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BillyRgn
09-04-2008, 02:40 PM
i was looking for a test to give potential employees. just on basic safty, common sense, and some other stuff to prove they have experence and are not morons, if anyone has one or knows ware i can get one it would be greatly appreciated thanks billy

forestfireguy
09-06-2008, 06:47 PM
For as long as you'll spend looking you could probably do better making your own, totally custom to your needs.

mr.greenjeans
09-28-2008, 09:24 PM
Ok, the easiest way to test a new employee.

I used to work for another lawn guy before I went out on my own. In the morning we would give the new guy a brand new pair of safety glasses. Not a cheap clear pair but a nice pair of sunglasses. We would tell him they must be worn at all times when running equipment. Before the day was over, 9 out of 10 guys will have lost them or broke them. Some of them never took them out of the truck. I would then send the poor shmuck to weed wack. While rideing by on the mower I would see him trying to get dirt out of his eyes. I would point to the sunglasses on his head and he would put them on until he was done. This would happen at every job, all day. When we get back to the yard he was usually canned.
We went through seventeen guys in one year just trying to find one that would last.
If they can't keep a $10.00 pair of glasses on their face at the job and still have them at the end of the day they will not keep track of trimmers and blowers either. I can buy 50 pairs of glasses before I spend enough money to replace a back pack blower.
Good luck in your quest for "four eyes". In the mean time keep your own eyes on all your stuff cause chances are, your the only one who will

landscaper22
09-28-2008, 11:28 PM
Ok, the easiest way to test a new employee.

I used to work for another lawn guy before I went out on my own. In the morning we would give the new guy a brand new pair of safety glasses. Not a cheap clear pair but a nice pair of sunglasses. We would tell him they must be worn at all times when running equipment. Before the day was over, 9 out of 10 guys will have lost them or broke them. Some of them never took them out of the truck. I would then send the poor shmuck to weed wack. While rideing by on the mower I would see him trying to get dirt out of his eyes. I would point to the sunglasses on his head and he would put them on until he was done. This would happen at every job, all day. When we get back to the yard he was usually canned.
We went through seventeen guys in one year just trying to find one that would last.
If they can't keep a $10.00 pair of glasses on their face at the job and still have them at the end of the day they will not keep track of trimmers and blowers either. I can buy 50 pairs of glasses before I spend enough money to replace a back pack blower.
Good luck in your quest for "four eyes". In the mean time keep your own eyes on all your stuff cause chances are, your the only one who will

Yeah...Simply put, if employees can't follow basic directions don't waste your time trying to train them on doing good work, paying attention to details, or using care with equipment. It will never happen.
After going through a few employees you get to where you can tell within about 20-30 minutes of the first day of work if they will make it.

Amani
10-08-2008, 12:19 PM
All these are really good ideas I have been thinking of what to look out for when looking for new team members for my business.

JB1
10-08-2008, 06:17 PM
start with them walking a straight line.

prizeprop
10-08-2008, 07:03 PM
start with them walking a straight line.:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::lau gh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Scagguy
10-08-2008, 10:18 PM
My back yard borders a green belt. So, whenever I look at a prospective employee, I give him a weedeater and a pair of safety glasses and have him trim the fence line. One guy looked at the weedeater like it was the stragest thing he ever saw. ( supposedly had 2 years experience ) He couldn't figure out how to start it. Another guy was swinging it like nothing I had ever seen. Yet another said what's wrong with the height of the grass? It was only 8" tall. Yep....there are some real winners for ya.

Jenny Thomas
10-30-2008, 09:43 AM
I m jenny, some days ago I found a site Marketraise Corp (http://www.marketraise.com/). I find this very interesting because it is something related to the concept of virtual employees , where they allows us to keep a track on our works and also they are really very cost effective as compared to the real employees working for IT or software employees.
They offer different packages for projects depending upon the rate and work, it is really a nice. I have a regular requirement of employees for my projects and I had hired them for projects also. If my experience seems to be nice I will again share with you.

lawnart
10-30-2008, 11:46 AM
Now that's an idea...virtual employees!! :hammerhead:

hosejockey2002
10-30-2008, 05:20 PM
I m jenny, some days ago I found a site Marketraise Corp. I find this very interesting because it is something related to the concept of virtual employees , where they allows us to keep a track on our works and also they are really very cost effective as compared to the real employees working for IT or software employees.
They offer different packages for projects depending upon the rate and work, it is really a nice. I have a regular requirement of employees for my projects and I had hired them for projects also. If my experience seems to be nice I will again share with you.

