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Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 10:09 PM
Did you guys start right out of high school or did most of you go to college?
Also did anybody start their own company right away or just try to get on with someone else to begin with and then go on your own later? What would you guys think would be the best way to go in these two situations- right out of high school or going to college, and working for someone else or starting up on your own?
I am in college right now and I was wanting to see what other people had done to get into the field that they are in, my dad owns a construction company and I would rather work instead of go to school, but my parents thought that it was important that I go to college.

lkc
11-18-2008, 10:16 PM
Go to school.

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 10:20 PM
i guess if i go to school and finish, i have about one year left I can still go into whatever field I want to and Ill have the college education to fall back on if need be.

RockSet N' Grade
11-18-2008, 10:21 PM
I went to high school. I went 5 years to a junior college.......and during that time I started a business - sold it and started another. I went to junior college because my parents wanted me too and that's where the babes were. I have never been formal education oriented. I have always loved business and hated, despised, reading about it in books when guys were out there doing it and I was fighting for gas money and pb n' j's. If I had to do it again, I would be even more adventuresome and do what I knew I wanted to do......business. It is a tough and rocky road that way and not the easiest way to get there and I am most fortunate in alot of ways to still be among the kicking. Do what you want to do......define it, make a plan to get it and implement the plan. Simple.....

Junior M
11-18-2008, 10:22 PM
I dont want to go to college because I enjoy running the little business we have, but I know going to college will benefit me in the long run, so I am going to go, and plus if the business ever fell out I would have a degree on something to fall back on to try and find a job...

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 10:26 PM
I would rather be working, but I guess that I see what my parents are advocating finishing school and then going into the work world. I have just always been the kind that did not mind working hard and loved being outside in the dirt and getting stuff done. It kills me to have to go to a classroom when the weather is nice. The thing I don't want though is to go to school and then go into something different than i studied in school. Then I think i will feel guilty that I kind of robbed my parents of that money if I don't go into the field that I studied in school.

minimax
11-18-2008, 10:28 PM
I started it high school and never looked back and when I got out of high school I used the money I would of used for college for machines.

minimax

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 10:28 PM
Like you say it will be something to fall back on if I decide to go into a different field than I studied in school, that is a plus.

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 10:30 PM
I would have done something like that but my parents thought that the college education was so important. Did they give you the choice minimax?

Sunscaper
11-18-2008, 10:35 PM
I started after 4 year and change in the service and 1 year in college. I was recently married and started with $200.00 a borrowed pick-up truck and a $10.00 push mower from a garage sale. I don't regret it but i do recommend against doing it this way. I took me a long, long time. 3 years to ever make money. I actually made more money selling my first business after 2.5 years than I ever made in it. College, like anything in life is full of theoretical and real life lessons. Stay the course if you can. Subdue your passions and learn all you can about business. If you need start up capital you look better before an investment group or bank with a degree. this industry like others is about making money. What works in other industries applies to ours also. You are never to old or young to jump in. But your degree may vary the level you jump in at. And more importantly how much profit you and your partners one day make. Ever hear of the business alalogy of hauling buckets versus building a pipeline? Best of luck to you.

ksss
11-18-2008, 10:39 PM
I went to high school. I went 5 years to a junior college.......and during that time I started a business - sold it and started another. I went to junior college because my parents wanted me too and that's where the babes were. I have never been formal education oriented. I have always loved business and hated, despised, reading about it in books when guys were out there doing it and I was fighting for gas money and pb n' j's. If I had to do it again, I would be even more adventuresome and do what I knew I wanted to do......business. It is a tough and rocky road that way and not the easiest way to get there and I am most fortunate in alot of ways to still be among the kicking. Do what you want to do......define it, make a plan to get it and implement the plan. Simple.....


I'll bet your mark is still in the bathroom stall. Curt was here 79', 80', ah sh!t 81 ', who said this was a two year school? 82' damit 83'. Screw it, You people suck, I am outa here.:laugh:

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 10:42 PM
Do you guys think that a future employer would care what the degree was in, or just the fact that you have a degree would make a difference to them. My degree when I get it will be in Journalism, nothing really to do with landscaping or construction lol

raschmid07
11-18-2008, 10:48 PM
I am majoring in Building Science and am depending on my future employer placing a large interest in my major. Having said that, it's not the end of the world if your major isn't in your desired field. Any college degree will always be something good to fall back on and have on your resume. You said you have a year left so this probably wouldn't be feasible, but you might think of switching to business rather than an English major. Either way, it will always help if you have summers, school breaks, etc. of working in construction or excavating on your resume if you plan to go into whichever field.

bobcat_ron
11-18-2008, 10:50 PM
2 months after I dropped out of Grade 11, 17 years old and wanting a piece of the family business. I have no diploma, very little education past grade 9 and there is something in my pants that is very big and makes all the girls drool when I pull it out and I did really good for myself since then.
I started my own business (with dads help and money) in 2003 and a damn expensive accountant.
As long as you get along with your family and their politics and business sense, it's a good start, you can always leave and find something else in the future.

Junior M
11-18-2008, 11:01 PM
Do you guys think that a future employer would care what the degree was in, or just the fact that you have a degree would make a difference to them. My degree when I get it will be in Journalism, nothing really to do with landscaping or construction lol
If you want a career in this industry, I am not even sure what it is called, why are you going to major in journalism?

Scag48
11-18-2008, 11:06 PM
I started in lawn maintenance in high school, sold it 3 years ago when I left for college. Went to college, worked full time at a job I hated, I'm a few credits shy of a 2 year degree and will eventually finish it. With that said, I have no intentions of getting a 4 year degree. Why? Because I have no desire. Not because I'm afraid of what I can learn, more of the fact that I just hate school. Scratch that, I don't hate school, I hate homework. I don't mind going to classes and doing what's required there, but with homework school begins to be a 6-7 hour per day job. I worked full time while I was in college and that was hard. By the time you work a full time job, go to school full time, and then keep yourself fed and then maybe do some homework and try to toss a social life in there, it's difficult. Had my parents paid for me to go to school or I scored a loan to attend a university where all I did was school and didn't need to work, I think I could've managed that. On the flip side, that's even more homework than a junior college and I probably would've wasted a bunch of time and money.

My chosen profession does not require a degree in anything. It sure wouldn't hurt anyone to have a degree doing what I do, absolutely not, but as an operator I could eventually be moved up to a foreman with my current education. There are foremen out there with little to no education and are moved up in the company. If you want to get hired on as a foreman, yeah, you'll probably need some credentials. Like I said, I will never discourage anyone from education. I myself will eventually finish my 2 year degree and call it good. As an apprentice, I feel this is a good education as well, even though it's not technically recognized anywhere as formal schooling. My ultimate goal in life is self employment. Been there about 3 different times, once in high school with a lawn maintenance biz, started maintenance again last spring but got out due to my union run, and I assisted my dad in an excavation endeavour in '06 that I operated on my own with few management errors. I feel that education is important, my dad has a 4 year degree in Business Management and if I was to get a 4 year degree, that's what I'd get. However, I feel that if I ever wanted to run a business for myself again, I think I can do it with what I've learned thus far and I'll only learn more from here. I learn by watching, my dad has taught me alot of business sense which has helped. I think for excavation, there really isn't that much to running these businesses, the only challenging thing for me is the accounting part of things and that's not even that bad. There are a lot of young guys out there my age who are doing pretty damn well for themselves with no formal education. I think generalities should be thrown out, a lot of people say you can't run a business without a 4 year degree. There are plenty of people who fail without one but there are success stories as well.

To answer your question about what type of degree and employability, I don't think it matters unless you're up against someone who does have a degree in said industry and you don't. Most employers just look at the fact that you went but will prefer degrees within the industry.

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 11:08 PM
When I graduated high school I did not know what I wanted to do and I was thinking about getting a degree in landscape design, or journalism since my parents felt that college was necessary. I would have rather gone to work, but that was not an option. Now I think that I can get my degree in Journalism and see what direction that takes me in. There are plenty of people that do not go into the field that they got a degree in i'm sure, but if I decide not to at least I will have a fall back later.

