PDA

View Full Version : Garden wall help please


TPS
10-17-2008, 07:22 PM
Can someone give me the basics of a simple garden wall? Only need about a foot high. Is it all just dry stacked? Also, is renting a saw the easiest and cheapest way to cut the block. Just using cheap block from home depot or lowes on this one to learn. Thanks in advance.

cgll1135
10-17-2008, 08:44 PM
what do you mean by a "garden" wall?

TPS
10-17-2008, 09:14 PM
Just a basic wall bordering a garden. Similiar to a very small retaining wall, but will not be holding back weight or have any structual purpose. Just for cosmetics. Like edging, but out of wall block about a foot high, 3 rows or so.

Supertiger
10-20-2008, 08:46 AM
ya just rent a diamond blade saw it works fine, Yes all the rows are dry stacked but the cap stones are glued on.
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l284/supertigre/landscape%20jobs/100_0696.jpg

Dreams To Designs
10-20-2008, 10:38 AM
TPS, it depends on the wall block you are using as to the correct installation procedure. The important part is a well compacted level base. The block can be dry stacked or glued and looks especially nice if a cap is installed to finish off the look. If you need to set the wall for grade differences, you must also step the base to keep the wall level.

The blocks can be cut with a hammer and chisel, or any type of saw with a masonry or diamond blade. A gas powered cutoff saw with a diamond blade will make quick work of any cuts, but it will cost you a rental fee for the saw and the wear on the blade.

Kirk

TPS
10-20-2008, 05:38 PM
Thanks for the tips. It will all be one level, and only about 12' long on each side of the steps. Nothing nearly as big as what you have pictured. Any idea on the depth of the base for south jersey? Thanks again.

Dreams To Designs
10-20-2008, 06:33 PM
TPS< 6" deep, about a foot wide, with lot's of hand tamping. When you think you have done enough, do it one more time. I'm thinking you are not going to rent, or really need a plate compactor.

Check a local paver dealer. you maybe able to get a similar, but better product at a reasonable price.

Where in NJ are you?

Kirk

TPS
10-20-2008, 07:26 PM
Im in Camden county. I will compact by hand. It's a really small job and a first for me. Just want to do it right the first time. Thanks for all the advice.

Dreams To Designs
10-21-2008, 10:11 AM
TPS, I am also in Camden County. If you need any help or additional information, feel free to contact me.

It is important to follow the correct procedures, no matter how small or large the job is to be successful and sustainable. You may want to check with the folks at Hilltop Block on the Black Horse Pike for excellent product selection and good pricing. They will have all the materials you will need to perform a quality job.

Kirk

TPS
10-21-2008, 07:02 PM
Thanks for all the help dreams. Do you do installs as well? Or just designs? Thanks.

Dreams To Designs
10-21-2008, 07:06 PM
I create designs, project manage and teach installation techniques as well as an educator. I work with installers all over NJ, New York City and as far south as Baltimore.

Kirk

TPS
10-21-2008, 07:22 PM
Know any good affordable classes I can take? I tried CC Vo Tech, but they never have enough people for a class.

Dreams To Designs
10-21-2008, 07:28 PM
That all depends on what you need to learn and what you consider to be affordable. The program at CCVTS is not very professionally oriented. Unfortunately South Jersey lacks any good landscaping programs. There is a full program at Cumberland County College for an associates degree or there are the short courses held at Rutgers in New Brunswick during the winter. The Rutgers classes are geared towards professional installers and designers.

What information are you looking for?

http://www.cpe.rutgers.edu/programs/landscape.html

Kirk

TPS
10-21-2008, 10:31 PM
I would like to get into hardscaping next year. I'm not looking for another degree. Just looking to learn above what I can learn from this site. Thank you for all your help. I am going to read up on the Rutgers programs.

CALandscapes
10-22-2008, 12:07 AM
Ever hear of using mason's sand between the compacted stone base and the blocks in order to achieve a perfect level?

Dreams To Designs
10-22-2008, 10:40 AM
We use concrete sand, which is more coarse than masons sand. Masons sand is to fine and will not create interlock or can be washed out from under the block. Have also used stone dust to achieve the same effect. When you use sand, you are able to pound down and level a section of the base coarse of wall stones at one time, rather than individually. I prefer to go as thin a layer as possible, but know many installers and engineers that go with a 1" layer of sand to ease in leveling.

Kirk