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GWhunter
11-07-2008, 05:10 PM
Hey guys great site. I'm looking for a deere 35d mini ex,for some work around my property and a small excavating biz. I already have a small deere tlb and will likely use it as well. My goal is to end up with a profitable side biz and build a good reputaion for quality work a fair prices. My question to you guys is my local dealer is willing to demo the 35d for a week at my place. I'm going with a cab and I'm not sure weather the 35d fits my needs the 27d looks really close in size. I'm pretty sure I'd like to be setup similar to Minimax's equipment. Although I'll need to test the waters on the mowers. So during the demo what should I look for? What size bucket should I ask for?

Matt T.:usflag:

Junior M
11-07-2008, 05:39 PM
Hey guys great site. I'm looking for a deere 35d mini ex,for some work around my property and a small excavating biz. I already have a small deere tlb and will likely use it as well. My goal is to end up with a profitable side biz and build a good reputaion for quality work a fair prices. My question to you guys is my local dealer is willing to demo the 35d for a week at my place. I'm going with a cab and I'm not sure weather the 35d fits my needs the 27d looks really close in size. I'm pretty sure I'd like to be setup similar to Minimax's equipment. Although I'll need to test the waters on the mowers. So during the demo what should I look for? What size bucket should I ask for?

Matt T.:usflag:
If your set on Deere just ask for whatever you need for the job your taking it out on. If you arent set on Deere go demo some other brands and see what you think, demo some conventional house machines, and some zts house machines...

bobcat_ron
11-07-2008, 06:34 PM
Go for the 35D, my Dad owns a Hitachi ZX27 and it seems small for what we do with it and I always bug him about getting rid of it in 100 hours for a bigger machine.
The 35D is bigger all around with more power and bigger engine, but the cab and house are the same, it's a better choice over the 27D.

bobcatexc
11-07-2008, 07:21 PM
I rent a 35D quit a bit, it's the perfect size for what I do, not to big, but not to small. Very quick and smooth hydraulics. If I was to buy a new machine it would be the 35D with hydraulic thumb and my personal favorite 3' smooth mouth bucket.

GWhunter
11-07-2008, 07:27 PM
Thanks for the quick replys. I know what i need for the work around my house but for later when I'm starting to work with it is the 35d the right one? I was looking at the 50d but it's a little too heavy and I want to stay small and selective in the work I do. I did a few jobs this summer and a mini would have been a big help. I really want the versitility the mini's offer. What about finance option? Since the economy is shaking and leasing seems a good option too me. The payments will be less and there's also a ballon payment plan that would keep payments low and allow my to see how the business side goes. If I find I can't be successful with it and make enough to pay the machine off I can always have the lease to fall back on? Does this sound like it makes sense?

Matt T.:usflag:

Junior M
11-07-2008, 07:31 PM
Its hard to decide on a machine until you find a niche in the market, like minimax, or get some work from some where, my advice is get some work lined up and try the 35d and decide if it is enough machine for what you want to do, dont just buy a machine because it seems like it would be the right machine and then find out you made a bad choice for size 3 months in to owning it..

SellingIron
11-07-2008, 07:41 PM
Hey guys great site. I'm looking for a deere 35d mini ex,for some work around my property and a small excavating biz. I already have a small deere tlb and will likely use it as well. My goal is to end up with a profitable side biz and build a good reputaion for quality work a fair prices. My question to you guys is my local dealer is willing to demo the 35d for a week at my place. I'm going with a cab and I'm not sure weather the 35d fits my needs the 27d looks really close in size. I'm pretty sure I'd like to be setup similar to Minimax's equipment. Although I'll need to test the waters on the mowers. So during the demo what should I look for? What size bucket should I ask for?

Matt T.:usflag:

JD(Hitachi) makes a nice Mini X. They are pretty smooth.. Here is a spec chart that match things up for you. Hitachi does build them for JD.. Hope it helps..

bobcat_ron
11-07-2008, 09:26 PM
JD(Hitachi) makes a nice Mini X. They are pretty smooth.. Here is a spec chart that match things up for you. Hitachi does build them for JD.. Hope it helps..

