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Keegan
11-18-2008, 07:50 PM
I was watching one of those garden shows on HGTV over the weekend and the guy was overseeding his lawn just by putting down seed without aerating or slice seeding. Would that really work? Doesn't it need good soil contact?

lawns Etc
11-18-2008, 08:31 PM
It will work but you will not get the percentage of seed to come up you will probally waste about 25% of the seed that will never germinate. But on my own yard I will go and just broadcast seed just before a snow that has always produced for me in the spring.

jsw2008
11-21-2008, 10:07 PM
If its annual ryegrass, it will work fine. That stuff will grow on the sidewalk if you water it.

Smallaxe
11-22-2008, 09:46 AM
Yes it works. KBG or fescue has adequate success. Water makes good soil contact. Works even better with a topdressing of compost.
The simplest thing to do is try it yourself. With irrigation do it anytime with out irrigation do it in the fall or spring for best results.

IA_James
11-22-2008, 09:52 AM
But on my own yard I will go and just broadcast seed just before a snow that has always produced for me in the spring.

That's what I do. Make sure some snow lands on it in the next day or so, otherwise your yard will look like a fricken bird convention.

Whitey4
11-22-2008, 06:36 PM
Lots of caveats on this one I think. If the thatch is thick, it won't work at all. The seed still needs some kind of soil contact. Snow can help it get sort of pressed into the ground, but I've never been a big fan of dormant seeding... crabgrass germinates at 5 degrees cooler than grass, so my spring CB pre-emergent will cause the dormant seeding to fail.

I have seen this work on lawns that had bare dirt spots that the seed could contact, but it's late for that now. Even then, I think 50% germination is the best one could hope for. I still believe in aerating and overseeding every fall.

Smallaxe
11-23-2008, 08:32 AM
We aerated a large area in the woods a couple years ago where there was little grass at all and large ares of bare ground. Threw on some seed. It germinated only around the aeration holes.

hackitdown
11-28-2008, 10:43 AM
It works, but it is better with aeration...and much better slice seeded. I do aeration with broadcast seeding as regular maintainence every September for many customers, the results are excellent, the customers love it. I think it is a very good return on investment for the customer.

muddstopper
12-13-2008, 01:48 PM
Expect about a 5% germination rate for broadcast seed that is spimply spread out on top of the soil. The seed needs good soil contact to do anygood. Irrigation, rainfall, and snow will get some of that seed to the soil and improve germination rates somewhat, but dont expect the results you would get with a properly prepaired seedbed. You can increase seed rates to makeup for the loss germination, on a postage stamp size lawn, the cost increase wouldnt be that much.

corey4671
12-26-2008, 11:48 PM
I overseeded some bermuda lawns this fall with annual ryegrass and I have to say I have been less than thrilled with the results. I know now I PROBABLY should have cut the dormant bermuda back a little shorter. I did plug aerate one yard and the other one the customer wasn't willing to pay the cost to aerate. only wanted the seeding. We had a screwy fall. It was very dry and then we had an early frost. However this month(december) we've had over 16 inches of rain.

jsw2008
12-29-2008, 09:25 PM
The colder than usual weather for us this fall did a number on my(and everone's around here) overseeding and it just doesn't look that great. Right after most companies seeded this year we had 5 inches of rain in 2 days. Then it got cold and the seed that didn't wash away didn't germinate well. The color of the grass this year isn't good either.

Smallaxe
12-30-2008, 07:49 AM
The colder than usual weather for us this fall did a number on my(and everone's around here) overseeding and it just doesn't look that great. Right after most companies seeded this year we had 5 inches of rain in 2 days. Then it got cold and the seed that didn't wash away didn't germinate well. The color of the grass this year isn't good either.

What kind of grass are you talking about?
Up here 5" of rain is going to boost the grasses a lot anytime the ground isn't frozen. You have probably lost a lot of synthetic N as a result of all that water.
How much N do you guys need in the winter there?

jsw2008
12-30-2008, 09:27 PM
annual ryegrass mostly. I usually put down 1/2 pound of n per 1k sq ft about every 2 months while the rye is growing. So basically in November, January and late Feb. You have to stop the fertilizer in March to let the warm season grass break out of dormancy.

Smallaxe
12-31-2008, 09:25 AM
Annual Ryegrass can germinate in less than a week with good moisture. Cool.
So the AR doesn't interfere with the growing of the warm season grasses?
And at this time your warm season grasses are brown.

I wish we could play all year around. :(

jsw2008
12-31-2008, 09:59 AM
Gives us some color in the winter. The ryegrass will dye out when it gets hot. That's why we stop fert in March, when the warm season grass starts to green up. That way the rye won't compete as much with the warm season grass.

Tuna3679
12-31-2008, 03:05 PM
I have always just mowed as short as possible with-out scalping then overseeded, by hand if the yard isn't to large, then water here in Florida, or wait for snow-fall in Indiana, I don't aerate lawns that don't need it, and never before overseeding, the seed gets pushed into the holes from watering and looks ridiculous after sprouting

corey4671
12-31-2008, 07:14 PM
what fert do you recommend for AR?

jsw2008
01-01-2009, 12:58 AM
I'm not real particular about the fertilizer. I use 16-4-8 or 10-10-10 quick release most of the time. Just the ag fertilizer you can get from the feed and seed. You're just trying to get it to green up

corey4671
01-01-2009, 01:37 AM
annual ryegrass mostly. I usually put down 1/2 pound of n per 1k sq ft about every 2 months while the rye is growing. So basically in November, January and late Feb. You have to stop the fertilizer in March to let the warm season grass break out of dormancy.

so what you're saying is a 50 lb bag is covering 100k sq ft?

jsw2008
01-01-2009, 12:57 PM
No. The amount of nitrogen in fertilizer is the first number, so you divide the first number into 100 to get the amt of N in 100 lbs. So there would be 10 lbs of N in 100 lbs of 10-10-10. So to put 1/2 lb of N per 1k sq ft you would have to put 5 lbs per 1k sq ft.

corey4671
01-01-2009, 01:15 PM
No. The amount of nitrogen in fertilizer is the first number, so you divide the first number into 100 to get the amt of N in 100 lbs. So there would be 10 lbs of N in 100 lbs of 10-10-10. So to put 1/2 lb of N per 1k sq ft you would have to put 5 lbs per 1k sq ft.

duh...brainfart on my part :hammerhead:

jsw2008
01-01-2009, 02:43 PM
I had to think about it extra hard today too.:dizzy: