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Jacob's Yardworks LLC
10-30-2008, 06:56 PM
we've done a few small paver jobs this one the most recent so tell me what yall think, comments and criticism welcome im always looking to improve!

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation108.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation109.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation111.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation112.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation113.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation119.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation120.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation121.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation125.jpg

and the last one is pops truck
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f187/jakethesnake4107/Graduation128-1.jpg

PlatinumLandCon
10-30-2008, 09:21 PM
Looks great man. Curve is smooth, pattern is consistent... one thing I can suggest is extending the base a couple more inches on either side.

How old are you? How long have you been in the biz? I guess you're making the shift to some construction aspects of the green industry. From the looks of it, you're starting off on the right foot :)

Jacob's Yardworks LLC
10-30-2008, 10:25 PM
Well I just turned 18 this month and im in college now, long story short i started the business when i was younger and it got so big so fast my dad resigned his full time job of 20 years and is now running my/our business full time. 7 full time employees now and still growing. I run the few hardscapes we do with a couple guys, one who knows a fair amount about hardscaping too. But hey i figure the best way to learn more is just get out and do it. Thanks for the kind words!

PlatinumLandCon
10-30-2008, 10:30 PM
Check this out:

You get what I'm saying?

zedosix
10-30-2008, 10:57 PM
You should of run that long walkway in a runner pattern for sure, would of eliminated so much cutting and saved you some brick too! Small walkway looks nice.

PlatinumLandCon
10-30-2008, 11:19 PM
You should of run that long walkway in a runner pattern for sure, would of eliminated so much cutting and saved you some brick too! Small walkway looks nice.

This guy is a genius, listen to what he has to say. The curves are smooth so you wouldn't have needed any cuts in the field pavers if you did it in a runner like zedo said.

DVS Hardscaper
10-31-2008, 12:00 AM
You should of run that long walkway in a runner pattern for sure, would of eliminated so much cutting and saved you some brick too! Small walkway looks nice.

I dunno bout all that, Andy :)

Running bond pattern would certainly have looked nice. No doubt.

Sometimes when it comes to architecture, you can't be concerned with saving time and pavers. :hammerhead: I really like the walk. The pattern he used is very unique, it demonstrats an emphasis on attention to detail. and really gives that walkway a personality :walking:

DVS Hardscaper
10-31-2008, 09:41 AM
Fill both sides of the walk with solid, continuous masses of Black Eyed Susans and it will look quite nice.

Jacob's Yardworks LLC
10-31-2008, 03:12 PM
PlatinumLandCon: I definitely see what your saying about eliminating that soldier course there.

DVS: Thanks for the kind words, I had some ideas like the Black Eyed Susans and such for around the walk but the home owners are big in gardening so they wanted to do that part themselves.


zedo: we kept all the pavers running the same way as on the raised patio so they were square up to it. But next time ill think about the running bond to eliminate all those cuts!

Reconwalls
10-31-2008, 05:01 PM
run your soldier course all they way to the landing. It would make it look like the walk way is longer. Still keep the horizontal border going the same way just a little shorter.

Just what i like. Looks good though.

iDesign
10-31-2008, 10:53 PM
I like it because it is unique. Nice contrast between the soldier course and the run. More importantly, is the customer happy. Its certainly a conversation piece.

Mike

AztlanLC
11-02-2008, 05:23 PM
Well I'm more concerned on what type of base was used? how thick? also what about the edge restrain it looks like it was installed on top of the sand, also next time try to finish all the sides with a bigger piece try to avoid those little pieces they will usually move overtime.

phlandscaping
11-02-2008, 05:27 PM
Looks great, I wish I had been that good at 18! I see you being very successful in your life!

zedosix
11-05-2008, 07:00 PM
This guy is a genius, listen to what he has to say. The curves are smooth so you wouldn't have needed any cuts in the field pavers if you did it in a runner like zedo said.

Gee, thanks for the comments. "blushing" Here is an example of what I mean. When transitioning from one large area (patio) to a walkway, try to be creative and at the same time you save a bundle of time and material. No cutting cornners on design DVS, just logical to me. :)

PlatinumLandCon
11-06-2008, 12:44 AM
Lookin good as always zedo

Man, I love Permacon. I have Trafalgar, Vendome, and Mega Arbel jobs lined up for next year... I'm so pumped!

DVS Hardscaper
11-06-2008, 04:05 PM
Gee, thanks for the comments. "blushing" Here is an example of what I mean. When transitioning from one large area (patio) to a walkway, try to be creative and at the same time you save a bundle of time and material. No cutting cornners on design DVS, just logical to me. :)


Andy, the pic you posted is very impressive.

But, ok, how do I word this. Ok, in the pic you have an arbel circle at the end of the walk, which is what is transitioning the walk into the patio. Yet prior to the circle, the walk is set in a running bond pattern.

Your original comment regarded "cutting" and "saving time", it never mentioned "transitioning" :)

Other than you have a circle at the end, how is that running bond pattern any different than the angled pattern in the Jake's photo? Honestly, I believe Jake's workmanship in the cutting and mitering of the pavers in his walkway is outstanding. I know it took a while to do, but look at the end result!

No disrespect, and maybe I'm not understand what you're saying, Andy, or maybe you're not understanding what I'm saying, from an architectural standpoint I'm not seeing how your random pattern consists of any more logic than Jake's pattern. The circle is a nice touch. However from a drop-click-and-go mentality - then sure I understand ya. But from a mentality of "what can we do to make this really stand out" mentality - I'm not following ya.

One of the great things about paver work is that you can be as creative as you can dream. And with creativity - usually comes cutting and mitering pavers.

zedosix
11-06-2008, 06:51 PM
Andy, the pic you posted is very impressive.

But, ok, how do I word this. Ok, in the pic you have an arbel circle at the end of the walk, which is what is transitioning the walk into the patio. Yet prior to the circle, the walk is set in a running bond pattern.

Your original comment regarded "cutting" and "saving time", it never mentioned "transitioning" :)

Other than you have a circle at the end, how is that running bond pattern any different than the angled pattern in the Jake's photo? Honestly, I believe Jake's workmanship in the cutting and mitering of the pavers in his walkway is outstanding. I know it took a while to do, but look at the end result!

No disrespect, and maybe I'm not understand what you're saying, Andy, or maybe you're not understanding what I'm saying, from an architectural standpoint I'm not seeing how your random pattern consists of any more logic than Jake's pattern. The circle is a nice touch. However from a drop-click-and-go mentality - then sure I understand ya. But from a mentality of "what can we do to make this really stand out" mentality - I'm not following ya.

One of the great things about paver work is that you can be as creative as you can dream. And with creativity - usually comes cutting and mitering pavers.

Ok maybe transitioning isn't the right word here but his work could of been done faster, with less material waste and look nicer imo, if he would of curved the brick to follow the walkway. It looks so cold with the lines running straight. My only reason to comment at all, is to help this guy who obviously takes great pride in his workmanship is to give some sugestions as to how it could be done and how it could look. Maybe my pics don't really tell the story but just wanted to show him how smooth the walk looks without all those cuts.

PlatinumLandCon
11-06-2008, 08:09 PM
I think this is what Andy and I were getting at. Drawing is rough but you get the idea. I think it helps the flow of the path.

Jacob's Yardworks LLC
11-06-2008, 09:07 PM
I think this is what Andy and I were getting at. Drawing is rough but you get the idea. I think it helps the flow of the path.

Thats what I needed! Makes sense now to see it drawn out, i do agree it would help with the flow doing a running bond and getting rid of the soldier row infront of the walk as well as eliminate a lot of cuts. Hey, something to try next time! Thanks for the visual.

PlatinumLandCon
11-06-2008, 09:09 PM
Thats what I needed! Makes sense now to see it drawn out, i do agree it would help with the flow doing a running bond and getting rid of the soldier row infront of the walk as well as eliminate a lot of cuts. Hey, something to try next time! Thanks for the visual.

No worries man, I'm a visual learner myself so I thought I'd try to remove all the grey areas with everyone trying to explain what to do.:drinkup:

wurkn with amish
11-07-2008, 07:00 PM
you can do it that way and yes its less work, but the way he did it (Jacob)looks 100x's better.

amdspitfire
11-07-2008, 07:13 PM
I just did a project and laid out the border of the paved pathway first, then filled it in second. Which way is correct?

zedosix
11-07-2008, 07:28 PM
you can do it that way and yes its less work, but the way he did it (Jacob)looks 100x's better.

In the eyes of the unexperienced I would agree with your statement.

wurkn with amish
11-07-2008, 08:51 PM
zedo
are you saying I'm unexperienced?
I've done them both ways, I preffer Jacobs way

zedosix
11-07-2008, 10:54 PM
zedo
are you saying I'm unexperienced?
I've done them both ways, I preffer Jacobs way

Maybe you just need your eyes checked thats all. :) You know they do get worse with age.

PlatinumLandCon
11-08-2008, 12:58 AM
Maybe you just need your eyes checked thats all. :) You know they do get worse with age.

I've gotta agree, there's no flow the way jacob did it. Its fine to do it like that, but I don't think its the most pleasing for the eyes when walking down the path.

kootoomootoo
11-08-2008, 11:04 AM
If you do it the way Jacob has you could add another soldier running across (perpendicular to path) every 15ft or so (measure total distance divide by 4 say)...would carry it a little better and add a design element.


Wouldnt take long with the cut off either.

But Screw that I would runner bond to start.

PlatinumLandCon
11-08-2008, 05:55 PM
If you do it the way Jacob has you could add another soldier running across (perpendicular to path) every 15ft or so (measure total distance divide by 4 say)...would carry it a little better and add a design element.


Wouldnt take long with the cut off either.

But Screw that I would runner bond to start.

Thats a great idea, essentially dividing it into sections. I thnk that would make a pretty slick use of the straight lines in the field pavers.