And yet when I bought new lights for our ZX27, it was packaged in Deere bags and boxes? http://deephousepage.com/smilies/conf40.gif

minimax
11-07-2008, 09:55 PM
I really like the 35D deere mini-x.I have had great luck with them and I think they are the best mowing mini-x out there.I would think they would let you demo one for a week but you mite have to keep the hours down to something like less than 40 hours.I would ask for 2 or 3 buckets in diff. sizes.

minimax

bobcat_ron
11-07-2008, 10:07 PM
The only complaint you will hear is the cab door is terrible to get in and out through, it's only 24" wide and leg room is at a premium, the other names out there are better for cab space, the Komatsu PC35 is a real close contender.

GWhunter
11-07-2008, 10:08 PM
Mini, I was hoping you'd weigh in. I was planning on a 18" bucket and a 36" bucket. I'll be demoing at my home and plan on moving a lot of rocks with it. My sales guy says the JD thumb is good but I've heard otherwise from actual owners. I'd really like to end up mowing with it but for now I can only really test it on my property and all I've got is rocks and some trenching. What do you guys think about buy vs leaseing? I'm trying to make this happen soon. I've talked with Mini about what his rates are but it seems there's quite a big difference in cost of living between the Northeast and the Northwest. So how is cost calculated? I mean do I set out trying to make the jobs pay off the machine and then add in maintenance cost and fuel etc? And the form an hourly rate from there. Or price per job? What happens when you look at a job and start digging only to find an imoveable object under ground and it's more than your capible of handling? And then there's the insurance where should I look for that?

Thanks
Matt T.;)

SellingIron
11-08-2008, 09:08 AM
Mini, I was hoping you'd weigh in. I was planning on a 18" bucket and a 36" bucket. I'll be demoing at my home and plan on moving a lot of rocks with it. My sales guy says the JD thumb is good but I've heard otherwise from actual owners. I'd really like to end up mowing with it but for now I can only really test it on my property and all I've got is rocks and some trenching. What do you guys think about buy vs leaseing? I'm trying to make this happen soon. I've talked with Mini about what his rates are but it seems there's quite a big difference in cost of living between the Northeast and the Northwest. So how is cost calculated? I mean do I set out trying to make the jobs pay off the machine and then add in maintenance cost and fuel etc? And the form an hourly rate from there. Or price per job? What happens when you look at a job and start digging only to find an immovable object under ground and it's more than your capible of handling? And then there's the insurance where should I look for that?

Thanks
Matt T.;)

As far as financing do they have 0% if so how long? You always come out ahead if you don't have to pay any finance charges for the term of the contract.Also, does that company have a rental fleet. If so, do they have a breaker you can quickly install for one of those immovable objects???

AWJ Services
11-08-2008, 11:31 AM
When you price a job it is an "Estimate"
That means it has the potential to change in price.

As far as operating cost it will vary by usage and area but excavators will have much lower maint and operating costs than a skid steer under normal conditions.

As far as leasing and Financing most leases are just glorified financing.
Consult your Accountant on the tax burdens of each.
I will add that the 0% financing is always the way to go.



I've talked with Mini about what his rates are but it seems there's quite a big difference in cost of living between the Northeast and the Northwest. So how is cost calculated?

There is no exact formula for a new business owner but take all associated operating expenses
Fuel
Insurance
Advertising
Truck
Trailer
Maint

Determine what they cost monthly.
If you own any of the equipment outright there will need to be a cost associated with that item charged to the business.

Take that number and add what you desire to make a month and divide by expected number of hours per month worked.

You will find that your numbers will change as you work and get accurate data.

I prefer to price it by the job and stay away from hourly rates.

Here in Ga we get about 50 to 70 an hour for a skid steer.
A mini excavator goes for around 65 an hour for a 5 ton class.

I will be purchasing a mower head for my excavator soon and I think I will charge around 90 to 100 an hour for mowing as a reference.


As far as Insurance ask your Insurance agent.


What happens when you look at a job and start digging only to find an immovable object under ground and it's more than your capable of handling?


