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RockSet N' Grade
12-06-2008, 12:52 AM
I am posting this because I need this as much as anyone else....to readjust my strategy. I have a great friend who I have traded work with over the years who was 90 days out in paying me. I mailed and emailed him today saying this was strictly business, but I need the money by Monday AM in full or I will be filing small claims Monday PM. I have been in this business through two tough cycles and this is the third, but this one "feels" more severe. So, here is my post to me: If you used to bill every 30 days, bill every two weeks or you will not survive. If you do a day job and are used to going home and billing, sit in your truck, make out the bill and collect the money right then and there or you will not survive. If you do any job and do not file preliminary lien work before you start the job, you will not survive. Instead of getting a 50% deposit and then the balance at the end of the job, the new rule is get 50%, then 25%, then 25% on day of completion. If you work on an ongoing job and have to supply materials, the materials will be paid for COD. These are just a few of the things I need to adjust to and implement because I plan on being here doing what I love next year and the year after that.......There are no excuses to be strung out.

ricky86
12-06-2008, 01:09 AM
And I hope you can stick with it. Most will quit because of a couple of lost jobs. I work at a dealership, and am trying to implement a similar philosophy with our customers. This line of "I'll be in next week" HAS TO STOP. And, I think you realize he aint no friend

Gravel Rat
12-06-2008, 02:42 AM
You think you have it bad h*ll the contractors here wait up to 6 months to get paid. My famillies company has waited a year to get paid from people.

The excavation contractors here have gone to the persons house to ask for money. Or see them in the grocery store asking for money. Chase the people all over the neighbourhood asking when they are going to pay their bill.

Now that money is getting tight and the bills are piling up people are going on the never pay plan.

The only way you get paid is harrass the people till they pay. Go knock on their door at dinner time everyday till they pay the bill.

Small claims court is a waste of time because you end up spending money to get your money.

It is down to COD for some people.

Good Luck

coopers
12-06-2008, 05:49 AM
Sorry you have to go through that. That is not fun. I agree with your updated practice of getting money sooner. It's not uncommon to bill out at 30 but why suffer. Unless you're huge and have other revenue coming in, you gotta do what you gotta do. 90 days is way too excessive IMHO.

Junior M
12-06-2008, 06:40 AM
You think you have it bad h*ll the contractors here wait up to 6 months to get paid. My famillies company has waited a year to get paid from people.

The excavation contractors here have gone to the persons house to ask for money. Or see them in the grocery store asking for money. Chase the people all over the neighbourhood asking when they are going to pay their bill.

Now that money is getting tight and the bills are piling up people are going on the never pay plan.

The only way you get paid is harrass the people till they pay. Go knock on their door at dinner time everyday till they pay the bill.

Small claims court is a waste of time because you end up spending money to get your money.

It is down to COD for some people.

Good Luck
GR, my family has yet to get paid on directional drill shots we did back in 2000, and 2001. But we cant do anything about it because all the guys have went bankrupt under the business name and came back under a different one so technically the first business owed Dad money and when they went bankrupt it was just forgotten...

We usually make up a contract saying what we will do and if this happens it will cost you this much more and if its a job that requires some material and alot of time just to get the job started we will work one full day and then get our deposit. Not getting pay does sucks, bad. We always get the check when we leave the job, no hey come back tomorrow and get it unless we make that decision..

bobcat_ron
12-06-2008, 11:04 AM
We don't have problems like that here, only if the bill gets higher than $20,000 - $50,000, but we just lien the hell out of the owner or it's written in the contract that payments must be made by specific dates or lump sums no later than a specified date after the contract.
Only 1 time have we had an issue, and the case was thrown out of court, we won.
As for me, I am now on a monthly payment system between my brother, or he will pay a lump sum before so he can skip a month, but I still have an income from my Dad's side too that never drys out entirely.

ricky86
12-06-2008, 12:39 PM
Sorry you have to go through that. That is not fun. I agree with your updated practice of getting money sooner. It's not uncommon to bill out at 30 but why suffer. Unless you're huge and have other revenue coming in, you gotta do what you gotta do. 90 days is way too excessive IMHO.

