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RockSet N' Grade
11-28-2008, 08:41 PM
Have a ranch in Az. that has couple miles of road that continue to get potholed, washboarded......They have a tractor so it would be a 3 point attachment. Road Master, RoadRunner, Road Boss are the units I am looking at. What do you guys think would be the best unit of those 3 or is there one out there that may be better?

stuvecorp
11-28-2008, 09:13 PM
I would love to try the Roadrunner. It looks like it works well in the videos but real world, who knows?

wanabe
11-28-2008, 10:34 PM
I just use a 9 foot 3 point blade on mine. Bushhog model 121 with 3 hydraulic cylinders, and i even have the box blade ends that bolt on. The blade is heavy in really cuts, and the blade ends hold all the rock in and fills the low spots. The 3 hyd cylinders allow me to crown the road, and pull the rock back up where you need it.

YellowDogSVC
11-29-2008, 01:13 AM
I have a road runner. It does a good job. ABout 1/3 cost of skid steer grader and much more durable. Easy to handle. Would work best with CTL or behind a large tractor. If you get the option, get the hydraulic screw jack versus manual.

Gravel Rat
11-29-2008, 02:05 AM
A blade for the front and wheel wobblies for the rear.

I knew one guy he had a old chunk of 12 inch H Beam he had weighted and pulled it behind his P/U truck.

I think if you want a grade job that is going to last have a contractor with a grader come in and give the road a shave every year.

RockSet N' Grade
11-29-2008, 10:10 AM
YellowDog........is the hydraulic roller on the RoadRunner worth the addition?

Construct'O
11-29-2008, 11:01 AM
I like the Roadrunner,but for potholes you might need to have a ripper to scarif the road bed.

Roadrunner would be faster because of the distance(length) of the road,but for filling holes, boxscraper with the ripper teeth would also be nice.

As stated before if you need to move material any distance the boxscraper will carry it farther to where it is needed.Too a limit of course:rolleyes:

You need to to have rock(gravel) to move around to do any real good for potholes.Here there usually isn't enough gravel to move back and forth to fill the holes.

So first gravel the road !!!!!!:):usflag:

YellowDogSVC
11-29-2008, 12:39 PM
YellowDog........is the hydraulic roller on the RoadRunner worth the addition?

Can't answer that but I doubt it. I think it would make it heavy on anything but a large tractor. On loose soils, the roadrunner can pick up ALOT of material. Add in the nearly 1200lb weight and you have a heavy load. I would skip the roller and rent a skid steer compactor at the very least.
What the ground like? We spread crushed gravel, caliche, and drainfield rock with the road runner. It will pull up rocks out of a road, however, and those will need to be removed by hand if there are too many larger ones. Because the roadrunner is like a box blade, it keeps the material inside until it spills over the blades. Larger rocks will usually keep moving with the grader. I move them to sides of road and just pick them up or kick them out later. Usually not too many come up because you can set it to "shave" the road instead of deep grading.

YellowDogSVC
11-29-2008, 12:40 PM
I like the Roadrunner,but for potholes you might need to have a ripper to scarif the road bed.

Roadrunner would be faster because of the distance(length) of the road,but for filling holes, boxscraper with the ripper teeth would also be nice.

As stated before if you need to move material any distance the boxscraper will carry it farther to where it is needed.Too a limit of course:rolleyes:

You need to to have rock(gravel) to move around to do any real good for potholes.Here there usually isn't enough gravel to move back and forth to fill the holes.

So first gravel the road !!!!!!:):usflag:

Roadrunner offers a rezloh blade for the front blade now which, I've heard, can help scarify if used properly.

RockSet N' Grade
11-29-2008, 12:41 PM
Gotcha Constructo on the material end. We have someone doing general length/width measurements as we speak and negotiating to have bulk material moved on site before this little adventure begins. Just looking for the best implement to provide them with that they can use with the equipment they have on hand to do the preliminary job and maintenance/upkeep down the road. Interesting project for me to organize over emails and phone calls without being on site to do the work my self........If I was there to do it, it would all be done by now........but that is not the case........so the adventure continues.....thanks all for the input....