Scag48
11-18-2008, 11:13 PM
Let me ask you this. Have you worked in construction before? Only reason I ask is that you may find that you do not like it if you haven't tried it out. It wouldn't hurt to have a degree in something outside the construction industry if you find out for some reason you want or absolutely have to get out in the future (i.e. injuries, etc..). The journalism degree won't hurt you, I can assure you. Depends on the job you're looking for, though. If you're looking to start out as an operator, you're probably going to have more education than all applicants, so the type of degree you carry is irrelevant when it comes to getting hired. If you're looking to get hired for a management position in the industry, the journalism degree may hinder you a little, but don't get discouraged if that's the case. Some employers look for diversity in education, that may play in your favor.

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 11:16 PM
Right, that is why I am going to stick it out and finish school. That way I can have something to fall back on.

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 11:19 PM
What are the requirements for going into running heavy equipment? Do most guys that do that kind of work get some kind of degree, or do they have to go to a trade school of some kind?

ksss
11-18-2008, 11:21 PM
there is something in my pants that is very big and makes all the girls drool when I pull it out.


Let me guess, daddy's platinium card?

When you take these lady's home (to mom and dad's home) is that kinda creepy. I mean the overpowering smell of High Karate aftershave, the pheramone candle burning on the coffee table, You and Susie rotten crotch dry lovin on the couch while mom and dad sit side by side in the twin Lazy boys watching Leno, and giving you and Susie words of encouragement, and suggestions. It must be some sight to behold.:laugh:

Junior M
11-18-2008, 11:23 PM
You have to start at the bottom. Thats the way most companies work. I believe Scag started running rollers for his company, and when he was laid off was checking grade with GPS or something like that...

Junior M
11-18-2008, 11:25 PM
Let me guess, daddy's platinium card?

When you take these lady's home (to mom and dad's home) is that kinda creepy. I mean the overpowering smell of High Karate aftershave, the pheramone candle burning on the coffee table, You and Susie rotten crotch dry lovin on the couch while mom and dad sit side by side in the twin Lazy boys watching Leno, and giving you and Susie words of encouragement, and suggestions. It must be some sight to behold.:laugh:
BAD MENTAL IMAGE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :cry:

Not cool KSSShttp://smileys.on-my-web.com/repository/Unhappy/thumb-down-012.gif:nono: not at all!

Scag48
11-18-2008, 11:28 PM
What are the requirements for going into running heavy equipment?

Don't be stupid, rule #1 in my book. Some people aren't cut out to be operators just because they can't understand what's going on. I grew up on farm tractors running around some fairly steep slopes that taught me to use my butt cheeks in order to keep all 4 on the ground. I was lucky enough to gain that experience at a very young age and I'm grateful for that, there is no room for error in an orchard given the tight working space. There is a lot more to operating than just running the machine. Being decent with math helps, reading plans, etc.. Simply put, if you're a moron, you won't survive. I don't think you'll have that problem seeing as how you made it through 4 years of college. However, that doesn't necessarily mean you'll be good on equipment, either. A balance between being book smart and just flat being good at running iron is the best, not everyone can attain that, though.

I went to my initial apprenticeship training this spring with 50 other selected apprentices. Most of them, except for about 10 of us, had little to no experience on equipment. It can be learned, but there are stages. Some guys are good on everything, some guys are good on a piece or two, then some guys suck at everything and eventually get fired so many times they call it quits. Our trainers told us that before we started and I'll bet that out of 50 there will be at least 10 that will bail due to lack of skill no matter how hard they try, 30 will be good on a couple pieces, the remaining 10 out of 50 will be good on just about everything. I am working toward being the latter, but only time will tell with my dozer skills. I'm figuring it out but only have about 100 hours on dozer. Loader and excavator I have figured out, backhoe I still need to learn some tricks, dozer I have a long way to go. Blade I want to learn, but that's a whole other animal within itself.

Starting at the bottom is a must. When I say that, you may be an operator and not a laborer, which isn't bad, but you'll be doing crap work. I started running roller for the last company I was with. Before I got laid off for the season I was grade checking, which in itself isn't that difficult, but the operator I worked with and myself made zero mistakes and I was recognized for that. So, you may not start out doing exactly what you want. I'd love to get in a big hoe and load trucks all day but I know it isn't going to happen right off the bat. I still have another good year of crap assignments before I end up getting my own machine.

crab
11-18-2008, 11:37 PM
High karate that is to funny!!! .im old. started running tractors when i was twelve,to dumb to anything but this hi ya

crab
11-18-2008, 11:41 PM
sorry left out a word or 2.:canadaflag:

RockSet N' Grade
11-18-2008, 11:45 PM
Ksss........are you sure it is hi-karate or old spice? bad-bad-bad mental image......