Thats the million dollar question.
You do not want to open a Pandora's box.
Use your judgment but sometimes you have to concede the job and walkaway.
I explain these type of things to the customer before hand.

GWhunter
11-08-2008, 04:03 PM
I own the tlb outright and have alot of 3 pt hitch attachments for it. I also own a 12k dump trailer and a 14k 25' gooseneck flatbed. I'm still making payments on my truck. So I'd only need to factor in fuel and maint on the equipment I own out right. The prices you guys quoted an hour seem low for my area but I'll need to look into it futher. What about the legal stuff for a business. Who do I need to contact to do that. Should I set up a DBA or LLC or what? How much variation do I neeed? Should I plow in the winter since excavating will be slow? I still plan on keeping my day job. I'm in the power industry so I have a pretty demanding schedule and have an on call rotation to deal with. Should I go ahead and advertise and see what type of work comes my way? Is there such a thing as offering too many services? I'll be working by myself so I don't want to spread myself too thin.

Matt T.

ksss
11-08-2008, 05:15 PM
I own the tlb outright and have alot of 3 pt hitch attachments for it. I also own a 12k dump trailer and a 14k 25' gooseneck flatbed. I'm still making payments on my truck. So I'd only need to factor in fuel and maint on the equipment I own out right. The prices you guys quoted an hour seem low for my area but I'll need to look into it futher. What about the legal stuff for a business. Who do I need to contact to do that. Should I set up a DBA or LLC or what? How much variation do I neeed? Should I plow in the winter since excavating will be slow? I still plan on keeping my day job. I'm in the power industry so I have a pretty demanding schedule and have an on call rotation to deal with. Should I go ahead and advertise and see what type of work comes my way? Is there such a thing as offering too many services? I'll be working by myself so I don't want to spread myself too thin.

Matt T.

I would limit your services to what you can do competently. A new business only has one chance to get it right. I would be conservative until you get more familiar with your abilities, costs and the local market. No one is going to tolerate you learning the business on their dime. I would try to bid jobs as much as you can. That way if it takes longer, its on you not the customer. Once you get better/faster you can go hourly more often and not piss off the customer. Typically I do much better bidding than hourly anyway. Until you get the feel for bidding, your work rate and the local market, be prepared to make some bidding mistakes. Its a steep learning curve. Junior makes a good point about buying once and buying right. You might look into an RPO. They will apply your rent toward the purchase of the machine (usually not a 100%) but if you find it is not the right machine you can turn it back (you will lose your rent, but your not on the hook for an excavator that does not work for you). The size of the machine is dependent on what you want to do. If you plan on doing more excavating the 10K plus machines are much more capable. I owned a 35 sized machine and am currently on my second 12K machine. The additional work I was able to do because of the larger machine surprised even me. It also extended my work year due to better ability to dig in frozen ground. They are a little larger usually 1 foot to 16" wider and of course heavier, but you come real close to backhoe type digging specs. It all comes down to what you plan on focusing on. Another reason to stay a little more focused when you start out.
On the Deere thumb and coupler. They are both garbage. Go aftermarket.

AWJ Services
11-08-2008, 06:17 PM
The price needs to be adjusted for your area.

It takes no more time to become an LLC than a DBA.
I would go the LLC Route.
The reason being is that your Business credit is linked with what ever you start with.
So if you start as a DBA abd then change to an LLC later there will be a break in you Credit history.
On how to do it just Google it.You can do it online or with a phone call.

http://www.sos.nh.gov/corporate/llcleader.htm

I purchased a 12k machine and wished I purchased a 18k machine.
Everyone really worries about being to big ,but I have found that a large footprint usually does not cause as many problems as does a machine that does not have enough power for the job.
Plus the Larger size will always do the same job faster.

Gravel Rat
11-08-2008, 06:56 PM
I wouldn't go any smaller than a 12,000lb machine or a 161 Kubota size they are good for small excavations or doing septic systems etc. Get into a 18,000lb machine so something like a PC-78 Komatsu you will need a tandem axle truck and tilt trailer. Your starting to get into fullsize excavating then doing house foundations landclearing etc.

