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View Full Version : Help with Lime please


LazyWeekends
01-16-2009, 11:48 AM
I am bidding the maintenance for the common areas of a large subdivision. I am trying to figure the best way to handle the liming. The specs call for 1 ton/acre over all turf areas and the area in question is 106 acres. So I'll need 106 tons and was thinking of using bulk lime as opposed to bagged lime which is double the price of bulk. Most of the property is made up of sections that will not accomodate a regular agricultural lime spreader so will probably need to use Permagreen or a Z-Sprayer/spreader or a spreader attachment behind a tractor.
Something to consider is that the bulk lime that I am able to get is not pelletized and I am not sure if it would spread properly with any of the above listed equipment. I'd really appreciate any thoughts you all have.

southernsprayguy
01-16-2009, 01:46 PM
Don't use bulk lime dude!!! It's cheap yes...makes a huge mess yes. People are going to drive by just to see what the hell is going on when they see that BIG white cloud of dust hovering over the property. Go with the bag lime unless you are going to lose a lot of money. I personally would pay a little extra for convienence...no what I'm saying.

RAlmaroad
01-16-2009, 06:04 PM
Talk with you local Co-Op. They may have palletized lime in bulk or Dolomite in bulk. Our Co-op mixes fertilize and I'm sure the filler is still lime. Anyway, it's worth a phone call.

Barefoot James
01-16-2009, 06:21 PM
Add the lime to compost top dressing.

40 lbs per year per K, dang do you need this every year!!!!

"I have told the story many times on here of the citrus farmer that applied lime at huge rates for 30 years, 30 YEARS........ why didn't it correct the soil ???? after 30 years of applications ......why ???
He took the lime and composted it and applied the compost to the farm, the next year the test came back that no lime was needed... HUH ??""

"As told by treegal and ICT Bill"

I too tried it on two properties and look forward to the tests this spring!
Both of these properties have required liming every year for over ten years.

NEW CITY LAWN CARE LLC
01-16-2009, 06:27 PM
I am bidding the maintenance for the common areas of a large subdivision. I am trying to figure the best way to handle the liming. The specs call for 1 ton/acre over all turf areas and the area in question is 106 acres. So I'll need 106 tons and was thinking of using bulk lime as opposed to bagged lime which is double the price of bulk. Most of the property is made up of sections that will not accomodate a regular agricultural lime spreader so will probably need to use Permagreen or a Z-Sprayer/spreader or a spreader attachment behind a tractor.
Something to consider is that the bulk lime that I am able to get is not pelletized and I am not sure if it would spread properly with any of the above listed equipment. I'd really appreciate any thoughts you all have.

How do these people in charge of this account know their property needs liming? Seems like an odd contract requirement, especially for a residential subdivision.

Barefoot James
01-16-2009, 07:10 PM
Soil tests seem to always say you need to lime. these folks probably got a test done and said they needed lime and have just got into the habit of liming every year. Try adding lime to compost - it should work.

ted putnam
01-16-2009, 07:52 PM
106 acres covered with Lime much less compost. All I can say is...Have Fun!

Barefoot James
01-16-2009, 08:19 PM
Just takes the right tools.

Kiril
01-16-2009, 10:13 PM
I would like to see the "specs" and how they were determined.

muddstopper
01-17-2009, 06:33 PM
I would like to see the soil test used to determine the specs.

At anyrate, look for a tagalong drop spreader, http://www.gandy.net/10t_turf.php3 to apply your bulk lime. Using a drop spreader will help keep the dust down. You might also want to go down to your local fertilizer co-op and see if they will bag the bulk lime for you instead of hualing it in a dump truck. It might increase the cost somewhat, but it beats shoveling it into the spreader. You might even be able to talk them into mixing your fert with the bulk lime for a single application instead of having to go over the area twice. Personally, I would just buy the bagged lime and be done with it. The bagged lime is usually finer grind material and more effective. On 106 tons of lime you will save enough money using pulverized bagged lime instead of pelletized to pay for the drop spreader.

greendoctor
01-17-2009, 07:07 PM
I would also look into flowable lime. No dust and it is easy to broadcast. Because it is ground so fine to get it into suspension, it also takes less to correct the pH. If you are in the wet part of Oregon, I can see the need to lime regularly. The high rainfall leaches out calcium.

NEW CITY LAWN CARE LLC
01-17-2009, 07:12 PM
Couldn't you get a Liquid Concentrate and go that route?

greendoctor
01-17-2009, 07:19 PM
For small jobs, here is what I use. http://www.clearychemical.com/view_product.php?id=4902&cat=34 For larger jobs, I have applied hydrated lime + magnesium sulfate. At 5 lb hydrated lime per 1000 in 5 gallons of water, it is not too bad to apply.

LazyWeekends
01-21-2009, 11:06 AM
Thanks for all your input. I have spoken to one of our local agri dealers and he can organize bulk peletized lime and will also bag it for me. Wtih regard to the questions on how was the lime quantity determined, their committee used an arbitary number for the sake of comparing bids. I would agree a soil test would need to be taken to get the correct recommendations.