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chrisvinky
12-04-2008, 06:23 PM
I have a residential lawn customer who asked me to design and install her front landscape.

I have always done my own property, but have never done landscaping commercially. I feel like I have an eye for it and that is where my passion is. I would like to transition one day to strictly landscaping.

Some of the plants I am thinking of are -

Arborvitae, Pyramid
Gold flame spirea
dwarf japanese holly
english lavender
liriope
dwarf variated weigela
green velvet boxwood

I have come up with a couple of different designs and I am still playing around with ideas. I thought some of you could give me some ideas and/or constructive criticism.

This is the house as it is with nothing in the front

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd249/chrisvinky/20081045.jpg

chrisvinky
12-04-2008, 06:25 PM
another angle

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd249/chrisvinky/20081046.jpg

chrisvinky
12-04-2008, 06:29 PM
This is my favorite design so far. It has japanese hollies, gold flame spirea and english lavender.

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd249/chrisvinky/harris3.jpg

chrisvinky
12-04-2008, 06:35 PM
This is my first design. After looking at it for a while, I decided it wasn't what I wanted.

It has japanese holly and gold flame spirea on the left and dwarf weigela with dwarf korean lilac on the right

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd249/chrisvinky/harris4.jpg

Lawnworks
12-04-2008, 06:49 PM
Landscape Pro! You should sell this one!

I would want more of a plant grouping in 3s or 5s. I am not a big fan of spirea on foundation plantings since they are deciduous and have no foilage in the winter. What about goldmop? Loropetalum would look good against that foundation as well. Some annual beds along the front entry would look good as well.

PerfectEarth
12-04-2008, 07:15 PM
Stay away from alternating plants like that- You want to mass in groups. Use more hright items in appropriate areas. Try a two-level planting and not one row of stuff. Think textures! Sometimes a house like that difficult to landscape- there are no existing items to work off of... and with a blank slate, you can certainly fill it in which equals $$$$....do you have a budget??

EagleLandscape
12-04-2008, 08:29 PM
that place is a blank canvas for anything. i would try and stay away from the typical "symmetrical" feel of what you have. think of something more abstract. larger bed coming out on the left side, since that portion of the house is wider. things of that nature.

anyone can design a bed that sits 6-8' off the foundation of the house. its a good start, but get pretty creative. maybe some dwarf trees surrounded by understory ground cover, that mimics the outline of the beds. massings and groups are good. put some more interest along the left side near the door. it will give people something to look at while they are waiting for the home owners to answer the doors. lambs ear, seasonal color, something with a weird texture.

Penscape Landscaping
12-04-2008, 09:16 PM
you first design is better. I agree on the spirea it looks awesome in the season but terrible in off. I would prob consider Rosa Knockout in the front of that home. On the right hand side i would place an Jap maple or possible a topiary of some sort maybe pom pom. Great work though! Do you like that program and how much?

ARGOS
12-04-2008, 10:08 PM
I want to get to...

ARGOS
12-04-2008, 10:09 PM
Page 2 so that I can...

ARGOS
12-04-2008, 10:10 PM
Give you my personal thoughts....

ARGOS
12-04-2008, 10:11 PM
forget it I give up. I can't take this wide screen. My opinion is limited anyway.

chrisvinky
12-04-2008, 10:20 PM
Landscape Pro! You should sell this one!

I would want more of a plant grouping in 3s or 5s. I am not a big fan of spirea on foundation plantings since they are deciduous and have no foilage in the winter. What about goldmop? Loropetalum would look good against that foundation as well. Some annual beds along the front entry would look good as well.

I like the look of that goldmop especially if I can get one that is 4'-6' tall. I like the Loropetalum, but from what I saw, it was for zones 7 - 10. I'm in 6.

Stay away from alternating plants like that- You want to mass in groups. Use more hright items in appropriate areas. Try a two-level planting and not one row of stuff. Think textures! Sometimes a house like that difficult to landscape- there are no existing items to work off of... and with a blank slate, you can certainly fill it in which equals $$$$....do you have a budget??

