
Yes they do allow the connections to swivel freely. It is good for the connection between the hose and the hand valve to prevent twisting of the hose. But what I forgot to shoot was the locking jig that I put on the boom to hold it fixed. This is no problem for my tree and shrub wand because I want to be able to twist it into position to spray under leaves or over into the new shoots.

ArTurf
10-21-2011, 12:31 PM
Attached is the walking boom that I use for turf and bare ground applications. I normally use AI nozzles in the boom. The next photo is the Solo 433 power sprayer and the 23L 7676-24 gun, with pressure regulator. That is what I use if the area is small or I am "spot treating". There is an XR Teejet fan tip on the end of the wand. Lastly, the double nozzles on a swivel are what I use for spraying shrubs, hedges, short trees and nursery stock. I have the discs from DCER-2 all the way up to DCER-8 and the matching cores. Cone angle, volume and hollow or solid cone patterns are all determined by which disc and core are installed. This set up sprays a very high pressure mist that penetrates dense foliage and due to the adjustable angle of the spray head, it is easy to spray under leaves.

GD
When you are blanket spraying with the boom how do you keep track and prevent missed spots or overlap?

greendoctor
10-21-2011, 02:23 PM
On lawns under 1/2 acre, it is easy for me to line up with the previous pass by looking for where the grass is wet from the spray. Anything big or tricky gets marker dye added to the tank.

Ric
10-21-2011, 07:50 PM
..

Green Doctor

I have a question about how you keep the boom at the same height as you walk across a half acre or more?? I have a very similar set up but attached to a Walker Lawn Mower.


BTW FYI the boom pictured is called a wet boom because the Support structure is also the tubing that carries the Spray solution to the nozzles which are directly attached to the boom structure. Dry Booms will have hoses attached to the support structure for transporting the spray solution to the nozzles which are attached to mounting braces that attached to the Boom structure.


..

greendoctor
10-22-2011, 01:25 AM
The top of my chemical resistant boots is about 18". So I hold the boom right below the top of the boot. It is also very seldom that I do a lawn over 1/2 acre on foot. Lawns 1 acre and above are done with a boom on the truck.

Ric
10-22-2011, 10:24 AM
Green Doctor

I have a lot of respect for your knowledge, But this is one place I have trouble agreeing with you. I would need some kind of height control. A set of wheels or something. But I do free hand a wand when pulling hose. I think the big differences is I apply 5 gal a thousand which gives me lots of wiggle room. I believe you are applying some where closer to ONE gallon per thousand with your set up.

AS for truck Boom sprayer, My soil is so sandy the truck would rut the turf. Add in our 55 inches of rain and it is Mud Bogging. But I have a older Toro Multi Pro off a Golf Course that I use for large properties. BTW it has a 25 GPM pump which is bigger than my D 30 on my Ant Spray Pick up truck. I have tried running a boom-less nozzle off the D 30 and was unhappy with the results. I like a lot of Carrier and the D 30 doesn't put out enough volume to keep me happy.

But as I told Larry in an other thread, Equipment choice is a matter of opinion and any thing that works is good to go and not wrong.



BTW in Florida Heat I use 6 inch high spray boots and still change Soaks several times a day.

RAlmaroad
10-22-2011, 11:16 AM
Ric: I have the same setup as Greendoctor; just a smaller tank. The walking boom covers 5' on mine. Me thinks that just practice, practice and more perfect practice doing it correctly every time makes the use permanent. Very seldom use anything else unless its a tractor; then as you said keeping it uniform on the back of the tractor with stationary holders is mandatory. The walking speed was somewhat a concern in the beginning and using a watch to keep pace helped until I knew how fast to walk. It takes longer to mix than spray and using these things around flower bed, trees, or foundation plantings is a nonn-issue. My walking speed is 1 minute 30 second for each thousand square feet; and still use a marking fluid. However I do like to spray very early in the morning when the sprinkler system has done its work and can see the footprint on the grass which is almost as good as the marking fluid. Greendoctor has a zen thing for these matters and can almost float 16" above the ground.

ArTurf
02-14-2012, 12:12 PM
Ric: I have the same setup as Greendoctor; just a smaller tank. The walking boom covers 5' on mine. Me thinks that just practice, practice and more perfect practice doing it correctly every time makes the use permanent. Very seldom use anything else unless its a tractor; then as you said keeping it uniform on the back of the tractor with stationary holders is mandatory. The walking speed was somewhat a concern in the beginning and using a watch to keep pace helped until I knew how fast to walk. It takes longer to mix than spray and using these things around flower bed, trees, or foundation plantings is a nonn-issue. My walking speed is 1 minute 30 second for each thousand square feet; and still use a marking fluid. However I do like to spray very early in the morning when the sprinkler system has done its work and can see the footprint on the grass which is almost as good as the marking fluid. Greendoctor has a zen thing for these matters and can almost float 16" above the ground.

Can you give the specifics of your boom setup. Is it a 3 nozzle setup, which nozzles, what psi & etc.

RAlmaroad
02-14-2012, 01:53 PM
Just like in photo--5' with T-Jet bodies and Air Induction tips. I have three sets of different outputs. Pressure depends on fertilize or Fungicide. Fertilizer which is a much heavier mix is put down at 4000-45 PSIG and AI Tip to give 3.5GPM. Fungicides are put down at 80PSIG with finer tip to give me an application of 4.5GPM. The AI tips come is ceramic, SS or Plastic. I use the SS.

ArTurf
02-17-2012, 07:33 AM
I have the boom part figured out from the tee on.

Do you use the same gun, regulator & extension on the shrub setup for the boom? I am guessing the shrub nozzle quick-disconnects at the end of the extension and then you connect the boom on?

Do you think a non-motorized backpack would create enough pressure for 3 nozzles to put out 1/2 gal per K?

RAlmaroad
02-17-2012, 08:20 AM
[QUOTE=ArTurf;4314881]I have the boom part figured out from the tee on.

Do you use the same gun, regulator & extension on the shrub setup for the boom? I am guessing the shrub nozzle quick-disconnects at the end of the extension and then you connect the boom on?

Do you think a non-motorized backpack would create enough pressure for 3 nozzles to put out 1/2 gal per K?


My shrub work is so minimal that I use a watering can to fertilize them, and my back pack for insecticides.
I do not think you could keep up enough pressure with a hand powered back pack with three nozzles drawing from the tank.

greendoctor
02-17-2012, 01:11 PM
I have the boom part figured out from the tee on.

Do you use the same gun, regulator & extension on the shrub setup for the boom? I am guessing the shrub nozzle quick-disconnects at the end of the extension and then you connect the boom on?

Do you think a non-motorized backpack would create enough pressure for 3 nozzles to put out 1/2 gal per K?

No, different gun and extension for the twin nozzles, but same regulator. I once tried running 3 nozzles from a manual backpack. The only nozzles that would work were too fine and diffused to be practical for lawns. I had to use only 2 at a time. Even then, I would have to pump furiously trying to maintain pressure. This is why I appreciate the engine driven backpacks so much. They will maintain enough pressure to apply 1 gallon per 1000. Those AI nozzles that I like to use were designed to operate at pressures above what a manual sprayer can produce. Another point is how easy it is to just walk when there is no need to pump. Mind you that the machines typically hold up to 7 gallons. But I am really small and have no problems handling the weight.

ArTurf
02-17-2012, 01:36 PM
No, different gun and extension for the twin nozzles, but same regulator. I once tried running 3 nozzles from a manual backpack. The only nozzles that would work were too fine and diffused to be practical for lawns. I had to use only 2 at a time. Even then, I would have to pump furiously trying to maintain pressure. This is why I appreciate the engine driven backpacks so much. They will maintain enough pressure to apply 1 gallon per 1000. Those AI nozzles that I like to use were designed to operate at pressures above what a manual sprayer can produce. Another point is how easy it is to just walk when there is no need to pump. Mind you that the machines typically hold up to 7 gallons. But I am really small and have no problems handling the weight.

I thought I was about as small as they came until I saw where you mentioned how small you were. I'm 5'9" and around 150 lbs. A man's ability to do work is more about mental attitude than physical abilities. I'm sure you know many who are far physically stronger than you yet claim to not be able to perform tasks you do without blinking.

What pressures are you applying herbicide/fert? I think I read 40 or so in one of your posts.

7 gallons!! That's a pretty good load.

greendoctor
02-17-2012, 01:57 PM
I usually do not mix herbicides and fertilizers with the exception of soil active products such as Preemergents, simazine and Image. My postemergent and preemergent applications are applied at 40 PSI measured and regulated at the hand piece. Straight fertilizers, insecticides and fungicides are applied at up to 150 PSI. I am not guessing the pressure at the end of the hose.