In my mind a 12,000lb your going to be doing landscaping (hard scaping) and drainage work. A 18,000lb machine your full on excavating.

I have used 6000lb Bobcat mini its useless compared to the 12,000lb Kubota. A 12,000lb machine can go 95% of the places a 6000-7000lb machine will. A 12,000lb mini will go into places where its too steep for a 6000lb machine.

ksss
11-08-2008, 08:03 PM
I wouldn't go any smaller than a 12,000lb machine or a 161 Kubota size they are good for small excavations or doing septic systems etc. Get into a 18,000lb machine so something like a PC-78 Komatsu you will need a tandem axle truck and tilt trailer. Your starting to get into fullsize excavating then doing house foundations landclearing etc.

In my mind a 12,000lb your going to be doing landscaping (hard scaping) and drainage work. A 18,000lb machine your full on excavating.

I have used 6000lb Bobcat mini its useless compared to the 12,000lb Kubota. A 12,000lb machine can go 95% of the places a 6000-7000lb machine will. A 12,000lb mini will go into places where its too steep for a 6000lb machine.


I will hijack this thread for just a minute. An 18K machine is an anomaly. It is too big for a lot of smaller jobs and not big enough for foundation excavation. I looked hard at an 18K machine. However with the TB153 I get better specs than 75% of the 18K machines on the market. I nearly purchased an IHI 80NX, great machine, but they are considerably more difficult to move around than my 12K machine. The biggest issue was I would lose the ability to move two machines on the same trailer. The areas I believe these machines excel is in larger but lighter excavating tasks, such as rock setting, utility installations, logging and so forth. However with the right 12-14K machine you can get most all the performance just without the weight. Sometimes you need that weight and if you do then an 18K machine is the machine. I would disagree with an 18K machine being a full on excavating excavator.

RockSet N' Grade
11-08-2008, 09:34 PM
I own an 18,000 lb machine which has been my primary machine. Ksss is correct on everything he represented on that particular animal. My biggest bummer has been having to take two trucks and trailers and not being able to load both on a single trailer - a real time waster (i.e.: lost revenue for time spent ). Because of our home/lot sizes, it has worked fine for me for what I do, but I can not dig a basement or foundation and compete. I would also say that the $$ per hr. on an 18k machine in this market is about the same as a smaller machine and that is not good when it comes to repairs. For example: on an 18k machine your rubber bands are around $4,700 each!

Gravel Rat
11-08-2008, 09:37 PM
Guys here with 18,000lb excavators do clear land to dig foundations to doing septic fields. There is really no inbetween the next size machine a contractor has is a 16 ton excavator.

It all depends on what you want to do. If you are going to get into the excavation business then a 18,000lb machine is a good start. If you want to stick with landscape/excavation then a 12,000lb machine is a good size.

RockSet N' Grade
11-08-2008, 09:38 PM
I have wondered all my life what I am.......I think I found it!! I am an "anomoly".......now, I just have to go to Webster's to find out what that is......Seriously though, a 12k machine has alot of advantages and is very versatile, so think hard if you are going to 18k and if you have the work for an 18k.......bigger than that may be more efficient, depending on what your target market is....

Gravel Rat
11-08-2008, 09:50 PM
From his first post it does sound like he wants to stay with small scale excavations like going into a persons back yard to dig footing trenches or build boulder walls etc.

One benefit of a 12,000lb machine you can move it with a triaxle trailer preferably a gooseneck behind a 1 ton or F-450 sized truck.

Where I'am there isn't any demand for a 6000-7000lb excavator because rental places have them for rent. Building contractors will rent them or a able homeowner will rent them. They are very limited to what they can do most building contractors use them for digging utility trenches. Home owners try to do landclearing that never works :laugh:

GWhunter
11-08-2008, 10:08 PM
By the sound of your opinions guys like Minimax shouldn't even be in business. Look there's a lot of smaller jobs that these machines are matched up for. I could have been busy all summer had I had a 35d. I appreciate all the opinions but for now at least I'm looking to stay with this size machine. There's quite a few guys around here doing foundations and septics. I'm looking concentrate on the sites there machines won't go. I'm thinking that I'm going to stay with selective clearing and hook up with local property managment companies looling for small clearing or digging. That way I can truly test the waters.

