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lone wolf
10-09-2008, 06:38 PM
I am a solo operator with a decent customer base, mixed with 1 time maintenance people. My question is instead of taking 5 yards of clippings and leaves to the dump, I was thinking of making a nice fenced in area in my back yard. It is legal to do that in my city. But I was wondering about the smell, and how long before I can use the compost, and how often do I need to turn it, or do I even need to turn it?

ICT Bill
10-09-2008, 09:46 PM
Lone
Excellent questions, you will have to check with your local folks in government to figure out the first question

As soon as the pile smells it should be turned, proper composting does not have a smell unless there is a lot of nitrogen in the mix which can turn it anaerobic very quickly

Look here, great source of information http://www.compostingcouncil.org/

Prolawnservice
10-10-2008, 09:03 AM
You'll have to look up you own regulations but here is some of what we have in NJ

For further information on obtaining a permit or approval for composting facilities, please contact the NJDEPE/DSWM, Bureau of Resource Recovery Engineering. A pre-application meeting is strongly recommended. Composting facilities also must be incorporated into the district solid waste management plan. Please contact your county Solid Waste Management Office (Appendix D) for further information on including your composting facility in your district's plan.

Backyard composting activities do not require a permit or approval from the NJDEPE provided that they are limited to the composting of family waste on the premises of one or two family dwellings.

C. Area Requirement

A minimum of an acre per 3000-3500 cubic yards of leaves collected is required for the actual composting operation. This assumes the use of the low or intermediate level technology described later, and is in addition to the requirement for a buffer zone (see Table 1). Calculation of site capacity is shown in Appendix A.

Use of the intermediate level of technology may require additional space, since smaller windrows are needed to accommodate many turning machines. However, this must be determined individually for the type of equipment chosen. Windrows often can be assumed to have the approximate cross-sectional shape of a semi-circle. Necessary aisle space depends again on the type of equipment used.

D. Buffer Zone

A buffer zone is required between the site activities and neighboring land use to minimize possible odor, noise, dust and visual impacts. Other than "the larger the better", it is difficult to generalize exact buffer zone requirements for composting. It would seem prudent to provide at least 50 feet between the composting operation and the property line. At least 150 feet must be allowed between composting activities and any sensitive neighboring land uses, such as residential property lines. Additionally, at least a 250 foot buffer is needed between composting activities and a place of human occupancy (house, school, etc.). If grass clippings will be brought to the site, at least 1000 foot buffer zones from the staging and grass clipping handling areas are probably necessary (see Section VI). Calculations of area requirements for buffer zones are shown in Appendix A.

The buffer zone may include a berm (often of finished compost) to serve as a visual barrier, help control vehicular access, and reduce noise levels off-site. A landscaping plan, including plantings, is strongly recommended to enhance the appearance of the facility.

Bunch of bureaucratic crap if you ask me:dizzy:

Smallaxe
10-10-2008, 09:09 AM
I just emptied the truck on the garden and let the pile sit until midsummer when I tilled it all up and used it. It was mostly leaves with some grass clippings.
Note: If your local gov't requires you to have a permit to do a compost pile in your yard, it might be time for America to, grow a couple and, throw the Fascists into the streets b4 they do it to us.

ICT Bill
10-10-2008, 10:18 AM
I just emptied the truck on the garden and let the pile sit until midsummer when I tilled it all up and used it. It was mostly leaves with some grass clippings.
Note: If your local gov't requires you to have a permit to do a compost pile in your yard, it might be time for America to, grow a couple and, throw the Fascists into the streets b4 they do it to us.

I do believe the question was aimed at large scale composting, not your backyard

treegal1
10-10-2008, 12:08 PM
You'll have to look up you own regulations but here is some of what we have in NJ

For further information on obtaining a permit or approval for composting facilities, please contact the NJDEPE/DSWM, Bureau of Resource Recovery Engineering. A pre-application meeting is strongly recommended. Composting facilities also must be incorporated into the district solid waste management plan. Please contact your county Solid Waste Management Office (Appendix D) for further information on including your composting facility in your district's plan.

Backyard composting activities do not require a permit or approval from the NJDEPE provided that they are limited to the composting of family waste on the premises of one or two family dwellings.

C. Area Requirement

A minimum of an acre per 3000-3500 cubic yards of leaves collected is required for the actual composting operation. This assumes the use of the low or intermediate level technology described later, and is in addition to the requirement for a buffer zone (see Table 1). Calculation of site capacity is shown in Appendix A.

Use of the intermediate level of technology may require additional space, since smaller windrows are needed to accommodate many turning machines. However, this must be determined individually for the type of equipment chosen. Windrows often can be assumed to have the approximate cross-sectional shape of a semi-circle. Necessary aisle space depends again on the type of equipment used.

D. Buffer Zone

A buffer zone is required between the site activities and neighboring land use to minimize possible odor, noise, dust and visual impacts. Other than "the larger the better", it is difficult to generalize exact buffer zone requirements for composting. It would seem prudent to provide at least 50 feet between the composting operation and the property line. At least 150 feet must be allowed between composting activities and any sensitive neighboring land uses, such as residential property lines. Additionally, at least a 250 foot buffer is needed between composting activities and a place of human occupancy (house, school, etc.). If grass clippings will be brought to the site, at least 1000 foot buffer zones from the staging and grass clipping handling areas are probably necessary (see Section VI). Calculations of area requirements for buffer zones are shown in Appendix A.

The buffer zone may include a berm (often of finished compost) to serve as a visual barrier, help control vehicular access, and reduce noise levels off-site. A landscaping plan, including plantings, is strongly recommended to enhance the appearance of the facility.

Bunch of bureaucratic crap if you ask me:dizzy:

I dont see the indoor closed system regs in there????? do they have a tons limit on IVC systems??? do you need a rope to hang yourself with, those bastards, what are they thinking, its not like hazmat or anything?? or is it, the garden state???? how about the bureaucrat's state???

treegal1
10-10-2008, 12:15 PM
in my area its pay the fee's and dont run anything of into the ground!! test it a few times a year, keep a note book with time date and temps for inspection and reporting, its just the same old run around> sit jump stay sit jump roll over beg, and pay every step off the way, few$$$ here few more over there$$$ SOME IN THE MIDDLE, join this, report that..... call the state and send them a check, and then another check or 10 and your in the game, just like in pro's area call them first and tell them what you want to do then they send out a compliance officer to figure out how they can best bend you over and rape you, after that its just a matter of giving them you life's saving and a pint of blood

Prolawnservice
10-10-2008, 01:41 PM
http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/rrr/composting/live.htm

composting regulations by state

treegal1
10-10-2008, 02:48 PM
I just emptied the truck on the garden and let the pile sit until midsummer when I tilled it all up and used it. It was mostly leaves with some grass clippings.
Note: If your local gov't requires you to have a permit to do a compost pile in your yard, it might be time for America to, grow a couple and, throw the Fascists into the streets b4 they do it to us.thats so waste-full we just need to compost them.LOLOL

Smallaxe
10-11-2008, 08:56 AM
I do believe the question was aimed at large scale composting, not your backyard

Why would you believe that? Wasn't the original question relating to the SMELL specifically? Mention of a nice fenced enclosure? and I think the word 'backyard' was actually written into the question, though perhaps METAPHORICALLY :laugh:

DUSTYCEDAR
10-13-2008, 11:25 PM
turn it wet it keeps the smell down