I wish I were 5'9" and 150 lbs. All of my life I have had people treat me as if I am some kind of invalid. Even new customers get the idea that I am going to be sending a crew of people to do the work. Then they see me hiking up and down their lawn with the engine driven backpack or lifting 50 lb bags of fertilizers over my head to get them in the skid tank. You are right about people. I have had average to big people tell me that the backpack sprayer is so heavy and they do not know how I do it. Much less keep up all day long.

ArTurf
02-27-2012, 02:01 PM
No, different gun and extension for the twin nozzles, but same regulator. I once tried running 3 nozzles from a manual backpack. The only nozzles that would work were too fine and diffused to be practical for lawns. I had to use only 2 at a time. Even then, I would have to pump furiously trying to maintain pressure. This is why I appreciate the engine driven backpacks so much. They will maintain enough pressure to apply 1 gallon per 1000. Those AI nozzles that I like to use were designed to operate at pressures above what a manual sprayer can produce. Another point is how easy it is to just walk when there is no need to pump. Mind you that the machines typically hold up to 7 gallons. But I am really small and have no problems handling the weight.

What kind of pressure regulator are you using? Would a teejet #23120 work? It is somewhat difficult running down the parts since I do not have a store to work with. I must do everything through the internet and the places do not necessarily have knowledgeable people. I have seen where you buy things from Rittenhouse, any other suppliers you would suggest?

greendoctor
02-27-2012, 02:15 PM
The regulator I use now is a Watts 263 regulator. That teejet regulator would work only if you had a bypass line going all the way back to the tank unrestricted and if the incoming pressure did not exceed 150 PSI. You know, I had to order every single tool or device I need online and then build things myself. http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=332237&highlight=pressure+regulator I got this from an odd place after doing an online search. http://www.rvwaterfilterstore.com/PressureRegulators.htm So far it has held up extremely well for being used every day, all day. Get the one with the stainless steel screws and liquid filled gauge.

Rittenhouse and Dultmeier have been very good to me for supplying most of the sprayer hardware. An order placed at Rittenhouse put all of the pieces I needed to put together a skid sprayer on my door in about 5 days.

ArTurf
03-11-2012, 08:06 AM
I have bought the teejet dry boom nozzles bodies and AI tips. One thing I notice is when you turn the nozzle caps all the way down, the tips are not exactly parallel to the boom. You can turn them back a little and line them up but I would have thought they would have made them to line up automatically. Not a big problem just wondering.

cgaengineer
03-11-2012, 09:34 AM
Posted via Mobile Device

greendoctor
03-11-2012, 10:32 AM
They are supposed to not line up. Otherwise, the fan patterns would spray into each other at their point of overlap, causing distortion of the pattern.

cgaengineer
03-11-2012, 10:43 AM
Ever thought about putting wheels on your walking boom green?
Posted via Mobile Device

Ric
03-11-2012, 11:02 AM
Ever thought about putting wheels on your walking boom green?
Posted via Mobile Device

cga

I ask the same type of question above and was told they didn't need wheels or height control. Everyone has their own ideals on what is the best application equipment or method. I don't want to knock this one. But it sure doesn't impress me as something I want to try and I am a equipment freak.

.

greendoctor
03-11-2012, 11:03 AM
Yes I have. However, the boom is for precision application to areas that are not easily accessed by things on wheels. I am also most frequently running this boom from the engine drive backpacks because of the lack of access.

cgaengineer
03-11-2012, 11:14 AM
Yes I have. However, the boom is for precision application to areas that are not easily accessed by things on wheels. I am also most frequently running this boom from the engine drive backpacks because of the lack of access.

I was just thinking two front wheels from a mower...on the lawns pictured you could use skate wheels!
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cgaengineer
03-11-2012, 11:15 AM
cga

I ask the same type of question above and was told they didn't need wheels or height control. Everyone has their own ideals on what is the best application equipment or method. I don't want to knock this one. But it sure doesn't impress me as something I want to try and I am a equipment freak.

.

Post some pics of your setups...I'd like to see them...I love me some gadgets!
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greendoctor
03-11-2012, 11:16 AM
Not all of my lawns are at green height. I would need some huge wheels for the st augustine.

cgaengineer
03-11-2012, 11:20 AM
Not all of my lawns are at green height. I would need some huge wheels for the st augustine.