Matt T.;)

Gravel Rat
11-08-2008, 10:15 PM
Minimax specializes in brush cutting etc. Is that what you want to get into ?

Junior M
11-08-2008, 10:23 PM
There is plenty of work out there for a 35d size machine, just a little harder to get into because everybody seems to have one, at least around here, thats why you have to find a niche for one, like what minimax is doing. We have found a lil niche backfilling pools, there are only 2 other guys around here that do it..

AWJ Services
11-08-2008, 10:28 PM
By the sound of your opinions guys like Minimax shouldn't even be in business.

The JD machine has a high Aux Flow for it's size.
Thats why he picked it.

I can put My 161 almost any place he can put the JD 35.
I have more reach and more Aux hyd flow.
More breakout force and an angle front blade.

Most guys starting out just have no experience to determine what machine to buy.
They look at a few spec sheets, go to a dealer and suddenly they have an Epiphany and they now know what is the perfect machine.

Good Luck.:drinkup:

ksss
11-08-2008, 11:04 PM
By the sound of your opinions guys like Minimax shouldn't even be in business. Look there's a lot of smaller jobs that these machines are matched up for. I could have been busy all summer had I had a 35d. I appreciate all the opinions but for now at least I'm looking to stay with this size machine. There's quite a few guys around here doing foundations and septics. I'm looking concentrate on the sites there machines won't go. I'm thinking that I'm going to stay with selective clearing and hook up with local property managment companies looling for small clearing or digging. That way I can truly test the waters.

Matt T.;)



I wasn't saying that a 35 sized machine has no value. My point is to get the machine that will allow you the most versatility. If that is 35 size machine, get after it. I only point out my experiences, so that maybe it might provide some insight from someone who has had both size machines. I dare say that your not going to go anywhere with a 35 that you cant go with a 50. The difference is very apparent when you get into moving material. The 50 is much more capable. But its your show do what you think is right.

RockSet N' Grade
11-08-2008, 11:05 PM
GW........minimax has optimized his equipment for what he is doing. There is no one perfect machine. Shoot, there was a guy here a couple years ago that claimed he helicoptered in his equipment to do yards in an upper class market. Choose your equipment carefully for your targeted market, research, ask questions...that is why we are here, to bounce things off each other, get ideas and refine to become more competetive. There is no holy grail.....

Construct'O
11-08-2008, 11:07 PM
There is plenty of work out there for a 35d size machine, just a little harder to get into because everybody seems to have one, at least around here, thats why you have to find a niche for one, like what minimax is doing. We have found a lil niche backfilling pools, there are only 2 other guys around here that do it..

Good point there! I have a 303 mini and has really fit into my type of work which is field drainage tile repair work.The farmers get holes in there tile and they make sinkholes in the fields.

You a have to dig down to the tile and repair it with tile,fitting ,and of course manual labor at times.Did i mention mud:)

My machine was used with only 850 hours when i got it.Now has around 1150 hours.Because of the niche thing of my work i can charge $85 dollars and hour which i think is pretty good for a 7600 lb. machine.

Runs cheap,have had no problems with the machine ,so the cost to operate has been good,for the money earned.The machine has almost paid it's self half off in a little over the year i have gotten it.

So bigger doesn't always meet more money.Plus no one else wants to do the repair work ,so have been able to keep busy.It gets muddy working at times ,but the tracks work good ,way better the tractor backhoes and the digging is usually black dirt,mud, and moist heavy clay.Not any of that (red concrete dirt) luckly:):usflag:

Gravel Rat
11-08-2008, 11:55 PM
Minimax is in the Pacific Northwest its just like where I'am, brush and weeds/heavy grass grows like no tommorow. His job will be never ending. For my area where the brush and weeds grow it has to be done by hand.

