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Junior M
10-22-2008, 06:36 PM
Ok, so I am not sure if this is the right place to post this but you guys know me alot better than most on here so I am going to post it here...

A guy that did backhoe work and hauled dirt, gravel and stuff like that was killed working on a bush hog tuesday.. Thats really all I can say.. That sums it up.. I am not sure how to post a link but if you want to read the article go to www.thestate.com/local/ and then find the article named "Blythewood man crushed in accident"

The guy was only 25, and he was super nice, when he was waiting on his truck to be loaded or something and you were digging grade and you went to get off the machine to check the grade, he would come over and check it for you, numerous times he grabbed a shovel to help us spread the gravel out on the pool bottom... Its just a shame, he was a really good guy with a promising business, He would bend over backwards to help you when you really needed it...

That happening puts life in to perspective, he was doing a simple task of sharpening the blades on his bush hog, thats what I was told, and the jack collapsed, just a simple accident that couldnt have been helped, I and I know many other who have done alot more hazardous tasks and have never been harmed and yet he was hurt.. I have never had something like this happen and I dont really know how to handle it.. I am not totally sure why I am posting this, I guess I am hoping its as big of an eye opener to be safer as it was to me...

bobcat_ron
10-22-2008, 06:42 PM
That's brutal, anytime I am near anything that weighs more than me I am always thinking twice.
You can be snuffed out at a moment's notice, and you wouldn't even know death is coming.

YellowDogSVC
10-22-2008, 06:49 PM
I'm sorry to hear about the loss of your friend. Not sure what happened to the jacks but it's a reminder not to work under anything including boom arms without really good supports. Just hug your folks and if you are a parent hug your kids because you never know what the next day will bring. Accidents can and do happen and it's always tragic.

KCfireman
10-22-2008, 07:13 PM
happens all the time here in KS. Famers w/ open-air cabs that brush hog sometimes hit big ruts which cause them to fall off the mower goes right over them. Very sad.

Junior M
10-22-2008, 07:16 PM
happens all the time here in KS. Famers w/ open-air cabs that brush hog sometimes hit big ruts which cause them to fall off the mower goes right over them. Very sad.
Thats just gory (spelling?) I am not even sure what to say about this whole situation...

ianh
10-22-2008, 07:24 PM
Sorry to hear about your friend.

All I can offer you are the words of Ray Charles that I always keep in the back of my mind: "You better live every day like it's your last day, 'cause one day you're gonna be right."

pclawncare
10-22-2008, 07:32 PM
about 2 months ago they dont know what exactly happened it was speculated he may have passed out from heat but a guy was disking a field and fell off the tractor and the impliment ran over him i cant even imagin what that was like when people arived on the scene it couldnt have been anything resembling a human

Junior M
10-22-2008, 07:38 PM
about 2 months ago they dont know what exactly happened it was speculated he may have passed out from heat but a guy was disking a field and fell off the tractor and the impliment ran over him i cant even imagin what that was like when people arived on the scene it couldnt have been anything resembling a human
I have seen a deer that was ran over by a disk, not the prettiest sight before the disk inncident, it was really bad after, Tractors seem to be the worst for falling off and getting hurt...

CAT powered
10-22-2008, 07:44 PM
Get a closed station machine and you're ok.

Old letter series tractors aren't very safe. They're a blast, but they aren't very safe. I've got a Farmall M and the seat is directly above the drawbar and it is made of slippery steel and it's got no back to it. If you dumped the clutch real hard without a tight grip on the wheel you could easily slide off the back of the seat.