True...I am just thinking it would be difficult for me to maintain height and it would be pretty cool if it could roll. Of it works for you that's all that matters.

I'm getting ready to scalp my bermuda and top dress with sand this spring...can't wait to get my lawn back to reel mowing condition.
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greendoctor
03-11-2012, 11:48 AM
Many of the lawns I do are not the kind that something can easily be rolled to. I feel sorry for the mowing guys who have to 2 man carry a reel mower onto a lawn. This is what happens when everything is built on the side of a dormant volcano. Everything has some kind of extreme grade to it. My kneecaps are at 16", the height I prefer to spray at. So holding the boom at that height is alright. If we want to talk about not being able to maintain a height, I believe golf courses have it bad. They have to drive a boom over ground that has all manner of hills, mounds and valleys. The greens are the only flat ground. In order to keep height, their booms would have to articulate at 2' intervals.

Not too long ago, I power raked and deep verticut my bermuda at home. It has been raining for 2 weeks straight and the sun might not come out this week. The bermuda was growing well in February, now it looks bad. One of the hardest things to deal with is that it never gets cold enough for the grass to go dormant. But the grass can be deprived of sun for long periods of time. Last year was the worst. Even the sod growers had trouble.

Ric
03-11-2012, 12:31 PM
Post some pics of your setups...I'd like to see them...I love me some gadgets!
Posted via Mobile Device

cga

I don't want to steal the Spray Boom thread but here is a picture of my Fire Ant spray truck. I actually do enough Fire Ant Control to justify a second dedicated truck for Fire Ants as a one man band. This is a picture of my Chemical injector. I tank only clean potable fresh water and only mix by injecting the Insecticide right at the the hose reel.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v291/Ricyard/100_0060.jpg

This next Picture is my home made manifold for changing chemicals on the fly. A real advantage with injector systems. Chemical # 1 is the every day repellent insecticide that just about every one uses for Fire Ants here in Fla.

Chemical Two is a Ric Mix of NON REPELLENT INSECTICIDE AND A CAKE MIX. which acts like a bait to attract insects. This I will band spray on large properties for a more economic control.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v291/Ricyard/100_0058.jpg

.

cgaengineer
03-11-2012, 03:24 PM
Looks really good ric...I saw an injector system for a JD gun that I thought would be cool to have.
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cgaengineer
03-11-2012, 03:25 PM
Many of the lawns I do are not the kind that something can easily be rolled to. I feel sorry for the mowing guys who have to 2 man carry a reel mower onto a lawn. This is what happens when everything is built on the side of a dormant volcano. Everything has some kind of extreme grade to it. My kneecaps are at 16", the height I prefer to spray at. So holding the boom at that height is alright. If we want to talk about not being able to maintain a height, I believe golf courses have it bad. They have to drive a boom over ground that has all manner of hills, mounds and valleys. The greens are the only flat ground. In order to keep height, their booms would have to articulate at 2' intervals.

Not too long ago, I power raked and deep verticut my bermuda at home. It has been raining for 2 weeks straight and the sun might not come out this week. The bermuda was growing well in February, now it looks bad. One of the hardest things to deal with is that it never gets cold enough for the grass to go dormant. But the grass can be deprived of sun for long periods of time. Last year was the worst. Even the sod growers had trouble.

I just power raked mine today...a bit early but I want to injure the rye....I'll post pics this evening when complete.
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ArTurf
03-21-2012, 01:34 PM
GreenDoc
Do you mind posting a pic of the 3 nozzle boom hooked up to your Solo backpack with a clear view of the gun/regulator to boom connections.

greendoctor
03-21-2012, 01:51 PM
Sure can. Everything is on quick couplers. Take note that this assembly is also used on the end of my skid sprayer hose instead of a Chemlawn gun.

ArTurf
03-21-2012, 03:21 PM
I guess I was mainly interested in a close up of the gun to regulator connection not necessarily the quick couplers. And a pic of the whole setup connected together.

ELS Landscape
02-08-2013, 07:54 AM
That is one of my pet peeves. When zoysia or bermuda is mowed high it gets thatchy or fluffy, then someone trying to push PC lawn care says "you are fertilizing too much." True, if you starve zoysia, it survives and does not grow more than an inch or two in 12 months. However that lawn is also the color of straw most of the time. I do not get paid to make a client's lawn to look like straw. I give a lawn enough N to maintain color and density and insist it is mowed correctly. The way most fine lawns in Hawaii ended up being zoysia is in the 1990's most of the bermuda developed Take all patch. Homeowners were forced to resod. I think hybrid bermuda is one of the most disease susceptible grasses. If it is not Take all, it is dollar spot or leaf spot infecting it.

I spray liquid fertilizer through my boom all the time. That stuff is corrosive. I think a bare ground mix cannot nearly be as bad. Note the threaded caps on the end. That way, I can flush out the boom completely. I remove the caps, push water through, then remove nozzles and screens to clean those, put water through the nozzle bodies as well. Never had a problem with cross contamination. My bare ground sites are not far from landscaped areas. One of them is in a nursery. I am treating the roads and walk paths going through the nursery. Remember that there is no such thing as a 0-5 MPH wind day here and I do not spray on the rare day it is dead calm due to the danger of vapor damage.

What GPM are you using when you use this boom for the 1/2 N and 1/4 K ?

Been doing my home work. :laugh:

Sorry for dragging up an old thread

RAlmaroad
02-08-2013, 10:00 AM
What GPM are you using when you use this boom for the 1/2 N and 1/4 K ?

Been doing my home work. :laugh:

Sorry for dragging up an old thread



Calibrations are not in Gallons per minute but number of gallons per 1000sq. ft.
I generally apply 4 gallons of mix/1000sq ft. Select the proper tip to fulfill this at about 60PSIG (FERTILIZE) and higher for your herbicides at the trigger. So 100 gal tank will spray 25,000 square feet of turf with properly weighed fertilize.

ELS Landscape
02-08-2013, 01:44 PM
Calibrations are not in Gallons per minute but number of gallons per 1000sq. ft.
I generally apply 4 gallons of mix/1000sq ft. Select the proper tip to fulfill this at about 60PSIG (FERTILIZE) and higher for your herbicides at the trigger. So 100 gal tank will spray 25,000 square feet of turf with properly weighed fertilize.

My bad. I went back and got some more coffee:drinkup:

RAlmaroad
02-08-2013, 02:47 PM
Stuff Happens, it's winter, minds are coasting...not a problem. T-jet has a very wide variety of Air Induction Tips which have less drift so check those out also. Greendoctor got me on those and they are wonderful. For what it worth, I can walk with a 5' wide boom and cover 1K in 1minute and 35 seconds. Of course that a straight pass without dodging shrubs or flower beds. The good thing about walking booms is that you can be so precise around trees, flowers, etc.
Roy

ELS Landscape
02-08-2013, 03:15 PM
Stuff Happens, it's winter, minds are coasting...not a problem. T-jet has a very wide variety of Air Induction Tips which have less drift so check those out also. Greendoctor got me on those and they are wonderful. For what it worth, I can walk with a 5' wide boom and cover 1K in 1minute and 35 seconds. Of course that a straight pass without dodging shrubs or flower beds. The good thing about walking booms is that you can be so precise around trees, flowers, etc.
Roy

I think that is the way to go with the small lots I deal in. Walking boom and power back pack.
At least for weed control.

I like to see a larger volume of water. Particular since I toasted a few lawns late last season. I am crossing fingers they do come back.

greendoctor
02-09-2013, 02:36 AM
What GPM are you using when you use this boom for the 1/2 N and 1/4 K ?

Been doing my home work. :laugh:

Sorry for dragging up an old thread

I am using at least 2 gallons per 1000 sq ft. On small lawns I rather mix the fertilizer so that 7 gallons in the backpack covers 2000 sq ft. I also short cycle the irrigation following the application. On bigger lawns, I put on nozzles that can drop 5 gallons per 1000 and run from the skid sprayer. With the nozzle body system I use, I am not committed to one volume. That is the wonder of Quick Teejet nozzle bodies.

1/2 lb of N applied at 30 day intervals works just as well for me as 11/2-2 lb of N applied as granules at 60-90 day intervals. Lots of applications per year, yes. However, customers pay monthly and that monthly fee also covers weed control, disease control, and operation-adjustment of their irrigation system.

I have said many times that weed control takes on an entirely different dimension applied through a boom with fan nozzles VS a Chemlawn gun or single adjustable tip on a manual sprayer. There is a difference in product efficacy and safety to turf.