You can buy a 6000lb machine but you will find it very limited. Its up to you but your just throwing money down the drain.

minimax
11-09-2008, 01:04 AM
I just got back to reading the thread.Here is my take on this,You can buy a bigger machine and that is great but here is the problem,My one ton dodge and my 25' foot gooseneck 14000 lbs GVWR trailer with the 35D with the brushcutter on it weight in at 25,200 lbs so a 50d set up for brushcutting would put me way over what you can haul with a 1 ton truck,My 35D weight's 10,200 lbs with the steel tracks,add on counterweight,cab and the cutter,So hauling a 50 with a cutter would put you in CDL class, And more weight than you can pull with a 1 ton truck.A deere 35D specs out better than most 50 and 60 size machines for aux. flow to run a brushcutter and more flow means faster work speed.I have at least 2 jobs a month that a 35 size machine won't fit into because it is to wide.GR if there is no work for a 35 size machine why do I have 1550 hours on my mini-x 16 months of owning it? Also a 50 size machine costs $15,000 dollars more than a 35 size machine.And here is a rough cost break down.
New 35D mini-x=$45,000
Cutter head= $7,500
Comes to $52,500
fuel per 8 hrs of cutting time,20 gals@$4 gal=$80
maintenance costs of mini-x $12 dollars per hour
maintenance costs of cutter $2.50 dollars per hour
Wages for me $30 dollars per hour
Depreciation= $9.70 per hour
Other cost to run business $10 dollars per hour
Trade in value for mini-x with 2500 hrs=$25,000,for the cutter $3,250,total of $28,250
I come up with with a cost of $74.20 dollars per hour with a $30 per hour wage in that number and I charge more than that number.

I have been working on this post way to long.

minimax

AWJ Services
11-09-2008, 01:24 AM
Great Post MiniMax.

.

coopers
11-09-2008, 03:24 AM
Why not bid jobs, rent for now and then see what you actually end up using the most? I have an idea as to what I'd like to do and what I want to have, but before I get locked into buying an expensive toy, I'm going to wait and see if I can actually justify using it.

JDSKIDSTEER
11-09-2008, 08:56 AM
As far as financing do they have 0% if so how long? You always come out ahead if you don't have to pay any finance charges for the term of the contract.Also, does that company have a rental fleet. If so, do they have a breaker you can quickly install for one of those immovable objects???We have 0% for 42 mos., But rumor has it that rates may be going up. Money is getting harder to borrow and companies will have to pay more for their financing.

SellingIron
11-09-2008, 09:55 AM
We have 0% for 42 mos., But rumor has it that rates may be going up. Money is getting harder to borrow and companies will have to pay more for their financing.

HEY JD, I was going to say thanks for the sales lead but things don't look good for your customer. Oasis...

ConstSvcs
11-09-2008, 10:24 AM
Mini, I was hoping you'd weigh in. I was planning on a 18" bucket and a 36" bucket. I'll be demoing at my home and plan on moving a lot of rocks with it. My sales guy says the JD thumb is good but I've heard otherwise from actual owners. I'd really like to end up mowing with it but for now I can only really test it on my property and all I've got is rocks and some trenching. What do you guys think about buy vs leaseing? I'm trying to make this happen soon. I've talked with Mini about what his rates are but it seems there's quite a big difference in cost of living between the Northeast and the Northwest. So how is cost calculated? I mean do I set out trying to make the jobs pay off the machine and then add in maintenance cost and fuel etc? And the form an hourly rate from there. Or price per job? What happens when you look at a job and start digging only to find an imoveable object under ground and it's more than your capible of handling? And then there's the insurance where should I look for that?

Thanks
Matt T.;)

Matt,

I own a Kubota KX91-3 (7,400 #'s) conventional counterweight machine. I have used my friends JD 50 (11,000 #'s) many times and will say that although zero tail-swing machines are great I prefer the additional lifting ability at full boom extention (over the side of the tracks) that my machine has. I could not imagine the loss of capacity that a JD35 will have over the side with a 36" bucket and hydraulic thumb ;);)

If I did not already own a Kubota....(give them a try)....I would own a Tak 135 (I believe thats the model). Do the comps ! the lifting, digging and longevity are there.