It doesn't matter if the company is large. There is no free money. Excuse me, except "Bailout Money".

stuvecorp
12-06-2008, 12:41 PM
I usually do the 50-50 thing, for some repeat customers I let that slide but not much. I usually tell them my accountant wants it like this and I get no complaints. I have had just a few problems and it was with other contractors, that 'next week I'll stop by' is a joke, but that is how they operate. One thing that has helped me is my hardscape supplier, when I get projects that are very big or drawn out I ask if my 30 days can be till I get my completion check and they will let it ride but I make sure they get their money as soon as possible.

It sucks that you have to jump thru hoops to get the money.

Gravel Rat
12-06-2008, 01:30 PM
There has been a few companies in the area that owed multiple companies 50 grand or more each. The company that owed everybody money went bankrupt.

The best way of getting paid is keep bugging the person that owes you money. Every month they are late add 10% of the total to the bill. State on your bill interest charges are added past due 30 days.

You get the larger companies you phone the office and you always get the run a around. The secretary is just the hand puppet. I know one company that went through quite a few secretarys because they get tired of the stress and lying all the time to the bill collectors.

The excavation contractors here say the worst thing about the job is the battle to get paid. Constantly fighting with the homeowners for money.

People shop at different grocery stores to avoid running into the contractor(s) they owe money too.

You really have to watch now with people so strapped for money they can just walk away from their property or project and claim bankrupt and your left holding the bag. Any large projects you want to get a draw for half of the project or for the materials. If the homeowner doesn't want to pay for the materials stop the job now because you know d*mn well they don't have the money.

There has been a few houses in the area where the homeowner wasn't paying the bills now the house sits 3/4s done nobody will work for the homeowner unless its cash money at the end of the day.

It is bad everywhere with people wanting work done and not pay for it. Like I said with people so stretched out for money they can claim personal bankruptsy any day.

Anytime I do work for a homeowner I don't know its COD. Sure my bills are small with 500 dollars usually the highest bill. I'am not getting stiffed.

J. Peterson Grading
12-06-2008, 01:36 PM
Personally I like where your heads at Rock. I just got done dealing with a builder that went 60 days, and I got the "we aren't the ones that pay you, the developer is crap" Now we are going ito snow season and the accountant is pushing for a "due in 10 days after billing, and no service if bill is 5 days over due" Hopefully it works, but for the most part we have good customers that pay ontime if not early.

I am how ever gitting Dikked around by the local university. more about that later.

J.

ccstrebe
12-06-2008, 01:55 PM
For small residential jobs we will get 100% up front. For med/large residential jobs we will get 50% up front, 40% upon delivery and 10% upon completion/customer satisfaction. We prelien everything, that is the only way you can cover yourself. I had one job that was so messed up between the owner, the bank, the lawyers, and the builder that I just wrote off the $1,200.00 they owed me. Three years later I got an unexpected check in the mail, all because I filed a prelien and lien.

Also, make sure everything is in writing.

ksss
12-06-2008, 03:19 PM
Rock and I have carried out similiar conversations on the phone many times and I have told him of this story that I will also share with those of you here relating to this topic.

The house that I have posted on here several times with its estimated value of 25 mil. is in severe trouble finiancially. I am on setting on substantial invoices that have not been paid for two months. Work was suspended on the project for about 2 months. We started the project 3 years and 2 months ago. We have worked for the GC before and never had a problem getting paid on this project or any project. Owner who is an investment guy was apparently hit hard by the economic collapes.

What could have been done to prevent that?

Honestly not much.

When working with large builders and construction companies as I am sure everyone knows, you can send an invoice everyday of the week, other than pissing someone off, you only get paid on the day they pay their bills.

We can talk about how you can protect yourself, but also remember if you make yourself more difficult to work with your than your competetion you will lose work, given the over abundance of contractors and an underabundance of work. I think you can protect yourself somewhat but if you become a PINA to do work with by implimenting what they would term excessive company policies, they wont use you. So there has to be a balance between protection for you and ease working with to the customer.