Haven't really discussed budget. She just said that she wanted a dozen or so plants across the front with the mulch. I do know that another gut gave her a qoute of about $3000 or $4000 and she about flipped out. I'm not really sure how to price this. I'll have to search for that

you first design is better. I agree on the spirea it looks awesome in the season but terrible in off. I would prob consider Rosa Knockout in the front of that home. On the right hand side i would place an Jap maple or possible a topiary of some sort maybe pom pom. Great work though! Do you like that program and how much?

I like the program so far. I haven't really had the time to play with it like I would like to, but it seems pretty easy to use. BTW, VERY EXPENSIVE! But if it sells a couple of jobs, it paid for itself.

Thanks for the suggestions!

EagleLandscape
12-05-2008, 12:55 PM
to do that house properly, it would be a minimum of 4k.

I am not trying to be a jerk and stand on a box and say we only do expensive jobs, because that is not the case. but that house is wide also, and by the time bed prep is done, proper planting, and mulching. it would start at 4k, and I could easily turn it into 10k-15k depending on what size containers you would use.

Lawnworks
12-05-2008, 05:48 PM
to do that house properly, it would be a minimum of 4k.

I am not trying to be a jerk and stand on a box and say we only do expensive jobs, because that is not the case. but that house is wide also, and by the time bed prep is done, proper planting, and mulching. it would start at 4k, and I could easily turn it into 10k-15k depending on what size containers you would use.

Sounds like she will not go for 4k though. If he had the time, maybe he could come up with two quotes... one economical and one nicer. He could probably come up with a decent economical design using 3-gallon material and a few 7 gallon material for $2000-2500, and be in and out in one day.

AGLA
12-05-2008, 06:20 PM
The right way to do it, in my opinion, is to discuss what she wants and then calculate the price for that. If it is too much, you let her know that you can reduce the amount of material, the size or quality of the material, or the scope of the job.

It is not your job to stretch her budget at your expense. You will already be doing more work to jump through hoops to adjust the job by reducing it to make it more affordable (and less net profit). That is an investment of your time if you need the work, so although not ideal, it makes sense if you are short on work and have time on your hands.

These tight budget projects from the get go, only get worse as they move forward. The more you give in, the more they will press you for more and hold out on you later. You give them the impression (usually a true impression) that you value the job more than they do.

Lance L
12-06-2008, 02:34 PM
if she is on a tight budget phase it out, to add more to complete the 10k job through out the year. 2-3k start, prep, mulch, enough plants to make it look decent, add the good color and more expensive plants as time passes, in 1-2k batches.

and like agla said dont let her push you, if she doesnt have the money for you to do it, then let her find a scrub to do it. people will share the fact that you work for cheap with their neighbors and everyone will expect you to do the cheap work, not what you want

White Gardens
12-06-2008, 11:22 PM
Holy Large photos Batman.:dizzy:

The only thing I would consider is doing something symmetrical at the front door. Balance it with the same configuration on each side. The eye is always drawn to the front door, and you want to frame it in.

Otherwise, I like the idea that was thrown out, to do groupings in the rest of the landscape.

The best shrub garden I have seen has used Barberry, spireas, and blue spruce bushes, and maybe a taller Alberta spruce in the back. The colors in the summer look amazing together.

JNyz
12-07-2008, 06:03 PM
Yellow and reds should be used as focal points

BCFLawnLandscape
12-08-2008, 11:35 AM
I'd put more height between the Windows where you have large amounts of space. A Globosa on stander, surrounded by crimson pigmy barberries is a great look.

pullingrass
12-17-2008, 08:23 PM
feel free to take a look at my design & install portfolio for some ideas.. this could be a good money making job so get some plants in there.... I use pro landscape as well and there are tons of plants... use more then 3 different kinds for this size of project...

I'm working on a page right now for my site for contractors that would like to do a garden install but don't have the ideas to buy my design service..... not up and running yet though

Mike

www.thedetailededge.com