I love JD.....as I own a CT322 but not all things need to be black & yellow.

I think a 7-8000 lb machine is a great mini.......we have slung and lifted ours into a poured foundation many times with a JD 120.

The weight of the machine is good...............just think about what happens over the side of the machine so that you're not always needing to crowd the boom to swing over the side with a full bucket. :)

Tom T

AWJ Services
11-09-2008, 10:34 AM
We have 0% for 42 mos., But rumor has it that rates may be going up. Money is getting harder to borrow and companies will have to pay more for their financing.

Finance companies are in business to finance.
Most have no other way to generate income.
So if they do not finance then they will go out of business?
I am oversimplifying this but the reality is JD,Bobcat Takeuchi,Cat etc are Dependant on Financing to sell products.
Often times the Interest rate is the deal maker.
So give it a few months of no machine sales and manufacturer stock not getting depleted and mysteriously the financing will re appear.

The economy is a big circle.

GWhunter
11-09-2008, 02:20 PM
Well, for me Mini hit the the nail on the head. I already have my truck and trailer and the 50d is just too heavy. I plan on getting a mower down the road. I already have a flail mower for my tractor. I've found several small electrical contractors interested in my services for utility trenches. And since I'm an electrician myself utility trenches seems a good fit. I understand what you guys are saying about larger machines but the weight is a factor for me. If the need is the I will but a larger machine. But I'm looking to do the smaller jobs the guys with the 18k+ machines can't and won't do. I know of another fellow muching in the are so there's a market for it. I've pm'd Mini about the mower and I will definatly test the waters here to detect a market. This seems to be an area where the mulching/mowing market isn't flooded with many contractors. I want to be versitile enough to survive so I need to stay with what I'm confortable with.

Matt T.;)

ksss
11-09-2008, 02:23 PM
Finance companies are in business to finance.
Most have no other way to generate income.
So if they do not finance then they will go out of business?
I am oversimplifying this but the reality is JD,Bobcat Takeuchi,Cat etc are Dependant on Financing to sell products.
Often times the Interest rate is the deal maker.
So give it a few months of no machine sales and manufacturer stock not getting depleted and mysteriously the financing will re appear.

The economy is a big circle.

I think you are very right. With all the bailout money now available, they (banks and lending organizations) discovered a new problem. No one wants to borrow any money. The OEM's will have to continue to buy down the lending costs to get guys in equipment at least until we start crawling back out of this mess.

AWJ Services
11-09-2008, 02:59 PM
Well, for me Mini hit the the nail on the head. I already have my truck and trailer and the 50d is just too heavy. I plan on getting a mower down the road. I already have a flail mower for my tractor. I've found several small electrical contractors interested in my services for utility trenches. And since I'm an electrician myself utility trenches seems a good fit. I understand what you guys are saying about larger machines but the weight is a factor for me. If the need is the I will but a larger machine. But I'm looking to do the smaller jobs the guys with the 18k+ machines can't and won't do. I know of another fellow muching in the are so there's a market for it. I've pm'd Mini about the mower and I will definatly test the waters here to detect a market. This seems to be an area where the mulching/mowing market isn't flooded with many contractors. I want to be versitile enough to survive so I need to stay with what I'm confortable with.

That machine should fit the bill for you.
Good Luck

JDSKIDSTEER
11-09-2008, 05:25 PM
HEY JD, I was going to say thanks for the sales lead but things don't look good for your customer. Oasis...Which customer?

GradeMan
11-09-2008, 05:49 PM
wow 7200 for a mower head for a mini thats cheap. Who do i call?

GWhunter
11-09-2008, 11:26 PM
Should I maybe consider a 6 month rental and if all goes well purchase then? The winter in New England isn't the time to start a venture like this but I don't think advertising and renting would be too risky. Is a operators license required to run the equipment? I know larger machines need hydralic license's.
My dealer is really pushing the 0% purchase but I really think rent/leasing is the best option now with the economy and slow down in construction. Mini do you mow with your tractor also? What do you charge per hour? Is there any reason not to look into used unit? There's a 35d on ebay with only 450hours. It's really priced competitivly.