Yes these are trying times.

ccstrebe
12-06-2008, 04:32 PM
Rock and I have carried out similiar conversations on the phone many times and I have told him of this story that I will also share with those of you here relating to this topic.

The house that I have posted on here several times with its estimated value of 25 mil. is in severe trouble finiancially. I am on setting on substantial invoices that have not been paid for two months. Work was suspended on the project for about 2 months. We started the project 3 years and 2 months ago. We have worked for the GC before and never had a problem getting paid on this project or any project. Owner who is an investment guy was apparently hit hard by the economic collapes.

What could have been done to prevent that?

Honestly not much.

When working with large builders and construction companies as I am sure everyone knows, you can send an invoice everyday of the week, other than pissing someone off, you only get paid on the day they pay their bills.

We can talk about how you can protect yourself, but also remember if you make yourself more difficult to work with your than your competetion you will lose work, given the over abundance of contractors and an underabundance of work. I think you can protect yourself somewhat but if you become a PINA to do work with by implimenting what they would term excessive company policies, they wont use you. So there has to be a balance between protection for you and ease working with to the customer.

Yes these are trying times.

You are right about the balance between protecting yourself and being a pita and the ratio of contractors to work available.

Your situation is exactly what pre liens are for. You might not see money for a long time but that is how you protect yourself. It wont matter if the owner or the GC go bankrupt, the pre lien and consequent lien are on the property not the owner/CG. Filing a pre lien doesn't make one difficult to work with, if anything it makes one look more professional.

Another pre lien/lien story. Fifteen years ago I had a lien on a completed spec home that a contractor built but hadn't sold yet. The contractor had not yet folded but was behind on paying his subs. He owed me 20 large and it had put me in a bind but somehow I was able to get him to let me put an assignment on the spec house.

A couple of months later I was on vacation and I got a call from the contractor telling me he had a buyer but I needed to withdraw the lien on the house, but he would pay me half and the other half later down the road and if I didn't then it would be a deal breaker and he didn't know when I would see any money. I stuck to my guns and called his bluff and figured he would come up with the amount that he was short, he was so pissed at me but I knew that that lien was my ace in the hole. The next day I got a call from the title company and they said my check was ready to pick up..

ksss
12-06-2008, 04:50 PM
Generally I agree preliens are a good idea. This project is an exception to that. We were paid monthly and were required to sign lien releases for each montly draw. No lien release no draw. The project was over 3 years old when it started and likely would take another 9 months to finish. I can and likely will file a lien for the amount owed to me which is near worthless. The house is so over the top it will likely never sell in my life time in this area, however I will lien it never the less. The word is this guy is in the hole over 50 mil. from his own clients. I am sure the subs working on his house will be the last in line to see any type of relief. Sh!t happens, if it were easy money everyone would be doing it.

NEUSWEDE
12-06-2008, 05:12 PM
Late fees are a good idea as well. It gets people to pay faster. This time of the year people slack because they are not thinking of the work they had done. I send them a second invoice with 5%-10% tacked on usually get a call from them the day they get the invoice and usually the money a few days later. Gets them in gear to avoid further charges and gives me more money for doing nothing but waiting an extra 10 days past due date.

YellowDogSVC
12-06-2008, 05:48 PM
Rock and I have carried out similiar conversations on the phone many times and I have told him of this story that I will also share with those of you here relating to this topic.

The house that I have posted on here several times with its estimated value of 25 mil. is in severe trouble finiancially. I am on setting on substantial invoices that have not been paid for two months. Work was suspended on the project for about 2 months. We started the project 3 years and 2 months ago. We have worked for the GC before and never had a problem getting paid on this project or any project. Owner who is an investment guy was apparently hit hard by the economic collapes.

What could have been done to prevent that?

Honestly not much.

When working with large builders and construction companies as I am sure everyone knows, you can send an invoice everyday of the week, other than pissing someone off, you only get paid on the day they pay their bills.

We can talk about how you can protect yourself, but also remember if you make yourself more difficult to work with your than your competetion you will lose work, given the over abundance of contractors and an underabundance of work. I think you can protect yourself somewhat but if you become a PINA to do work with by implimenting what they would term excessive company policies, they wont use you. So there has to be a balance between protection for you and ease working with to the customer.

Yes these are trying times.


I "lien" towards agreeing with KSSS. For smaller jobs, if you want 100% down, or take a prelien, you may lose the job if you project distrust or you have terms that someone is uncomfortable with. I personally turn away a lot of work from GC's, builders, and middle men. Builders in Texas are for the most part unregulated. You may or may not get paid. I have truckers who have lost 10-15k because they let a builder get into them. I have had trouble getting paid by other contractors but rarely from homeowners. I have an outstanding $400 bill right now which is peanuts in the scheme of things but the poor guy lost his job the day after I completed the work. I won't bother him too much. He'll pay me when and if he can. A lien and time spent for $400 is really not worth my time. At $1000, I'll place a lien.
I lost a customer once because I jumped the gun and placed a lien on an outstanding invoice. Lost thousands of dollars of future work because I got hot headed.
It sucks having unpaid invoices. I get bitter and lose sleep. Some customers will pay slow no matter what you do. Some will only pay when they are ready, period. I do like 50% down, though. I think that is reasonable and provides good will on both ends but I am sure some people will balk at that and think we will take the money and run.

It's tough out here...and it is going to get worse before it gets better but I'm keeping the faith that things will improve soon.

coopers
12-06-2008, 05:59 PM
KSSS, sounds like that guys is in some serious trouble.

ksss
12-06-2008, 06:00 PM
I "lien" towards agreeing with KSSS. For smaller jobs, if you want 100% down, or take a prelien, you may lose the job if you project distrust or you have terms that someone is uncomfortable with. I personally turn away a lot of work from GC's, builders, and middle men. Builders in Texas are for the most part unregulated. You may or may not get paid. I have truckers who have lost 10-15k because they let a builder get into them. I have had trouble getting paid by other contractors but rarely from homeowners. I have an outstanding $400 bill right now which is peanuts in the scheme of things but the poor guy lost his job the day after I completed the work. I won't bother him too much. He'll pay me when and if he can. A lien and time spent for $400 is really not worth my time. At $1000, I'll place a lien.
I lost a customer once because I jumped the gun and placed a lien on an outstanding invoice. Lost thousands of dollars of future work because I got hot headed.
It sucks having unpaid invoices. I get bitter and lose sleep. Some customers will pay slow no matter what you do. Some will only pay when they are ready, period. I do like 50% down, though. I think that is reasonable and provides good will on both ends but I am sure some people will balk at that and think we will take the money and run.

It's tough out here...and it is going to get worse before it gets better but I'm keeping the faith that things will improve soon.



All very true. Putting a late fee on a bill, especially for contractors is a waste of time. No one and I mean no one pays them. It might work for homeowners but never for contractors. The reality is you may or may not get paid. Phone calls are much more effective. I actually like meeting face to face unexpectedly. I don't want to say that intimidation is the tactic, I can only say that how they feel is not my problem. You have to pick your clients and your battles wisely. Like Yellow said you jump the gun on a lien and you alienate customers. Too slow and you lose your lien rights. Tough call. That is why it is important to know your customer and their potential. I hate to say it but it influences on how you treat them. Bigger contractor with history of doing large profitable projects gets more room than a homeowner with a one time lawn install would. A lot of people are getting bite as the money gets even tighter,

stuvecorp
12-06-2008, 09:08 PM
All very true. Putting a late fee on a bill, especially for contractors is a waste of time. No one and I mean no one pays them. It might work for homeowners but never for contractors. The reality is you may or may not get paid. Phone calls are much more effective. I actually like meeting face to face unexpectedly. I don't want to say that intimidation is the tactic, I can only say that how they feel is not my problem. You have to pick your clients and your battles wisely. Like Yellow said you jump the gun on a lien and you alienate customers. Too slow and you lose your lien rights. Tough call. That is why it is important to know your customer and their potential. I hate to say it but it influences on how you treat them. Bigger contractor with history of doing large profitable projects gets more room than a homeowner with a one time lawn install would. A lot of people are getting bite as the money gets even tighter,

I agree that the more aggressive or hoops you want the client to abide by the more chance you will not make the cut. It is a very delicate balance and for me personally I have always been careful and have had good luck but them have likely lost work from sticking to the rules.

The phone for me has been the best but when they start to screen me I'll wait a week or two and use my other cell and I always get them. You can tell they are so mad they answered.

It has always annoyed me that people want 30-60 or even try 90 days to pay.

ksss
12-06-2008, 09:51 PM
KSSS, sounds like that guys is in some serious trouble.


I find out exactly how bad we are all in trouble Monday at 1430.

cddva
12-07-2008, 12:01 PM
I'm sorry to hear that the tough times are starting to be felt for alot of you now. As was mentioned, i think this time the economic impact is much broader and deeper than in previous recessions. Over half a million people laid off in the month of November. That's pretty serious stuff. I won't go into the doom and gloom mode here (leave that for GR) but to point out how wide spread the impact is, I work for a major electrical utility company and they are already feeling the impact from this and talking about belt tightening for 09. They are seeing less customers and people aren't paying their electric bills. The part time grading/landscaping work i was doing in VA before taking a new primary job here in FL last Spring has come to a stop based on how bad the local economy is here. So back to the point of this thread, work smart and don't take anything for granted. Maybe one day in the not to distant future some of that bailout money will actually start benefiting the taxpayer.

ksss
12-07-2008, 01:20 PM
I think 09 will certainly start off slowly, hopefully it will pickup some speed but there is not a lot of optimism. There are quite a few projects being considered, everyone is holding off to see what happens. I am guessing that what work does trickle in after the first of the year will be small jobs bid very tightly. That will take some getting used to. It will be time to run lean.

Gravel Rat
12-07-2008, 03:41 PM
The big problem people have spent too much money in a short period of time. Around here it was nuts the way people were spending money it was unlimited. Babyboomers spending their life savings all at once.

Now so many people are deep in debt so its going to take awhie for things to recover. You can't do 10 years worth of economy in 5 years.

I would say 2010 or 2011 things will get better here I don't see 2009 do much not with people foreclosing or in the stages of foreclosing on houses and drowning in debt. When you have no job how are you suppose to pay the bills.

As for the people not paying their bills becarefull. Like I said there is so many people just on the verge of claiming personal bankruptsy.

The whole nation is screwed so there is nothing you can do but ride out and hope for the best.

If the people your giving a estimate or a bid for seem a little off or you get the weird feeling your going to get screwed walk away. Some people have no problems not paying their bills or lie to your face.

What comes around goes around.

I feel bad for the local contractors in my area that are in debt with equipment payments and no work. They had to buy new equipment the equipment they started with had to be replaced it wasn't up to the task of the economy we had. You were doing one job after another you had to time to repair or deal with a worn out excavator or a dump truck that was a maintenance pig. Work here was 24/7 people wanted their job done now not tommorow but now. Contractors had no choice had to buy a brandnew excavator or a new truck etc.

If the work was at a slower pace you could do the jobs with a excavator with high hours because after the job was done it could be repaired. There was no time to stop for repairs. It was one of the reasons why I quit being a mechanic/welder because I couldn't take the hurry hurry need the machine fixed. It was push push push.

There is no dealer mechanics if your in the excavation business here YOU repair your equipment. If you can't repair your own excavator you shouldn't own a excavator. Welding buckets etc thats another thing if you have to hire a welder to weld for you thats expensive. Owning a gravel truck you should beable to repair everything on the truck yourself except for some parts of the engine.

Scag48
12-08-2008, 02:22 PM
My dad is booked solid for '09 and has been for over a month, luckily. Other than that, next year will be iffy to say the least, even in his market which is somewhat isolated from the serious slowdown.