Dirtman2007
10-22-2008, 07:45 PM
Accidents can happen so easy on the jobsite. I managed to chop the end of one of my toes off over the summer removing the root rake from the skid steer. Just doing a normal task, pulled up the two release pins and for some reason it just slipped down off the mounts and toppled over onto me, I was able to get everything out of the way except for my right foot. One of those rake tines landed right on it and goodbye toe nail and end of toe:cry:

The biggest close call that I've had that could have put me 6' under was cutting a tree up for logs. I had already pushed the tree over with the excavator and drug it out of the stump hole. It was probably a 18" diameter, 80' pine tree. Well I was cutting the stump off and as soon as the cut went all the way through the entire log flung back launching me and the chainsaw back about 6-7' and then the log landed right on my legs pinning me to the ground. Thank god I had my helper on the site with me and he was able to run to the machine and grab a shovel to dig my legs out from under the log and get me out.
For some miracle, my grandpa must have been looking out for me, I did not even get a scratch. Now I my legs felt like they had been run over by a truck, but I came out blood free. I can still remember that moment to the day.

I'm only 21, Guess I need to take it easy if I want to make it to 30:dizzy:

Junior M
10-22-2008, 07:52 PM
Get a closed station machine and you're ok.

Old letter series tractors aren't very safe. They're a blast, but they aren't very safe. I've got a Farmall M and the seat is directly above the drawbar and it is made of slippery steel and it's got no back to it. If you dumped the clutch real hard without a tight grip on the wheel you could easily slide off the back of the seat.
Yeah, anything with a closed cab is relatively safe, but the older tractors are the most dangerous, especially the old John Deere D's, I know a few people in Ohio who owned them and they sat down on the seat and snap the flat bar holding the seat on snapped because they didnt replace it when they restored the tractor, even though it was pitted with rust and looked like it wouldnt hold the wieght of a twig..

Dirtman I would agree with you, you need to slow down if your going to make it to 30! :laugh: The worst thing I ever had happen to me was hauling brush on the 190 and I was pushing into the pile and a little tiny tree barley a half inch across come back and hit me right in the crotch... Never thought I would have to wear a cup on a skid ;)

Dirtman2007
10-22-2008, 07:57 PM
The worst thing I ever had happen to me was hauling brush on the 190 and I was pushing into the pile and a little tiny tree barley a half inch across come back and hit me right in the crotch... Never thought I would have to wear a cup on a skid ;)

That's Why I have a cab!

And the windsheild has some battle scars on it too!

Junior M
10-22-2008, 08:00 PM
That's Why I have a cab!

And the windsheild has some battle scars on it too!
Yeah, but they dont rent cabs on short term rentals!! I sure wish they did!! :laugh:

Scag48
10-22-2008, 08:12 PM
You're right Jr., it really does put life into perspective. It's good for you to realize that this isn't all fun and games as much as we'd like to think. A guy I knew was killed running an excavator last year. Wasn't wearing his seatbelt, rolled the machine over and after he was tossed out the machine landed on him. It always sucks to hear these stories, but that's the nature of the beast.

I've pulled a few risky moves here and there, a few things that were on the edge. Slopes are the most dangerous when it comes to running equipment, IMO. It's just so easy to lay a machine over it's not even funny, even if you're going straight up and down and think you've got it made. Last day on the job I pulled a 400 out of a hole I had finished roughing in the floor, all the way up a 1:1. Really humbles you to be a little scared, the adrenaline was running pretty good there coming out. I've been on a lot of slopes, but I can't recall the last, true 1:1 I was on, let alone in a 400. I think that needs to be taken into account as well. I don't consider myself a veteran in a 40 ton hoe, I was puckered up pretty good climbing out of the hole as I haven't really taken anything larger than a 120 into situations like that. I think those kinds of situations a guy has to be especially careful, running equipment he's not overly accumstomed to in situations that are less than ideal.

Junior M
10-22-2008, 08:24 PM
You're right Jr., it really does put life into perspective. It's good for you to realize that this isn't all fun and games as much as we'd like to think. A guy I knew was killed running an excavator last year. Wasn't wearing his seatbelt, rolled the machine over and after he was tossed out the machine landed on him. It always sucks to hear these stories, but that's the nature of the beast.