I don't think this service would be very helpful to the green industry. Lawn maintenance is real work, requiring real (not virtual) people to do it. Employees can't just pretend to work like they can in the IT field. It would be funny, though, to hand a string trimmer to a typical IT geek and see if they could figure out how to start it. :laugh:

Amani
10-31-2008, 10:34 AM
I think you got me all wrong. I am looking for landscape employees.

zimmatic
11-01-2008, 08:12 AM
This next year I am going to do a group interview process.
1st advertise for the postioins, I.e local paper and internet.
2nd when they call I will ask for info such as name address etc. and tell them I am sending a form that tells them what to bring to the interview, also when and where it will take place,
3rd hold the interview. any person late even 1 minute or calling they are going to be late---gone
4th people who didnt bring the requested info such as references--gone
5th let them know it is a group interview letting them know they are competing against the other people there. If they cant handle it---gone
All equipment will that I own will be displayed. If they cant identify what it is---gone
They will have the opportunity to opperate all the equipment if they cant ----gone.
These are some of the things I am going to do. I love the idea for safety glasses. I think I will move that into the beginging of the process, letting them know if they take them off they will be ---gone
I dont know how many people I will get but I fired 9 people this year, and I have to try someting different.

nemow
11-01-2008, 10:41 AM
This next year I am going to do a group interview process.
1st advertise for the postioins, I.e local paper and internet.
2nd when they call I will ask for info such as name address etc. and tell them I am sending a form that tells them what to bring to the interview, also when and where it will take place,
3rd hold the interview. any person late even 1 minute or calling they are going to be late---gone
4th people who didnt bring the requested info such as references--gone
5th let them know it is a group interview letting them know they are competing against the other people there. If they cant handle it---gone
All equipment will that I own will be displayed. If they cant identify what it is---gone
They will have the opportunity to opperate all the equipment if they cant ----gone.
These are some of the things I am going to do. I love the idea for safety glasses. I think I will move that into the beginging of the process, letting them know if they take them off they will be ---gone
I dont know how many people I will get but I fired 9 people this year, and I have to try someting different.

You may be very lonely next season.

MJS
11-28-2008, 11:41 PM
You may be very lonely next season.

:laugh: He might be. . .

Zimmatic, an important thing to consider is whether you as the company owner would jump through so many hoops for anything. . .

The only guys I could foresee passing your test would be very experienced = they want more $$$

Az Gardener
11-29-2008, 12:33 AM
I have tried everything listed above plus a few more here is what I have found... They must be able to follow directions so pick any task making a PBJ sandwich, changing a tire, raking leaves, or my favorite planting a flowerbed. Give them a written set of steps you want them to follow to achieve the desired results. Make sure the directions is how you would do it. You don't need to see they can accomplish the task you want to see they will follow simple written directions. You would be surprised how many can't even read. Here is mine, the bullets come out like a ? when I copy paste, sorry.

Gardener Field Test
This test is not to see how fast or how well you can plant flowers. The purpose of the test is to

1. See if you can follow simple direct directions.
2. Your attention to detail
3. The pace or rhythm of your work.

 First read through the directions completely before you begin

 Turn the soil to a depth of 6-8 inches

 Amend with compost, ¼ to 1/3 compost to soil ratio.

 Add Osmicote fertilizer to application rate on bag (bed is 10 sq. ft.) use your best guess as to weight of fertilizer.

 Turn in all amendments and grade out smooth removing any rocks, roots or other debris.

 Complete grading to be sure when you water in the flowers the water will soak in evenly and not run off. Use excess soil to build a berm around your bed..

 Plant 2 varieties of flowers with the taller ones in the back plant 4-6 inches on center in a diamond pattern

 If the root ball is root-bound gently loosen roots; lightly compact soil around the root-ball, top of root-ball should be barley covered with soil and at same level as grade.

 When complete dispose of all empty containers and be sure to remove all tags from plants.

 Clean area thoroughly and lightly top-dress bed with compost, finger rake to complete.

 Return tools to their original location

 Water flowers being cautious not to disturb roots of newly planted flowers.

topsites
11-29-2008, 02:59 AM
I am not unsympathetic to what you guys speak of but somewhere during the process there needs to exist a training program.
Obviously it doesn't get any more basic than handing someone a set of safety glasses and telling that person to wear them at
all times throughout the day, but beyond that one can not expect what one did not ask for.

An easy way out is if you are not hiring inexperience, but this should be stated on the classified ad or be addressed
at the latest over the telephone, save both a headache.

Peace

Tadams
11-29-2008, 11:35 AM
I am not unsympathetic to what you guys speak of but somewhere during the process there needs to exist a training program.
Obviously it doesn't get any more basic than handing someone a set of safety glasses and telling that person to wear them at
all times throughout the day, but beyond that one can not expect what one did not ask for.