Scag48
11-18-2008, 11:47 PM
Kaiser, have you ever thought about writing for a bad sit-com? That visual was too much.

Bleed Green
11-18-2008, 11:48 PM
Thanks for the information scag, i am trying to learn as much as i can about various different fields and angles of the industry

coopers
11-19-2008, 08:05 AM
Okay, the mental images I get sometimes from Ron and KSSS are just wrong. :laugh:

bobcat_ron
11-19-2008, 11:47 AM
Let me guess, daddy's platinium card?

When you take these lady's home (to mom and dad's home) is that kinda creepy. I mean the overpowering smell of High Karate aftershave, the pheramone candle burning on the coffee table, You and Susie rotten crotch dry lovin on the couch while mom and dad sit side by side in the twin Lazy boys watching Leno, and giving you and Susie words of encouragement, and suggestions. It must be some sight to behold.:laugh:


Where the hell have I heard that before? :laugh:

minimax
11-19-2008, 07:36 PM
Bleed Green,They gave me the choice to go to college or not.And I thought Ron was talking about a big turd in his pants.

minimax

bobcat_ron
11-19-2008, 08:03 PM
And I thought Ron was talking about a big turd in his pants.

minimax


That's what makes those screwed up German girls smile. :dizzy:

YellowDogSVC
11-19-2008, 09:08 PM
I did a stint in EMS and then went back to college and then started my business and finished college at night to get a bachelor of science in business management. It's a long way from where I started..I was going to be an orthopedic surgeon or an English lit teacher. Shoulda statyed in school and learned more about computers. :)

Dirt Digger2
11-19-2008, 09:22 PM
i wanted to do nothing but work too...I had just got "promoted" to equipment operator between high school and college so my freshman year was especially rough, knowing that i could be running iron rather then sitting in a plastic chair listening to some bald professor teach me about physics

now i am a Senior in Civil Engineering...it has been a rough ride at times, but looking back everything was worth it...the friends i made, the connections i made, the good times i had

college isn't just about getting an education, its also about an experience you can't get anywhere else...i was extremely shy when i graduated high school, through my experiences in college i now find myself talking with people i never thought i would have, which will help one day when i go on my own because i have gained confidence in myself these last 4 years

I just interviewed with one of the largest heavy civil contractors on the east coast yesterday and it went very well...part of which has to do with my background but another part because i am so outgoing and apparently make a a good first impression on people...hopefully they will get back to me...but like some of these other guys are saying...an education..especially when times are rough like this will always be worthwhile...think about it, whats 4 years of your life anyway in the grand scheme of things?

RockSet N' Grade
11-19-2008, 09:30 PM
To follow up with DirtDigger: during this time of rapid change and uncertainty, it may be one of the wisest choices out there to do the college thing. As I have thought about this over some time, if I had a son who was work or school age, that is the advise I would give him. Do the school, if you want to do "business" school allows you time to start something on the side to test the waters. If you don't like your major, it is easy to switch......once you are in the work force, it is not easy to switch right now. It is a shark pool out there and folks are hungry, real hungry for any kind of income. After reviewing what I just wrote and thinking about it - school would be my choice hands down.....

Dirt Digger2
11-19-2008, 09:36 PM
To follow up with DirtDigger: during this time of rapid change and uncertainty, it may be one of the wisest choices out there to do the college thing. As I have thought about this over some time, if I had a son who was work or school age, that is the advise I would give him. Do the school, if you want to do "business" school allows you time to start something on the side to test the waters. If you don't like your major, it is easy to switch......once you are in the work force, it is not easy to switch right now. It is a shark pool out there and folks are hungry, real hungry for any kind of income. After reviewing what I just wrote and thinking about it - school would be my choice hands down.....

