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View Full Version : Can you use an Electric pump on a skid sprayer?


THC
01-15-2009, 06:59 PM
I'm doing some research into building my own skid as I'm not likely going to be buying a $4000 skid, so I'm looking for cheaper options.

After pricing out what a hypro D30 pump with regulator costs (Hypro D30 with Gear Reduction and Regulator $888 canadian:() then gas engine etc. I can't see how to build one cheaper then Rittenhouse sells them for already made.:confused:
Electric hose reel is about the same price to.

So, is an electric pump viable? does' it run off your truck battery, do you have to have a 2nd battery installed?

Pros and cons?

Should I stick with shur flo and spreader? I think image is just as important as work btw so I want to look the part if I'm going to expand out spraying.

THC
01-15-2009, 08:14 PM
Hm.. I found these pumps and there is a line at the bottom that says "This unit is commonly found on US Weed Man electric sprayers."


http://www.rittenhouse.ca/asp/product.asp?PG=149

DUSTYCEDAR
01-15-2009, 08:17 PM
Gregson clark is a good place to look

DUSTYCEDAR
01-15-2009, 08:20 PM
http://www.gregsonclark.com/

phasthound
01-15-2009, 08:29 PM
I understand the desire to build something as cheaply as possible to start a business. However, $4,000 is a minimal expence for a critical part of the business to be efficient. You can go the cheap route by buying an electric pump. Then you may find out how much more capabilities you have with the Hypro and spend more to replace the electric pump. Only you can make that decision. My advice is to get the best equipment you can.

THC
01-15-2009, 08:49 PM
That's always a concern, I thought I learned that lesson when I bought home owner toro mowers. Now it's all commercial and worth every penny but I still need to be thrifty as possible. $4000 is a lot of money to me even though I paid about that for my walk behind and $2600 for a trailer a couple years ago.

But I'd still like to look at cheaper options for a home made skid because even though I'll be advertising I don't know how many customers I'll get and I want to make sure I make money on my set up THIS year if possible. The economy is scary if you know what I mean.

RigglePLC
01-16-2009, 12:03 AM
THC, If you do a hundred customers at 50 dollars each--thats $5000--you could have it paid for by the Fourth of July. Scroll down 4 inches to Gregson Clark.
Electric pump--battery operated? One third horsepower? Are you serious? "There is no substitute for power," said by my Honda dealer.

mngrassguy
01-16-2009, 02:18 AM
I know a lot of guys who started out with electric pumps at first, then upgraded to hydro later when they could afford it. If your only doing lawns (not trees) you should be ok for a year or two. Electric pumps are reasonably cheap and can be run off your truck battery. Expect to get 3 gls/min max.

greendoctor
01-16-2009, 04:39 AM
Late last year, I needed a skid sprayer badly to treat a 10 acre lawn. Soon after, I got called to apply a soil injection and spray to over 50 trees on a 5 acre estate.

$350 100 gallon poly PCO tank
$1000 Hypro D30 + 6.5HP engine
$300 200' 3/8 Kuri-Tec 800 PSI hose
$250 hose reel
$200 misc plumbing and fittings including jet agitation system

I am at a little under $3000 for all of this. It is safe to say that the accessories I attach to this cost as much as or more than the skid sprayer itself

$2000 Teejet 834 spray controller system.
$250 10' wet boom(this is mounted on my truck bumper for treating acreage)

A walking boom, all kinds of nozzles, Turbo gun, Arag Long Range Tree gun, custom wand for shrubs and nursery applications. Lots of this was accumulated over my many years in the business. Added up, I am sure it is a lot. But everything down to the nozzle set I keep, sets me apart from my competition with their SP or Solo backpack sprayers and the adjustable nozzle at the end of their wand.

RAlmaroad
01-16-2009, 06:54 AM
Been there done everything. Another option to the Hypro (Best Pump) is a 8-roller Hypro Pump. I saw some of these on skids in SC. The pump is easier to maintain and will give enough pressure for lawns but not enough for trees. Check them out at Rittenhouse. The main drawback from the 12-Volt is enough pressure and enough GPM at a reasonable pace.

rcreech
01-16-2009, 08:59 AM
Electric pumps are all I use.

They have their drawbacks, such a GPM/higher pressure....but work awesome!

Don't have to worry about them not starting, gas, noise etc.

RAlmaroad
01-16-2009, 09:55 AM
Electric pumps are all I use.

They have their drawbacks, such a GPM/higher pressure....but work awesome!

Don't have to worry about them not starting, gas, noise etc.

Just being nosy, but what pumps are you using? And what pressure and GPM are they? Thanks Roy

THC
01-16-2009, 08:33 PM
I sent you an email about your electric pumps rceech but never heard back.. that's why I started this thread.

I would also like to hear more about your set up. I got all your pics and it looks Great.

rcreech
01-16-2009, 11:02 PM
I sent you an email about your electric pumps rceech but never heard back.. that's why I started this thread.

I would also like to hear more about your set up. I got all your pics and it looks Great.

Oops...I read this real quick as I thought you said you didn't get my e-mail so I just resent it!

So you will be getting it again!

For some reason I never got your e-mial. Can you resend it?

Thanks for the compliment!

Thanks,
RC

rcreech
01-16-2009, 11:06 PM
Here is the info from the last time I posted.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=219146

AmGreen
01-28-2009, 02:50 PM
RCREECH - are you using a bypass pump or a demand switch pump on your applications. I'm sure you know the difference, but just in case - I'm gathering, a bypass pump continues to supply pressure the entire time it is running (good to be used to include an agitator) and a demand pump has a preset pressure setting that cuts the motor off when it reaches that psi. I guess I've been reading and understanding everything correctly...

So here are my thoughts - I've definitely decided to go with a 12 v set up (mainly thanks to you), but should I go with the bypass or the demand pump? I was thinking of using a second pump to supply agitation separately that way a could turn it on just before pulling up to a site. However, I guess I could do that with the bypass pump as well......I don't know, I guess it's all running together by now.

I've found a good pump (for the money), a Delavan Fat Boy that is rated at 7gpm at either 60 psi or 100 psi (depending on the model - according to a chart) - does that sound like a pretty good option for an occasional spray job? And I guess one or two deep cycle batteries will suffice...?

rcreech
01-28-2009, 06:04 PM
It would work better the for an ocassional job! I literally use mine to pump about 100-150 gallon every day!

I use a regular bypass pump.

I just run it off my truck battery and it works great!

Let me know if you have any other questions!

Good Luck!

RC

CHARLES CUE
01-28-2009, 06:30 PM
I'm doing some research into building my own skid as I'm not likely going to be buying a $4000 skid, so I'm looking for cheaper options.

After pricing out what a hypro D30 pump with regulator costs (Hypro D30 with Gear Reduction and Regulator $888 canadian:() then gas engine etc. I can't see how to build one cheaper then Rittenhouse sells them for already made.:confused:
Electric hose reel is about the same price to.

So, is an electric pump viable? does' it run off your truck battery, do you have to have a 2nd battery installed?

Pros and cons?

Should I stick with shur flo and spreader? I think image is just as important as work btw so I want to look the part if I'm going to expand out spraying.

I you know by now that yes you can use a electric pumps there are all kinds and some cost a bunch not much cheaper than a gas set up
how about a used 5 hp motor and a roller pump or a centrifugal pump may not be as good as a diaphragm pump but for a lawn work you dont need much pressure and you save money
Just another thought
Charles Cue

AmGreen
01-28-2009, 07:39 PM
I you know by now that yes you can use a electric pumps there are all kinds and some cost a bunch not much cheaper than a gas set up
how about a used 5 hp motor and a roller pump or a centrifugal pump may not be as good as a diaphragm pump but for a lawn work you dont need much pressure and you save money
Just another thought
Charles Cue


I'd actually considered that, but I then figured I would need a pressure regulator to add on. Or maybe I wouldn't if I'm running the same line back to the tank as agitation (I don't know...decisions, decisions). The other pro to the electric pump will be the super quiet operation if I do pick up considerable business and need to get going early in the morning. Not to mention, no pouring gas, and no cranking.

What keeps a roller or a centrifugal from being as good as a diaphragm? - aside from the pressure.

AmGreen
01-28-2009, 07:50 PM
It would work better the for an ocassional job! I literally use mine to pump about 100-150 gallon every day!

I use a regular bypass pump.

I just run it off my truck battery and it works great!

Let me know if you have any other questions!

Good Luck!

RC

Does that quantity (7gpm @ 100psi) seem as though it would be sufficient?
And am I correct to say that you basically run a splitter to your hose and then return a hose back to your tank for agitation? I'm having a hard time understanding how the bypass pump maintains pressure when you are either pulling the trigger or not - how does it keep from creating "too much pressure". I'm not expecting you to give me all the answers just a little direction. I need a "how to build a spray rig for dummies" book :laugh:

CHARLES CUE
01-28-2009, 08:51 PM
I'd actually considered that, but I then figured I would need a pressure regulator to add on. Or maybe I wouldn't if I'm running the same line back to the tank as agitation (I don't know...decisions, decisions). The other pro to the electric pump will be the super quiet operation if I do pick up considerable business and need to get going early in the morning. Not to mention, no pouring gas, and no cranking.

What keeps a roller or a centrifugal from being as good as a diaphragm? - aside from the pressure.

quiet is nice but cant have every thing you need a pres regulator no matter what pump you use
what makes a diaphragm better you get pressure and volume
where a roller pump gives you pressure not alot of volume a centrifugal gets you volume but not a lot of pressure i dont pour gas i get at the gas station one tank last all day and mine gots eletric start theres pros and cones to every thing i dont think theres better just what works for you just get started and make changes that suite you as needed every ones differnt just dont get a manul hose reel you will be cranking up 250 ft of hose by hand not fun 10 times a day and beleve me even small lawns take that much to get around the house
good luck Charles Cue

KES
01-28-2009, 11:11 PM
Was just reading this and wanted to put my 2 cents into the hat. Electric works fine for spraying one or two yards a day, but for more than that go with a skid unit with a gas engine and so forth. I know I just bought a new skid unit from a dealer in Chatt, TN. It is a 300 gallon Cub Cadet. I looked around and found that it is the exact thing a Lesco unit is except for a poly tank instead of a fiberglass. You can save some $ by buying a Cub Cadet. $1800 to be exact.

If you are serious about the lawn care drop the dough and it will pay off in the long run.

Derek