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JDUtah
12-23-2008, 02:27 AM
Alright guys, talking to a friend who wants to control them organically, what suggestions do you have? The things ate up their graden last year, any suggestions?

Smallaxe
12-23-2008, 07:43 AM
Neem oil. Handpicking. Bt and/or wasps.

Depending on how much of a purist they are - there is a line of products in the garden shops that claim to be organic or natural or something. I forget the brand name.

ICT Bill
12-23-2008, 10:16 AM
Alright guys, talking to a friend who wants to control them organically, what suggestions do you have? The things ate up their graden last year, any suggestions?

Don't plant squash????:rolleyes:
They obviously do not have a predator to keep them in check, I would do a little research to see who their natural predator is.

You could use oils to spray ON THEM, but if you are not around for a few days they may take hold while you are not around

They like the food source that is there if they are big numbers, obviously

Often with an infestation you have to break the life cycle. Chinch bugs for instance have a 3 to 4 week life cycle, if you can spray oils every week for 4 to 5 weeks you can normally break the life cycle. basically no adults to lay eggs, no eggs no pests. I don't know the life cycle of squash bugs

Kiril
12-23-2008, 10:19 AM
Alright guys, talking to a friend who wants to control them organically, what suggestions do you have? The things ate up their graden last year, any suggestions?

Squash them :laugh:

44DCNF
12-23-2008, 12:01 PM
Safer insecticidal soap and diatomaceous earth.

JDUtah
12-23-2008, 12:10 PM
Samllaxe,
Wasps might be a rout to take, any suggestions to encourage populations? Also, What's Bt?

Bill,
Darn IPM just sakes so much effort. :) I totally agree, and will read up on their life cycle this winter.

Kiril,
Lol

44DCNF,
Any suggestions on the soap? Will DE really affect them? I understand it cuts them to death? Not sure?

EVERYONE, THANKS for the responses! :)

ICT Bill
12-23-2008, 12:14 PM
Samllaxe,
Wasps might be a rout to take, any suggestions to encourage populations? Also, What's bt

Bacillus therungensis, is a fungi that enters the gut of the grub and eats it from the inside out, kind of. It makes biomass out of grubs
The only issue is getting the BT numbers up in the soil so that the grub will come in contact with it, no contact no kill. for effective control you have to apply a couple times a year for a couple years. It is inherent in our Instant Compost Tea, Kurstaki and Isrealisnis strains

44DCNF
12-23-2008, 01:15 PM
I've done weekly soil drenches with Bti and eliminated fungus gnats (born in the soil) in 3-4 weeks (indoors). I don't know if squash bugs are affected by it as adults, and they are hatched on the plant. If you don't mind reading from a site that sells some DE but happens to have some good information on different pests, here is some info (http://www.planetnatural.com/site/xdpy/kb/squash-bug-control.html) on the squash bugs lifecycle and some other control measures, like row covers, and trapping and removal.

The insecticidal soap, you would spray the plants to wet them, focusing on undersides of leaves to get the eggs. I haven't dealt with squash bugs in particular, but had success with it on several other similar pests. I would target eggs and newly hatched bugs with the soap, dust DE for the larvae, and trap and collect adults, which can then be dunked in the soap mix to kill.
Try those and I am sure he will be pleased with the results.

phasthound
12-23-2008, 02:28 PM
Alright guys, talking to a friend who wants to control them organically, what suggestions do you have? The things ate up their graden last year, any suggestions?

ATTRA is a good source for natural solutions.

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/squash_pest.html

growingdeeprootsorganicly
12-23-2008, 03:16 PM
Bacillus therungensis, is a fungi

....................:confused:

Smallaxe
12-23-2008, 06:06 PM
JD,
I simply listed some of the cures that I have come across over the years. There is research that needs to go into each individual critter as to how best to defeat it. Neem oil seems more generalized , yet some of the purists have a problem with it. I grew zucchini a couple of times but never squash.

The idea of healthy organic gardening is that if - you have virile healthy plants the insects do not zero in on them. Their eyes are programmed to alight upon leaves that they see 'yellow' in. Stong healthy plants , growing in a suitable environment will NOT have pest problems.

As Kiril has been trying to put forth: the right plant in the right environment - native landscape being sustainable.
Regardless, if you can grow healthy plants and discourage the 'munchers' with a little neem, then, you should get a descent harvest.

Is gardening different than growing grass?
In some ways - Oh Yes! :)

JDUtah
12-23-2008, 06:21 PM
You guys have given me a place to start. Thanks again :)

muddstopper
12-23-2008, 06:26 PM
To methods for controling squash bugs.

row covers, handpcking, trapping under boards at night, growing non preferred varities, promp composting of debris.


Neem

ICT Bill
12-23-2008, 07:00 PM
To methods for controling squash bugs.

row covers, handpcking, trapping under boards at night, growing non preferred varities, promp composting of debris.


Neem


MUDD, I hope this message find you warm and close to home. AAHHH isn't wonderful thinking about picking bugs off a plant while in shorts with your salt shaker nearby to pick that perfect tomato...AAAHHHHH

Unfortunately it has barely gotten above freezing for several days

Tim Wilson
12-23-2008, 09:02 PM
....................:confused:

Bacillus thuringienis var. israelensis is what I believe Bill was referring to which is a bacterial spore (gram +) as I recall and not fungi. Generally certain insect larvae eat it and die. It is not something which should be arbitrarily mixed into any microbial concoction. I posted some extensive information concerning it in a thread about mosquitos.

Regarding the squash bugs. They are very similar to the common stink bug and if I were hassled by them I'd set out drowning pots for them with sugar or molasses and water and hang some praying mantis egg bags. Praying mantis may stomach them.

Neem oil, I've found to be as useful as Sunlight dish soap.

ICT Bill
12-24-2008, 10:31 AM
....................:confused:

I missed that one, thanks for the heads up, obviously BT is a bacteria or bacterium not fungi