I think late '09 will start to gain speed, spring '10 will kick the tires and light the fires and by fall/winter '10 it's going to explode. I think by '10 I doubt I will have winters off, or will at least have the option to work year 'round if I so choose.

RockSet N' Grade
12-08-2008, 08:58 PM
Just got back from a week end in San Diego.....interesting little story: Lady built a house for a cost of $16 million, went tits-up (so to speak)......bank took it back and just recently it was sold for $3.5 million.......

Ksss, it is past 14:30 on Monday......you still able to speak? :)

YellowDogSVC
12-08-2008, 09:39 PM
Just got back from a week end in San Diego.....interesting little story: Lady built a house for a cost of $16 million, went tits-up (so to speak)......bank took it back and just recently it was sold for $3.5 million.......

Ksss, it is past 14:30 on Monday......you still able to speak? :)


Only 16 million? Does she know how much of Texas she could buy for 16 million? Geez. I'd buy half a county then put a doublewide in the middle!

RockSet N' Grade
12-08-2008, 10:06 PM
YellowDog........I hear ya. San Diego area has a high concentration of ultra rich from all over the world. We cruised around Rancho Sante Fe and $16 mil. was an average price...drove by Anthony Robbins ,the self motivation guru's castle, and I mean castle literally and figuratively........he has mideval turrets and his home must be 20,000 sq. ft plus on the top of a hill..........the list goes on. Pretty amazing. Saw more Ferrari's, Maserati's, Rolls, Audi high end models and exotics that I don't even know the name of roaring up and down the roads.........huge amount of outdo the Jone's kinda mind set. Personally, show me the money and I will take a county with a double wide myself too! Good to be home to a slower lifestyle and less noise.......

ksss
12-10-2008, 05:56 PM
Well, meeting went about as I thought. Were F@cked. Several options being considered. We'll see if we cant reduce our losses some how. There were about 12 guys in the meeting. Some much worse off than me. Merry Christmas.:clapping:

Gravel Rat
12-10-2008, 06:33 PM
If the house is worth 18 million or what ever its worth start stripping it. I imagine there is some nice plumbing fixtures and fancy jetted bath tubs.

Junior M
12-10-2008, 09:48 PM
Well, meeting went about as I thought. Were F@cked. Several options being considered. We'll see if we cant reduce our losses some how. There were about 12 guys in the meeting. Some much worse off than me. Merry Christmas.:clapping:
We'll that sucks.

GR, what are you going to do with plumbing fixtures and tubs, there not worth much...

Gravel Rat
12-10-2008, 10:09 PM
Well Junior you haven't been in a expensive house before have you. A set of bathroom taps probably cost more than the trailer you live in :laugh:

Just kidding :canadaflag:

Kitchen cabinets are worth money who knows you might want to do a renovation. If people can't pay the bills take stuff from the house that can cover the cost of the bill.

There are houses in Vancouver (B.C.) the bathroom tile is over 30 grand.

stuvecorp
12-10-2008, 10:19 PM
Well, meeting went about as I thought. Were F@cked. Several options being considered. We'll see if we cant reduce our losses some how. There were about 12 guys in the meeting. Some much worse off than me. Merry Christmas.:clapping:

That sucks, hope you guys figure something out.

john_bud
12-10-2008, 10:21 PM
GR, my family has yet to get paid on directional drill shots we did back in 2000, and 2001. But we cant do anything about it because all the guys have went bankrupt under the business name and came back under a different one so technically the first business owed Dad money and when they went bankrupt it was just forgotten...


A friend had a similar situation. The deadbeats came back wanting work done. The usual played out with, No, please, no, please, no, please, no --- what will it take?

Cash in advance, was the answer. They paid. He packed up and left. They called and asked WTF? He said thanks for clearing your bill.

RockSet N' Grade
12-10-2008, 10:33 PM
Just a heads up: Taking materials, appliances, etc. from a job site once they have been delievered is illegal and can land you in jail. Some times it is a raw deal, sometimes you can take bulk material off that has not been used.....but scavenging a house will certainly put you in more hot water than it is worth.

Gravel Rat
12-11-2008, 12:21 AM
You have to make a deal with the homeowner if you don't have the cash money to pay the bill then you get what you want out of the house.

Junior M
12-11-2008, 06:59 AM
Well Junior you haven't been in a expensive house before have you. A set of bathroom taps probably cost more than the trailer you live in :laugh:

Just kidding :canadaflag:

Kitchen cabinets are worth money who knows you might want to do a renovation. If people can't pay the bills take stuff from the house that can cover the cost of the bill.

There are houses in Vancouver (B.C.) the bathroom tile is over 30 grand.
Yeah, but bathroom tile and fixtures arent going to pay a huge bill, how are you goin to turn those things in to cash? I mean you could carry a kitchen cabinet into the equipment dealership and say here now I need 5 gallons of hydraulic fluid? I dont think they would like that though. and I dont live in a trailer! I am high class, I live in a Double wide! :laugh:

We are actually stealing things out of other houses this GC has to finish the house we're working on now...

bobcat_ron
12-11-2008, 10:01 AM
Yeah, but bathroom tile and fixtures arent going to pay a huge bill, how are you goin to turn those things in to cash? I mean you could carry a kitchen cabinet into the equipment dealership and say here now I need 5 gallons of hydraulic fluid?


The types of bathrooms that GR refers to have marble and granite tiles, they are super easy to pull up once you get started, their sheer weight holds them down with a little bit of mastick underneath, so all you need to do is go back to the place that sell the tiles and sell it back to them, then you got some money.

Junior M
12-11-2008, 11:08 AM
The types of bathrooms that GR refers to have marble and granite tiles, they are super easy to pull up once you get started, their sheer weight holds them down with a little bit of mastick underneath, so all you need to do is go back to the place that sell the tiles and sell it back to them, then you got some money.
Oh, never heard of a supply house buying back used material..

bobcat_ron
12-11-2008, 11:29 AM
Oh, never heard of a supply house buying back used material..

I worked for a house building company when I was a kid and the owner told us that in the big $$$ houses, if the owners seemed a little "odd" with money, they told the trades to do a good job, but do it in such a way that if the owners didn't pay, they could go back in an remove the tiles and fixtures within and hour or two and reclaim the costs of the materials. :laugh:

Gravel Rat
12-11-2008, 01:46 PM
Why even sell the stuff use it in your own house its stuff that a average person can't afford. Wouldn't you want a kitchen with granite counter tops or a bath tub that has the features of a hot tub.

The only problem is if the homeowner hasn't paid the supplier for that matterials use in the house then your out of luck.

bobcat_ron
12-11-2008, 01:54 PM
Why even sell the stuff use it in your own house its stuff that a average person can't afford. Wouldn't you want a kitchen with granite counter tops or a bath tub that has the features of a hot tub..

I dunno, granite counter tops and marble floors might not look so good next to a green toilet and pink bath tub with an Ernie and Bert shower curtain. :laugh:

Junior M
12-11-2008, 01:59 PM
Why even sell the stuff use it in your own house its stuff that a average person can't afford. Wouldn't you want a kitchen with granite counter tops or a bath tub that has the features of a hot tub.

The only problem is if the homeowner hasn't paid the supplier for that matterials use in the house then your out of luck.
That would be nice, but having granite counter tops doesnt pay your equipment payments or fuel bills...

Gravel Rat
12-11-2008, 02:29 PM
You take what ever you can get because you may 99% of the time never get paid. Once a recievership company takes over the estate the larger companies get paid first so you may not get paid at all. It could take you over a year maybe 2 years to see any money from the recievership company.

A recievership company is a company hired by the bank to deal with the company that went bankrupt. The recievership company sells off the assets of the bankrupt person/company. The bank is always the first one paid and the recievership company takes a chunk for their service. Then what what is left is paid to the creditors that are owed money like the contractors.

With the realestate market tanked it will be hard to sell a million dollars house so it probably will be sold in pieces depending on how far the house is in progress.