RockSet N' Grade
11-29-2008, 12:43 PM
Yes, they offer a rezloh option which I will get when I order the rascal come Monday or Tuesday. Will make sure to add the side hydraulics too......

jmf
11-29-2008, 12:46 PM
I've been told the Harley Rake levels and fills roads.

jmf

RockSet N' Grade
11-29-2008, 03:22 PM
jmf.......i am familiar with the harley. it won't stand up for very long for what is intended and it is far more expensive to repair and initial purchase price is 3-4 times more than this implement.

bobcatexc
11-29-2008, 04:05 PM
Anybody use those rezloh cutting edges on their skidsteer buckets. I'd like to know how well they work scraping and cleaning material off concrete or asphalt.

bobcat_ron
11-29-2008, 04:23 PM
Anybody use those rezloh cutting edges on their skidsteer buckets. I'd like to know how well they work scraping and cleaning material off concrete or asphalt.

They work best if the cutting edge is flat on the ground with the bucket back end off the ground, if the cutting edge is even 2 degrees off flat, material will go through the "fingers", but I have seen them used on loaders in gravel and rock conditions and they scream through the tough stuff faster and smoother than a smooth edge.
A lot of the excavators in Alberta use them and the operators swear by them, they have hard clay and soils there.

CAT powered
11-29-2008, 04:51 PM
I'd use a standard box scraper. That's how I do all my dirt road maintenance. I've got a Ford 2120 with a box scraper and loader on the front. It does all the dirt road maintenance around my 100 acre farm.

AWJ Services
11-29-2008, 06:36 PM
http://www.landpride.com/products/prod_bb/prod_mr35.html

I have a Gill that looks like this.
It ways a ton.
It will hold a Yard of material.
It has scarifier teeth that drop down and cut if needed.
Here if the implement is not super heavy it will do nothing.
I can do it in a hurry with my Skid steer and a tooth bucket.

The roadrunner attachment would work well on smoothing soft ground or gravel but the 3 way Box blade Like I own can do many things.

Bob Horrell
12-01-2008, 10:56 PM
I have had a Roadrunner for a little over 4 years now. I have it set up to pull behind my skiploader, or push in front of my skidsteer. For roads and finish grading large areas, it is the best. In these cases it is far superior to a box scraper. In smaller areas, like finish grading around a new home, the box scraper is better.
I got mine with the hydraulics on one side. That definitely is a must have. I didn't get the roller because I didn't think it would add that much.
I went through the skid plates pretty fast the first time. They come with a small amount of hard facing on them. When I got the second set, I added a bunch of hard facing before installing them and they are still going strong.
I am always finding new ways to use the Roadrunner and save time. It is great for spreading topsoil. For that, I use it on the front of the skid. The size I have will hold 2 yards of material if it is moist. You can really spread a lot of material very accurately and quickly.
I build a lot of horse arenas and find it to be absolutely the fastest tool for finish grading them. There is a small learning curve regarding how deep to set the blades, depending upon what kind of job you are doing. For instance, for a badly washboarded road you would set them a little deeper than for one that just has some uneveness or small ruts. Where a box scraper tends to ride over the tops of the washboard, the angled blades of the roadrunner, when set up properly, cuts the washboard to the base.
The unit is built tough and is well worth the money I spent. I don't think you would be unhappy in any way with purchase of one. Bert Currin (owner and designer at Roadrunner) is a good guy.

SiteSolutions
12-01-2008, 11:05 PM
jmf.......i am familiar with the harley. it won't stand up for very long for what is intended and it is far more expensive to repair and initial purchase price is 3-4 times more than this implement.

I have used my Harley rake on a couple different long driveways with good results. It does a great job of scarifying and leveling. Mine has hydraulic angle on it so it helps to windrow material back to the crown instead of losing it to the edges.

The three point / PTO drive versions are cheaper than the quick tach / hydraulic ones. But maybe not by enough to justify it?

As for reliability, I haven't done enough of it to be able to say for sure, but it seems to like it as well as (if not better than) trying to bust up hard red dirt.

I am working a driveway refurb this week and do not have the rake; we are spreading and grading new stone on the drive. I wish I had the rake because it seems to be taking a relatively long time to get a good smooth grade using just the 4-in-1... I am learning a lot of new techniques and getting a lot of practice, though. The rake kinda spoils you.

tacoma7583
12-02-2008, 10:06 PM
Does anyone have links to video of the roadrunner in action?

RockSet N' Grade
12-03-2008, 12:31 AM
tacoma.......if ya call the chap that owns the company he will send you out a dvd or tape. I should be getting mine tomorrow or the next day. He is pretty cool.......I wanted to buy the unit, yet he encouraged me to wait, watch the video and then make the purchase.........first time I have had that happen.