An easy way out is if you are not hiring inexperience, but this should be stated on the classified ad or be addressed
at the latest over the telephone, save both a headache.

Peace

That's a good point to consider. I have hired guys that could do the work- just not how I wanted it done. They worked for a different company and they trained them their way. That way might be OK but everyone does thing differently. A training program would be a very good idea.

Az Gardener
11-29-2008, 12:49 PM
This is just a screening process to decide who to hire. If they can't or won't follow simple directions during an interview process you have little hope of them doing so once they have the job.

I have also done IQ tests in the past assuming if they pass a certain threshold they are smart enough to learn what I need to teach them. They need to have more than ability to learn they need to show a willingness to follow directions. I found that the more intelligent they were the less willing they were to follow my simple directions.

Obviously a training system must be in place after they are hired to teach them the way you want things done. For now the original question was

I was looking for a test to give potential employees.

I would suggest a simple training class before they ever go onto a job for the first time. The couple hours you would spend would be an excellent investment in the new employee and your business. People move faster when they are confident that they are doing things correctly.

txgrassguy
11-30-2008, 12:15 AM
Some interesting points made in these posts.
My perspective on employees is although they (the employees) are a necessary asspain, they needn't be as troublesome as some have found them to be.
My screening process is actually quite simple as it eliminates those potential employees which experience has shown to be less desirable.
My criteria is:
>18 years of age.
Must have a valid driver's license with a record copy of their driver's history, available by asking at a cost of $10.00 which the potential employee must pay.
Must pass a criminal background check, paid for by my company at a cost of $13.95.
Must pass a urinalysis, paid for by my company at a cost of $55.00 each.
Must have reliable transportation to the maintenance building.
I have found that of the potential employees whom respond to my advertisements for hire, fully 95% are eliminated by one aspect or another as outlined above.
No expensive training time is wasted, no equipment is damaged, either the potential employee is motivated to such a degree to be in compliance or they are not.

DLAWNS
11-30-2008, 02:27 AM
Some interesting points made in these posts.
My perspective on employees is although they (the employees) are a necessary asspain, they needn't be as troublesome as some have found them to be.
My screening process is actually quite simple as it eliminates those potential employees which experience has shown to be less desirable.
My criteria is:
>18 years of age.
Must have a valid driver's license with a record copy of their driver's history, available by asking at a cost of $10.00 which the potential employee must pay.
Must pass a criminal background check, paid for by my company at a cost of $13.95.
Must pass a urinalysis, paid for by my company at a cost of $55.00 each.
Must have reliable transportation to the maintenance building.
I have found that of the potential employees whom respond to my advertisements for hire, fully 95% are eliminated by one aspect or another as outlined above.
No expensive training time is wasted, no equipment is damaged, either the potential employee is motivated to such a degree to be in compliance or they are not.

Good points, but there are a lot of competent, nice, not doped up people out there that just aren't cut out for what we do. I'm not trying to be argumentative, just something that I've found. I do really like your screening process, though.

allinearth
11-30-2008, 09:08 AM
You don't need to see they can accomplish the task you want to see they will follow simple written directions. You would be surprised how many can't even read. Here is mine, the bullets come out like a ? when I copy paste, sorry.

Gardener Field Test
This test is not to see how fast or how well you can plant flowers. The purpose of the test is to

1. See if you can follow simple direct directions.
2. Your attention to detail
3. The pace or rhythm of your work.

 First read through the directions completely before you begin

 Turn the soil to a depth of 6-8 inches

 Amend with compost, ¼ to 1/3 compost to soil ratio.

 Add Osmicote fertilizer to application rate on bag (bed is 10 sq. ft.) use your best guess as to weight of fertilizer.

 Turn in all amendments and grade out smooth removing any rocks, roots or other debris.

 Complete grading to be sure when you water in the flowers the water will soak in evenly and not run off. Use excess soil to build a berm around your bed..

 Plant 2 varieties of flowers with the taller ones in the back plant 4-6 inches on center in a diamond pattern

 If the root ball is root-bound gently loosen roots; lightly compact soil around the root-ball, top of root-ball should be barley covered with soil and at same level as grade.

 When complete dispose of all empty containers and be sure to remove all tags from plants.

 Clean area thoroughly and lightly top-dress bed with compost, finger rake to complete.

 Return tools to their original location

 Water flowers being cautious not to disturb roots of newly planted flowers.[/QUOTE]
This is a great test. When I hire someone I really don't care if they have experience because I can teach them what I want them to know. What I want are employees that have the ability to learn and can follow directions. Big emphasis on follow directions because this is really lacking today. Employees can't seem to carry out the simplest thing. They leave something out causing a return visit. When I was in school I can remember the teachers always hounding us on following directions on assignments, etc. Where was everyone else?:confused: