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treegal1
10-02-2008, 10:45 AM
does any one use calcinated lime and what does it cost in your area?????

green_mark
10-02-2008, 12:30 PM
We use calcium carbonate 'in our area referred as Barn Lime' which is a little dusty but the cost is about 2.50/bag laid in to our office in semi quantities only.

treegal1
10-02-2008, 12:52 PM
this is almost pure Calcium carbonate, with some other impurity's then??? the guy I have been talking to said its the same a quik lime.

any who some one just gave me 3000 tons of it and I wondered if it had any value???

wallzwallz
10-02-2008, 06:31 PM
Tree we have calcitic lime here, is this the same? I think it's $10-15/50lbs if you can find it.Aren't your soils calcium rich? In the right market, like up here, it's worth alot. Is it powder or pellet? I'm talking pellet.

green_mark
10-02-2008, 06:53 PM
this is almost pure Calcium carbonate, with some other impurity's then??? the guy I have been talking to said its the same a quik lime.

any who some one just gave me 3000 tons of it and I wondered if it had any value???

Quick lime is Calcium Oxide (CaO) and should be used with extreme care on soil. Quick lime will react quickly with water and form a calcium hydrate. However, if sufficient water isn't available, quick lime pulls water from plants, bacteria, fungi and other living organisms, which can lead to plant death.

Quick lime will also react with manures and nitrogen fertilizers, releasing the nitrogen as a gas before it can be absorbed by the roots.

treegal1
10-02-2008, 07:59 PM
it has ample water, I will find out more about it in the morning, it was a valuable commodity for citrus, then the citrus left and this guy no longer has a way to get rid of his waste stream. he said it went like this.
CaCO3 → CaO + CO2
CaO + H2O → Ca(OH)2
Ca(OH)2 + CO2 → CaCO3 + H2O

but that it had some (like less than 1%)
CaSO4∑2H2O

Elden
10-02-2008, 08:37 PM
Dido to green marks comment. I know some one who was using a form a quick lime in a hydro seed mix. well come to find out it created a crust on the surface of the soil. It threw the Ca/Mg ratio and the pH out of whack. I'd have to dig it out to give specifics but I posted them on here before. It formed a 1/4 inch crust on soild surface and basically choked out the guys bermuda.

JDUtah
10-02-2008, 08:53 PM
if only it could selectively kill Bermuda....

Keegan
10-02-2008, 09:18 PM
I've gotten calcitic lime from Lesco for about $5/ 50lbs.

DUSTYCEDAR
10-02-2008, 09:34 PM
i use it up here
if u can make pellets out of it you will have something
maby i could go to liquid?

treegal1
10-02-2008, 10:11 PM
pellets are harder to do than beads of the stuff, phill has already turned some into small beads about 1/8 inch, and they get hard after a quik bake and as soon as water hits it it falls apart, the thing of this stuff is that it is going to keep pileing up 3000 tons every month, and there second way to get rid of it is gone as the land fill that used to take it is all capped up and is going to be a golf course soon, next stop my place or farther, I was going to take a sample to the usda in the am and some to a local fert co that we are freindly with and get the real story and all, then see if we can move the stuff with out a large to do.

dallen
10-11-2008, 02:50 PM
Quick lime, or hydrated lime, is regular limestone that has been calcined in a rotary drum at something like 3,000 degrees f. This removes a hydrogen molecule. When exposed to moisture, the material becomes re-hydrated. Heat is a by-product of the re-hydration process. Nasty stuff. Get quick lime on your skin or in your eyes, and you will regret it. I don't see how this material could be applied to any soil. I once poured 1/2 of a five gallon bucket of water into another five gallon bucket that was 1/2 filled with hydrated lime. The mixture stated to boil and reminded me of certain mud pits in Yellowstone. It doubled in volume and the bucket promptly melted. Anyone ever use Nutralime pelletized limestone, or Nutrasoft pelletized gypsum?

JDUtah
10-11-2008, 03:30 PM
Off topic kind of.. but I have a question... when does our 'involvment' with a product get to changing it's characteristic so much that it can no longer be considered "organic" or "natural"? Wouldn't the reaction that takes place at 3,000 degrees F cause it to now be considered 'synthetic'?

Might not be an answerable question, but I was just wondering...

DeepGreenLawn
10-11-2008, 04:25 PM
http://www.calcinedlime.com/use.htm

here is a site with a whole list of different uses for the stuff... if you can't use it maybe someone nearby can?

treegal1
10-11-2008, 04:52 PM
welll, this stuf was nasty at the start from what I have seen and read, by its been spent in a water treatment facility, most of the time it has to get dumped with the metals and all, this one site is metal free and the Ca is no longer a harm or caustic. Its spent!!! it will act as a good lime, so far I am going to use it as a road and a berm system for run off reasons, and yes I got stuff that will grow on it just fine.

hobbsd
10-22-2008, 02:30 PM
this is almost pure Calcium carbonate, with some other impurity's then??? the guy I have been talking to said its the same a quik lime.

any who some one just gave me 3000 tons of it and I wondered if it had any value???

3000 tons????????? thats like an entire train's worth where do you warehouse 3000 pallets of lime?

treegal1
10-22-2008, 03:57 PM
3000 tons????????? thats like an entire train's worth where do you warehouse 3000 pallets of lime?its 2 train cars, we just pulled then into the yard on the spur.

DUSTYCEDAR
10-22-2008, 09:33 PM
she has spurs:dancing: