PDA

View Full Version : Architectural Grade?


bmwsmity
09-16-2008, 03:08 PM
Okay, I've heard the term architectural grade before, but it seems to be used very loosely.

What exactly does this mean in reference to fixtures? Just more heavy-duty? What type of traits must be present to deem a fixture architectural grade?

Maybe a total neophyte question, but I hate not knowing the answer.

Thanks :drinkup:

JoeyD
09-16-2008, 04:36 PM
Our Odyssey and Signature Series lines would be good examples of architectural grade. Usually Architectural grade is something that is robust and durable. Some other examples of arch. grade lgiths would be HK, BK-Teka, and Vision 3.

http://www.uniquelighting.com/product_pages/od2.htm

http://www.uniquelighting.com/product_pages/Signature_Series.htm

Mike M
09-16-2008, 07:07 PM
In addition to what Joey said, I might also add the fixture should have a detailed specifications sheet, aka spec sheet or cut-sheet.

bmwsmity
09-16-2008, 07:08 PM
I figured that a brass fixture, such as one by Unique, would be considered arch. grade.

I suppose that there is no concrete definition for arch. grade, but that it is just a very durable fixture that will hold up to a lot of abuse?

irrig8r
09-16-2008, 07:55 PM
I'll bet James can find a textbook definition for us...

bmwsmity
09-16-2008, 08:00 PM
I'll bet James can find a textbook definition for us...

surprised he hasn't chimed in yet on this one lol...i figured he was probably the arch. grade KING! :canadaflag:

Mike M
09-16-2008, 08:01 PM
What's the matter, Gregg? Wikipedia run dry on this one? I thought you were the one that was gonna answer this question.:waving:

irrig8r
09-16-2008, 08:02 PM
I just Googled the term ("architectural grade" - definition), and besides the very strange fact THIS VERY THREAD turned up on the first page of search results, there was this link:

http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/(olh5vw45xubdhe55o3u3of45)/productDetails.aspx?SKU=3074408

...which seems to prove that it is a term that is INDEED used rather loosely...

irrig8r
09-16-2008, 08:22 PM
BTW, what's the diff. between "Architectural Grade" and "Specification Grade"?

Chris J
09-16-2008, 08:45 PM
surprised he hasn't chimed in yet on this one lol...i figured he was probably the arch. grade KING! :canadaflag:

He's on vacation in my neck of the woods. I'm sure he'll enlighten us when he returns. I hope he gets a bad sun-burn. :laugh:

bmwsmity
09-16-2008, 09:01 PM
He's on vacation in my neck of the woods. I'm sure he'll enlighten us when he returns. I hope he gets a bad sun-burn. :laugh:

lol..you're too much chris.

i thought he was on vacation....

my original confusion came from a search of the term coming up with a kichler 15384 (i think) as "architectural grade". dont get me wrong, i like this fixture, but it ain't no heavy duty fixture worthy of commercial use.

i suppose there is really no hard and fast rule determining arch. grade... just a general idea of what qualifies based on a professional's experience......

Mike M
09-16-2008, 09:08 PM
Even more interesting will be the day, coming soon, when each time Gregg Googles he gets himself quoting something.

Chris J
09-16-2008, 09:10 PM
I don't know, if your talking about the aluminum line I would agree. But their brass BBR line is pretty durable. But then again, any fixture installed in a commercial application would need to be mounted a bit differently than residential use. I'm thinking concrete bases for the stakes to go in to prevent vandalizm? I've done a few installs where I used gallon paint cans filled with cement to anchor the fixtures so they can't be easily pulled up by vandals. Of course I don't allow the wire to get into the cement so that replacement/repair is not an issue.

Chris J
09-16-2008, 09:15 PM
Mike check your PM.

JoeyD
09-17-2008, 09:42 AM
I would say that architectural grade and specification grade would be the same thing just 2 different phrases. I would add as someone did previously that Spec sheets and line art drawings are definitley a requirement for specification.

irrig8r
09-17-2008, 10:45 AM
delete...wrong thread

bmwsmity
09-17-2008, 10:49 AM
I would say that architectural grade and specification grade would be the same thing just 2 different phrases. I would add as someone did previously that Spec sheets and line art drawings are definitley a requirement for specification.

so what you are saying joey is that if i were to provide a design to a landscape architect/ regular architect, a spec sheet with drawings would be required normally...right?

thanks for all the input everyone :drinkup:

JoeyD
09-17-2008, 11:05 AM
so what you are saying joey is that if i were to provide a design to a landscape architect/ regular architect, a spec sheet with drawings would be required normally...right?

thanks for all the input everyone :drinkup:

usually yes in some form or another. The specifiers like to see the fixture specs on plan usually through a site like CADDETAILS.COM. They use the cut sheets and installation line art instructions in the plans. It is just a standard practice.

irrig8r
09-19-2008, 10:56 AM
There is another that has CAD details too. I found out Nightscaping uses it.

Seems to have a rigorous screening process to make sure you are really in the trade. (You have to list three trade references for instance.)

www.todl.com

David Gretzmier
09-19-2008, 08:08 PM
I think arch. grade is the same as heavy duty, super size, commercial duty, severe use, industrial grade, extra tough, heavy gauge steel, etc. they all can be thrown around and they have no real numbers that apply. can you imagine light bulbs or wire sizes being this way? heavy duty wire, extra bright bulbs, etc.