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rwhiling
10-23-2008, 12:16 AM
Hello all,

I just moved in to a new home north of Atlanta and the builder installed my lawn on October 1st.

My question is ow long and how much should I water it?

The last time had new Bermuda sod laid down was in July so I knew water water water water!!!!

Now with the colder temperatures of October can I do damage by keeping it too wet?

the section of my lawn that does not get much sun is still a little mushy, and pulling up the sod reveals nice wet roots.

The section that gets lots of sun is not what I would call dry, but it is far from wet....;)

Lastly when should I do the first fertilizer of weed and feed treatment?

Please help a guy out. Thanks much!!!

p

RAlmaroad
10-23-2008, 06:47 AM
The easy way is to find a corner of a sod piece and pull to see if it is begining to root. It should not pull up easily. After a couple of weeks you can reduce the water to about a longer deeper cycle. Grass needs about an inch of water per week anytime it is growing. Two times a week from 1/2" to 3/4" will be great. Bermuda will go dormant with the first frost anyway but the roots are still active. I water dormant grass in the winter but not quite as much. A weekly deep cycle watering is good or whenever there isn't any rain. Roy

rwhiling
10-23-2008, 10:11 AM
Bermuda will go dormant with the first frost anyway but the roots are still active. I water dormant grass in the winter but not quite as much. A weekly deep cycle watering is good or whenever there isn't any rain. Roy

Thanks

so I won't hurt it if I keep watering it the next few weeks until it gets really cold?

RAlmaroad
10-23-2008, 12:11 PM
Thanks

so I won't hurt it if I keep watering it the next few weeks until it gets really cold?

Right and if you can give it a little fertilizer or have about a month before it does dormant, the roots will hold the N over the winter and green up better in the spring. Don't know your situation but a good liquid would be best. The granular will have to break down into the soil--taking time--. I'm not a proponent of Miracle-Grow Sprayer, but that may be your best situation this late. Of course, you could just leave it alone till spring. If you've got time, overdress (Spread over the existing grass) a little cow manure with compost which will break down during the winter and provide a little slow nitrogen. Even that won't be necessary. Make sure in late February that you look into applying a pre-em to control the weeds next summer. Pre-emergent is put on the dormant grass to keep the germinating weed seed from taking hold into the soil. Hope this will help you.

rwhiling
10-23-2008, 12:19 PM
Right and if you can give it a little fertilizer or have about a month before it does dormant, the roots will hold the N over the winter and green up better in the spring. Don't know your situation but a good liquid would be best. ................. Make sure in late February that you look into applying a pre-em to control the weeds next summer. Pre-emergent is put on the dormant grass to keep the germinating weed seed from taking hold into the soil. Hope this will help you.


Thanks again!

I have a drop spreader and just did 4 feed applications on my old lawn and a pre emergant in in Febuary like you stated.

I have the good old miracle grow feeder that the wife used for her flowers so I could get some lawn food and use that..better than nothing?

Got any recomendations or links to info about liquid to use. I am a rookie here and never seen anything but dry spreader based stuff at the local hammer depot

RAlmaroad
10-23-2008, 02:07 PM
There are a few of us that use ALL liquid applications from Pre-Em to fertilizer, fungicides, and herbicides. Generally you should some powerful spraying equipment like the skid sprayer. These are anywhere from 50gal tanks up to 300gal tanks inside a truck bed. I use a small boom that covers a 8' swatch. Then there are a few that use granular pre-em, and fertilizer.
Liquids can be adjusted to stick on the weeds and can be carefully apply very close to plantings while the granules are thrown about and I've really never been quite sure that they went where I had hoped. Of course the big Lesco spreaders help with this with the cut off on one side and can carry 80lbs of fertilizer unlike the small one.
Since I gather that you like to maintain your own yard, then you could get a better spreader or invest in one of those small 12-volt,15gal. which are ATV sprayers from Tractor supply. They do a great job but you must know how to mix and watch your rate of application. Then there again you must buy the bulk chemicals which could cost big bucks. Insignia which is used for fungus is something like $1300/7.5lb bag. Yeah, costly.
I don't want to burst a bubble, but a pro is really worthwhile. No guessing and no storage of expensive chem. There are a couple of us that maintain lawns all year with something every month with the provisions that the lawns are irrigated. All you have to do is mow. There's a great deal of satisfaction from maintaining your lawn and it is much more extensive than just applying a little fertilizer. Lawns are temperamental in that the pro must size up the current rain fall, the PH of the soil, the correct type of fertilizer for the particular turf and spoon feed it when it gets sick from fungus or an infestation of weeds. A healthy lawn is something that homeowners can boast about to their friends and be proud of. Anyway, choose wisely and just ask when you need help.

PS...Hire a pro and I do not mean those jerks in the big trucks with initials like TG or CL.

rwhiling
10-24-2008, 10:43 AM
PS...Hire a pro and I do not mean those jerks in the big trucks with initials like TG or CL.

Thanks, I was always wondering if there were any options for liquid for us run of the mill homeowners.

I would definately spend the cash to hire someone that knew what they were doing on the chemical side of things.

However as you mentioned my only experience with anyone was with the "Wal-Marts" of the lawn industry and I was not impressed.

The only person I have heard about otherwise in Atlanta from a friend is "Top Turff"

If anyone has any reccomendations in the Cumming Georga area please let me know.

rwhiling
10-24-2008, 11:01 AM
I am going to add one more thing to this mess:)

my front and one side yard will get good sun so I am sure with enough water and "vitamins" the Bermuda will do fine there.

I am not so sure about the back yard. Looks like it is going to get sun from about 2-6 every day in the summer.

is there anything shade tolerant that will blend in well with my Bermuda?

I will get some pictures of the lot ASAP

Blueflashturf
10-29-2008, 11:56 PM
id be hesitant to apply much N, as this will promote top growth of the plant...with the first frost approaching any time now... you want to get roots into the ground asap. a little N isnt going to hurt but your major macronutrient applied needs to be K (potassium) any good starter fert, is going to include this. you wont have a great lawn this winter. but with the proper management of ur fert your turf will hold the proper amount of nutrients to survive the winter and give you minimal loss and dessication when the spring transition starts...