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Smallaxe
12-18-2008, 12:50 PM
I would like to find some research done on 1) What the roots pick up from the soil and store in those roots. and 2) What the roots do to create the elements in the sap that goes to the leaf for photosynthesis. and 3) What elements the leaf returns to the to the roots for growth and storage.

I am looking for a rather detailed, step by step process, that discusses some of the mechanisms involved.

Thanks for any help. :)

jeffmoore
12-18-2008, 12:55 PM
CAT.INIST.fr give that a try

Kiril
12-18-2008, 01:03 PM
Didn't I post a link to a Plant Physiology textbook a while back?

JDUtah
12-18-2008, 01:38 PM
Sure did Kiril... one sec....

Smallaxe
12-18-2008, 01:40 PM
Didn't I post a link to a Plant Physiology textbook a while back?

I have been fairly consistant in looking over the websites you have posted and have even bookmarked some of them.
I don't recall reading anything that detailed the process I am looking for, in this particular case. :)

Meanwhile I will google CAT.INIST.fr Thanks.

JDUtah
12-18-2008, 01:52 PM
I know you followed this thread Smallaxe, but I will post it for any other readers. Kiril posted a 'back end' load of articles through the discussion...

The thread (http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=237121)

The book (http://www.lawnsite.com/showpost.php?p=2419015&postcount=172)

treegal1
12-18-2008, 10:27 PM
ok so here it goes, 3 wiki links in a row, sorry......

in my mind the type of root is to its function.............

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root

there is also some referance at the bottom that looks great

Smallaxe
12-21-2008, 09:43 AM
Thanks for the references, but none of them have shown me what I would like to be able to detail.

We all know that roots take up soluable nutrients. Questions are:
What happens to the various nutrients brought in by roots at the time of dormancy?
Are there any nutrients/sugars stored in stem or root that do not get synthesized?
Does the root actually bring in nutrients/sugars when the plant is dormant and no chlorophyll is present?

We know the plant brings in water all winter - but not much is said about root or stem storage of unphotosynthesized chemicals.

Even some charts with brief statements about individual nutrients as they move through the plant, would be helpful.

Thanks again.

RigglePLC
12-21-2008, 11:44 AM
Ax,
I am a botanist. There are many complexities and variations relative to root uptake. A fat book in itself. To summarize, from my old text (Salisbury and Ross, Plant Physiology), Nitrate is absorbed by the root cells (although ammonium can also be absorbed). Nitrate absorbtion is an active process and it requires energy in the form of sugars supplied from photosynthesis in the leaves. The nitrate is then reduced and converted to ammonium (again using energy); this is then converted to organic compounds such as glutamic acid and asparagine which can be safely transported in the xylem to the upper portions of the plant. (Ammonium is somewhat toxic to plants, once it is within the plant). But some grasses have appreciable amounts of nitrate in the xylem stream. Many of the early mineral nutrition experiments were conducted in hydroponic culture or in washed sand or perlite.

See also Jim Beard's excellent book, "Turfgrass Science and Culture".

RigglePLC
12-21-2008, 11:58 AM
Ax, I forgot part of your question. Sugars are stored in roots after being converted to starch (usually). I suspect that nitrogen is stored in various organic compounds. Since the plant is dormant I would think that not much energy is available to bring in minerals during the winter and if the storage within the cells was full, saturated, not much could happen.

Tim Wilson
12-21-2008, 12:59 PM
Smallaxe;

I have some research papers which detail the creation of carbohydrates (carbons) through photosynthesis and subsequent delivery through the root system followed by uptake of (nitrogen) nitrates and ammonia. I hesitated to give you these as they do not specifically address your questions.

Your original question lacked a few details which it seems are important to you. For example dormancy was not mentioned nor whether you are discussing annuals or perennials. I suggest that you break down your questions into as many components and details as possible, writing them down. Then you can use those questions or formal scientific words which form part of the questions and use those to conduct a search through the Internet.

Tim Wilson
12-21-2008, 02:12 PM
http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/current.dtl

Here is a source of many free articles. One good way to track down free articles is to click on links to articles which were cited to write another article or to do research.

growingdeeprootsorganicly
12-21-2008, 03:32 PM
smallaxe,

this is just an opinion of mine and i'll research it more but, plants like vascular plants
do probably store a majority of their winter nutrient needs in the form of sugars"starch"
and peptids"proteins" and both can act as a type of anti freeze for the plant, since more nutrient absorption happens at higher temps it would make sense for the plant to start storing more
food for the winter before winter comes, but one thing too, that if the plant and some microbes in the soil can produce antifreeze substances too and are active at colder temps that they will still need carbon inputs from the plant to function, so one would think as long as the whole SYSTEM(plant,soil,microbes)are not completely frozen that there will still be nutrients cycling like N to the plant in the winter just at smaller amounts?

Smallaxe
12-22-2008, 09:39 AM
Ax, I forgot part of your question. Sugars are stored in roots after being converted to starch (usually). I suspect that nitrogen is stored in various organic compounds. Since the plant is dormant I would think that not much energy is available to bring in minerals during the winter and if the storage within the cells was full, saturated, not much could happen.

Thanks for the well thought out responses.

I too thought mostly about the carbohydrates being stored in the roots. [similar to fat storage in us]
The idea of protiens being stored in a plants I figured would be similar to proteins in muscle tissue with us.
Is that true? Is glutamic acid and asparagine stored only in tissue of the plant or is it readily available in specialised storage cells?

[ Constrasting Exa.: *As a starving human being would use up all the energy in the fat cells, he, would also need to cannibalize his own muscle tissue for amino acids necessary to keep the heart muscle alive.] So does growing grass of early spring have N type proteins readily available or is it just held in reserve in the xylem stream?

I do not know if my question is clear or not. But essentially, what I am trying to make sense of - is the 'winterizer' philosophy.
In this area we are told to apply winterizer after the upper portion has stopped growing [as much a a month after the last mowing]. Many times already subjected to several frosts by then that has killed most everything else. That is when we apply.

How long after that does it take for it to get dissolved into the soil and available? 2 weeks or so on semi-frozen turf? Then what can the roots do with it after the top is buried in snow or turned brown? I can't picture in my mind's eye what is happening in the roots during this time.

Thanks again to everyone, for their input. I have bookmarked some new sites that I intend to review. :)

Kiril
12-22-2008, 10:13 AM
In this area we are told to apply winterizer after the upper portion has stopped growing [as much a a month after the last mowing].

Source of info?

Smallaxe
12-22-2008, 11:12 AM
This one has the cut-off of late October, rather than late November.

http://outagamie.uwex.edu/hort/documents/LawnCareTips.pdf

Typically the last mowing for the area is early to mid-October. I couldn't find the other essay, that called for a Thanksgiving application, but it did have its affect on the LCOs in the area, in that, TGCL and others apply that late.

I will continue looking over time and see if that article is still a part of the extension service for this part of Wisco. Maybe it has been changed over the past couple years. :)