Matt T.:usflag:

ksss
11-10-2008, 12:10 AM
Should I maybe consider a 6 month rental and if all goes well purchase then? The winter in New England isn't the time to start a venture like this but I don't think advertising and renting would be too risky. Is a operators license required to run the equipment? I know larger machines need hydralic license's.
My dealer is really pushing the 0% purchase but I really think rent/leasing is the best option now with the economy and slow down in construction. Mini do you mow with your tractor also? What do you charge per hour? Is there any reason not to look into used unit? There's a 35d on ebay with only 450hours. It's really priced competitivly.

Matt T.:usflag:


You could consider an RPO in the Spring and let it take you through next Fall. You should have a good idea on how this will work for you by then. You could start advertising now. Around here they are putting the Yellow Page ads together now and they come out in the Spring if that would be a part of your advertising scheme. If you get some jobs before the start of the RPO, work with your dealer on a good daily rate. You would likely have to purchase a mower attachment if that is what you are going to go into. I would also consider a line of credit as you will likely need it as you get off and running. There can be a bit of delay between laying out the money to do the work and getting paid for said work. The dealer may be pushing for you to take 0% interest, but if this does not work for you, making payments on a machine you are not able to make money with wont do you any good, not to mention due to the slow economy selling the machine on your own may not go well. With an RPO, if you need to bail out of the machine you drop it off at the dealer, settle your rent due and walk away. It is about as safe as it can be. Selling the mower attachment, I think would be easy.

minimax
11-10-2008, 12:16 AM
GradeMan,Those prices are from US mower look on there website and they list prices on there.GWhunter,I mow with every machine I have tractor with rotary cutter,CTL with flail head,mini-x with flail head and a 5' foot front mower.I charge $65 per hour for the tractor.I have looked at the rent/leasing option but it will cost you more money too do that if you can put the hours on the machine,your dealer can break it down all 3 ways,If you are going to mow with the mini-x you will need a case drain and rentals don't have those.
If you can find a used machine in good shape that can be a good way to go,my first mini-x was a used machine but it did have a few problems.
Most used machine you have to pay cash for or get financing though a bank and that can be at rate's of 8.0% and up.

minimax

bobcatuser
11-10-2008, 12:29 AM
You could consider an RPO in the Spring and let it take you through next Fall. You should have a good idea on how this will work for you by then. You could start advertising now. Around here they are putting the Yellow Page ads together now and they come out in the Spring if that would be a part of your advertising scheme. If you get some jobs before the start of the RPO, work with your dealer on a good daily rate. You would likely have to purchase a mower attachment if that is what you are going to go into. I would also consider a line of credit as you will likely need it as you get off and running. There can be a bit of delay between laying out the money to do the work and getting paid for said work. The dealer may be pushing for you to take 0% interest, but if this does not work for you, making payments on a machine you are not able to make money with wont do you any good, not to mention due to the slow economy selling the machine on your own may not go well. With an RPO, if you need to bail out of the machine you drop it off at the dealer, settle your rent due and walk away. It is about as safe as it can be. Selling the mower attachment, I think would be easy.

That's how I would go about starting out. If things are slow the dealer might be inclined to pool rental payments for certain equipment, that way you can get the right Type/Size of machine for any work you find.

AWJ Services
11-10-2008, 01:18 AM
If you can find a used machine in good shape that can be a good way to go,my first mini-x was a used machine but it did have a few problems.
Most used machine you have to pay cash for or get financing though a bank and that can be at rate's of 8.0% and up.

I agree.
It better be cheap.

GradeMan
11-11-2008, 01:08 PM
what's a case drain?
Is that for the mower, or the hyd on the machine

bobcat_ron
11-11-2008, 01:33 PM
what's a case drain?
Is that for the mower, or the hyd on the machine

It's a smaller 3rd line sticking out of a High Flow attachment, it drains off excessive back pressure behind the main shaft seals. Mowers, planers, broom, grinders and basically any attachment that needs to run fast with lots of oil flow needs one, but only on High flow machines.