right....you might be a shy kid like myself coming out of gradeschool and never put yourself into situations in which you are required to be more outgoing then normal

in college you are FORCED to get into those situations...whether they be assigned group projects or anything like that...you gain confidence little by little until one night you go out to a bar and take the best looking girl home...wake up the next morning and think to yourself "sh*t I can do anything"

once you have confidence you will be able to make business decisions, make connections, close deals, sell products, etc...

maybe you already think you are "confident", maybe you already take home the best looking girls, but i wasn't and now am...all thanks to college

(a lot of it has to do with getting out of home too and being by yourself...maybe why those Canadians are a bunch of nancys that don't stand up for themselves and bring the uglys back to momma :usflag: HAHAHA)

Junior M
11-19-2008, 09:49 PM
(a lot of it has to do with getting out of home too and being by yourself...maybe why those Canadians are a bunch of nancys that don't stand up for themselves and bring the uglys back to momma :usflag: HAHAHA)

The first thing I thought of when you said what was Ronny!*trucewhiteflag*


I am kind of opposite of you Dirt, I am the shy quiet one at school around all the other teenagers, but put me on a job with grown men, and mature adults and I am talking to them, asking questions, I feel it is alot easier to talk to an adult than someone in my class at school...

coopers
11-19-2008, 10:08 PM
I was kinda like you junior...I didn't associate much with people my own age. I was always around adults and found it much more relaxing to have a mature conversation with them and not worry about trying to talk to an idiot my age. Now it's not so bad...there are actually mature 23 year olds but I still find myself gravitating toward older people to be around and speak with. It has helped me get to where I am now with my job, continues to help me every second in my job and it'll work with me in the future. Similar to digger. I agree with everyone, college helps you as a person on many different levels. It's worth taking advantage of.

Junior M
11-19-2008, 10:15 PM
I was kinda like you junior...I didn't associate much with people my own age. I was always around adults and found it much more relaxing to have a mature conversation with them and not worry about trying to talk to an idiot my age. Now it's not so bad...there are actually mature 23 year olds but I still find myself gravitating toward older people to be around and speak with. It has helped me get to where I am now with my job, continues to help me every second in my job and it'll work with me in the future. Similar to digger. I agree with everyone, college helps you as a person on many different levels. It's worth taking advantage of.
Being this way has helped me alot in my side job and with the work for myself, I can't stand school, I dont mind the work, or being there its all the immature people, they wont just do the work and go on with their lives they insist on being hard headed and not doing it getting everyone else in trouble, ok sorry thats another topic sorry for the minor hijack..

I think I would just go to school, like me and many others said earlier, it will give you something to fall back on when the economy falls out and everybody and there brother in this industry is struggling for a job...

minimax
11-19-2008, 10:37 PM
I was kinda like you junior...I didn't associate much with people my own age. I was always around adults and found it much more relaxing to have a mature conversation with them and not worry about trying to talk to an idiot my age. Now it's not so bad...there are actually mature 23 year olds but I still find myself gravitating toward older people to be around and speak with. It has helped me get to where I am now with my job, continues to help me every second in my job and it'll work with me in the future.

I was the same and still the same now at age 24.

minimax

coopers
11-19-2008, 10:42 PM
I was the same and still the same now at age 24.

minimax

Yeah I have maybe a handful of friends that are my age and a couple years younger. Most of my friends are in their 30's and the oldest is mid 60's! haha. But it helps too...that way I walk into say, the Kubota dealership (last wknd) I carry myself well and don't seem like a flake young buck.

Junior M
11-19-2008, 10:47 PM
Yeah I have maybe a handful of friends that are my age and a couple years younger. Most of my friends are in their 30's and the oldest is mid 60's! haha. But it helps too...that way I walk into say, the Kubota dealership (last wknd) I carry myself well and don't seem like a flake young buck.
I have people I associate with at school but not alot of them I would consider friends.. A friend of mine in Ohio is almost 60, a guy I hang out with on a regular basis is in his 30's...

Yard Green
11-20-2008, 09:47 PM
Speaking from experience I would definately go to school and get a degree. Think about it, you can learn a lot about how to run a business and handle the finances of it and be much better off. Trust me, it is those that know more than just how to cut grass, plant trees and plants etc. that are truly successful at business. Also if it doesn't pan out you can get another job, in today's world they want you to have a 4 year degree to be a salesman. I don't get it.