I've pulled a few risky moves here and there, a few things that were on the edge. Slopes are the most dangerous when it comes to running equipment, IMO. It's just so easy to lay a machine over it's not even funny, even if you're going straight up and down and think you've got it made. Last day on the job I pulled a 400 out of a hole I had finished roughing in the floor, all the way up a 1:1. Really humbles you to be a little scared, the adrenaline was running pretty good there coming out. I've been on a lot of slopes, but I can't recall the last, true 1:1 I was on, let alone in a 400. I think that needs to be taken into account as well. I don't consider myself a veteran in a 40 ton hoe, I was puckered up pretty good climbing out of the hole as I haven't really taken anything larger than a 120 into situations like that. I think those kinds of situations a guy has to be especially careful, running equipment he's not overly accumstomed to in situations that are less than ideal.
I havent had much experience on slopes, the most I had was setting beside a 4ft tall retaining wall about 2ft from the rip rap on the lake, running the 430 throwing dirt over the wall and I was finding chunks of concrete and the 430 struggled a little bit just getting it up and I swung around over top of the wall and I stopped the machine where I was piling the concrete, the slop in the turn table kept me going and I had the track off of the ground when I finally got backover the pile and dropped the chunk, now mind this was a pretty steep slope anyways, the pool was 14 wide with 5 foot of concrete on one side and 2 on the other, and they set the pool up as high as they could so the top of the wall would be at the bottom of the step coming on to the pool deck.. So that lot was pretty steep...

I slid around on the side of that lot that hadnt been touched yet with an underpowered case 420ct in some nasty mud, that wasnt the funnest either, its hard to grade mud...

Like I said before I have never had someone I know personally pass away, that hurts enough, it hurts even more because he was doing what he loved, and he was in the same industry I am in or want to get into, thats the most eye opening part...

Scag48
10-22-2008, 08:41 PM
Competency is what kills you, that's the truth. The second you feel safe, you throw caution into the wind and that's when it bites you in the ass. I'm guilty of it in smaller excavators, I don't have any problems taking them just about anywhere, I'm used to it.

CAT powered
10-22-2008, 08:49 PM
Having a healthy fear/respect for a machine is a good thing. It's when you lose that fear/respect for what the machine can do that you get hurt. I have been bush hogging all my life. I was out bush hogging with a Farmall 544 one day not thinking of a whole lot. I hit the top of a rock. The top of the rock sheared off and flew out of the front, hitting me in the head. I received a considerable gash on my head. Being the idiot I am I didn't go to the hospital until after dinner and even then it was only because the wife was yelling at me to go. I ended up with 2 surgical staples in my head and a bump there to remind me of that incident for the rest of my life. I also had a truck roll over on me for the first time this year. I got comfortable with where I was dumping and didn't notice how far I was leaning. I got the box up all the way and over the truck went.

Junior M
10-22-2008, 08:50 PM
Competency is what kills you, that's the truth. The second you feel safe, you throw caution into the wind and that's when it bites you in the ass. I'm guilty of it in smaller excavators, I don't have any problems taking them just about anywhere, I'm used to it.
Yeah, I had just got comfortable working on that grade and trying to dump the dirt in the 3 foot area between the pool and wall when that happened, talk about screwing up my day, I thought I was going to $hit my pants. Oh, well atleast mom wasnt there, I was working on cleaning up the pond with the 430 one day and I was pulling a tree out and as I pulled on it the a$$ end came up farther and farther, I had to put my feet up against the bottom of the ROPS as I waited on dad to cut the tree and mom was freakn out telling dad to get me off of the machine before I got hurt.. when he got done he looked at her and then looked at me laughing at the day before when I had pulled that stunt at the lake, she didnt know then! :laugh:

I am guilty of getting to comfortable with a skid more than I am with a mini ex, I guess it's because I feel safer in the skid because I am in the enclosed area with the seat bar, its like a false sense of security you dont have in the mini ex...

wanabe
10-22-2008, 09:07 PM
Sorry about the loss. Just shows us not to get too cought up in working all the time. Enjoy life while you can JR. At your age, all I wanted was a farm, equipment, Ford SD, ect. But now I have it all and it don't really mean much to me. The new wears off and the old shines through! I wish I was your age again. You have your whole life to work. Don't think cabs solve all problems. There was a guy last year that was hogging with a deere tractor with a soundguard cab. Front wheel fell in a hole and he was throwen through the front glass and run over also. Batwings help a bunch in unknowen ground. I just mow with the wing, and come back and drive on what I just cut and can see the holes first.

Dirtman2007
10-22-2008, 09:17 PM
Slopes and horrible working conditions are what I was raised working in. The reason we stay so busy is because we do all the crap that no one else will even bid on. Put me in the middle of a pond 3' deep in mud and I'm good to go. sliding down hills sideways into a pond full of mud with the excavator, yes a little pucker factor occurs every once in a while, and it should to keep you on your toes. I've worked in some horrible places and probably should have not put the machine where it was, but I'm not normal. 1000's of hours in the seat of our machines I know exactly what the limits are and what they are capable of doing. Yes I've pushed the limits before and put myself in somewhat danger, but i've always had a plan on "what if" and had a safe way out.

That one of the reasons why I like to run the machines with the door and windshield closed. just in case some freak accident happens and he machine rolls, you should stay in the cab and not be thrown out.

Here a routine task in the pond excavating business

slipin and slidin
http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=2zhfaRcFz-Y

Junior M
10-22-2008, 09:36 PM
I havent put enough hours on one certain machine to know what it will and won't do.. I know what the limit of the 430 is, more than I know what the limit of the 335, and thats one of the most important things to know to be safe because you will start doing something and boom something bad happens because you didnt know the limit of the machine...

RockSet N' Grade
10-23-2008, 08:25 AM
Junior heres a little of my thinking. The man outside the machine is the one in "control". If you can't see him - stop, and don't dig. Don't swing buckets empty or full over anyone. Always watch where the machine is. If digging around utilities and you hit a power line, who gets fried? The guy in the trench - so keep guys out of the trench if there is ever a question. If you hit overhead lines - sit tight and don't move or touch anything........call for help or just sit there and wait. It is not the machines "limit's" you have to worry about as much as being aware and out of the way if something happens - always watch the equipment around you with quick looks. If working on equipment/implements, check and double check for wheel blocking and implement blocking and if you don't have the right stuff to do it safe, don't do it....saving a moment to get it done is not worth it in the long run. Choose carefully the people you are around when working equipment and rate them in your mind as to safety and judge your physical distance from them accordingly.........Always have an exit strategy in mind. There is too much too list to be safe, but being safe is being aware.

Junior M
10-23-2008, 09:41 AM
Junior heres a little of my thinking. The man outside the machine is the one in "control". If you can't see him - stop, and don't dig. Don't swing buckets empty or full over anyone. Always watch where the machine is. If digging around utilities and you hit a power line, who gets fried? The guy in the trench - so keep guys out of the trench if there is ever a question. If you hit overhead lines - sit tight and don't move or touch anything........call for help or just sit there and wait. It is not the machines "limit's" you have to worry about as much as being aware and out of the way if something happens - always watch the equipment around you with quick looks. If working on equipment/implements, check and double check for wheel blocking and implement blocking and if you don't have the right stuff to do it safe, don't do it....saving a moment to get it done is not worth it in the long run. Choose carefully the people you are around when working equipment and rate them in your mind as to safety and judge your physical distance from them accordingly.........Always have an exit strategy in mind. There is too much too list to be safe, but being safe is being aware.
Yeah, I hate having somebody standing close when I am digging or trenching, I had that problem with a helper on my last irrigation job, I was trying to trench with the t300 we rented and the guy would get right in my blindspots, and get really close to me when I would start the trencher and start digging, I hated it and he couldnt understand why I was yelling at him to back off....

I never dig around utilities, dad does that, he has alot better feel for that than I do, since thats what he did five days a week for 15 years...